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1/5 Scale 18 Cylinder Radial Engine

John Davis

Subscriber
Age
58
Last Subscription Date
03/23/2019
I shot a few photo's of my fathers latest project. It's a 1/5 scale of a Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp18 cylinder radial engine. Plans of the scale down engine sold by Lee Hodgson. The plans come in a binder that is about 3 inches thick. It only has one casting all other parts are machined from raw stock. You do have the option of purchasing some of the gears. Dads only been working on the engine for about a month. They say it takes about 2000 hours to do all the machining. I think dad is a head of schedule. The full size R-2800 was used to power several types of fighters and medium bombers during the war, notably the US Navy's F4U Corsair, with the first prototype Corsair becoming the first-ever US fighter plane to exceed 400 mph in level flight during October 1940, the Corsair's naval rival, the Grumman F6F Hellcat, the US Army Air Forces P-47 Thunderbolt, and the twin-engined B-26 Marauder & A-26 Invader. Over 30 different planes used the R-2800 engine.








 
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Les Layton

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/11/2019
I think these engines were also used in the Spruce Goose, which in a museum near me. There is a cutaway of the engine at floor level that you can look at. I think they were 2000 horsepower. Sure would like to hear one run.. Les :brows:
 

K D Redd

In Memory Of
NO Great Aircraft Engine expert but I think the R-2800 was use on several aircraft, P-47, F-6F, F-4U, I think also the B-26 and I am sure others. I also think a R-2800 was use in a helo but I am not sure what it was called. The engine sat low with clam sheel doors over it. The pilot sat high and to the rear of the engine.

Kent
 

John Davis

Subscriber
Age
58
Last Subscription Date
03/23/2019
A few more photo's to show the progress my father has made on his radial engine. Dad had to take off a couple weeks in the middle of this machining run to have melanoma skin cancer removed from his arm. Gave us all a real scare. Thank the good lord above that everything come back clear and he is in good health.





 
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John Davis

Subscriber
Age
58
Last Subscription Date
03/23/2019
The last photo is of all the roughed out blanks for the cylinders. Lot of grooving to be done for cooling fins.







 

fabricator

Registered
Absolute artistry, the most talented artist or composer could not even come close to the pure artistry of that piece of work. Anybody who has done any machine work knows what is involved in a project like that.
 

gbritnell

Registered
Man, what a project! The work so far is outstanding. I would like to build a radial but I don't think I would be starting on one like this. Keep up the good work.
gbritnell
 

John Davis

Subscriber
Age
58
Last Subscription Date
03/23/2019
My father was a tool & die maker for 36 years for a major defense company here in Florida. Ever sense I can remember his will power and determination to do difficult jobs like this has always been unbelievable. Even now at 76 years young he has more will power and determination to do this kind of work then most people could ever dream. He can still out work me when it comes to machining and building things.
 

OTTO-Sawyer

Subscriber
Age
57
Last Subscription Date
07/15/2019
I'm more impressed every time I look.

I like the idea of having screw-on heads.

Do the valve cages screw into the heads too, or how are they mounted ?

Just courious... are the valve seats discolored from being heat treated to harden them, or are they made of brass, and if so, how long are they expected to hold up ? (especially the exhaust valve seat)
 

John Davis

Subscriber
Age
58
Last Subscription Date
03/23/2019
I believe the valve cages and head are all one piece. Done on a lathe using a jig fixture. My dad can tell you more about it then I can. He is on this forum all the time and can tell what he did and the different types of material used. ;)
 

Elden DuRand

In Memory Of
Age
78
Last Subscription Date
12/22/2017
John:

Your Dad's skills are amazing. I have a question for him.

The cylinders and heads are grooved. I've always had a lot of trouble turning grooves. Chattering is the main problem.

Can your Dad offer any suggestions for the successful making of deep grooves?

Thanks in advance.

Take care - Elden:wave:
http://www.oldengine.org/members/durand
 

Heller D. Davis

Subscriber
Age
84
Otto, the valve towers and head are all one piece construction and the valve seats are alum-bronze material pressed in with .002 press fit.

---------- Post added at 09:39 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:31 AM ----------

Eldon, cutting grooves can be a bad experience some time. To get good grooves the Lathe needs to be good and tight and the tool needs to be sharp with proper relief and a tad below center-line of the part and use slow speed with plenty of coolant or cutting oil. Hand feed only. I use cutting oil applied with an acid brush while the cutter is engaged and cutting. I hold the brush on the part and the oil will be siphoned out with the heat from the cutting. Works for me most of the time. Those cylinders are made from L12 leaded steel and cuts like butter. Material type has a lot to do with how easy fins can be cut.
 

John Davis

Subscriber
Age
58
Last Subscription Date
03/23/2019
Elden,

My Father has three different lathes that he uses but most of his model work is done on a Monarch 10EE Precision tool room lathe. They are very heavy duty little lathes and you can still pick up used ones at a reasonable price. I have the same type lathe in my shop. He uses a old Van Norman milling machine that came out of a battle ship or aircraft carrier. It is also very heavy duty.
 

OTTO-Sawyer

Subscriber
Age
57
Last Subscription Date
07/15/2019
Otto, the valve towers and head are all one piece construction ....
Wow ! Even more impressed than I was before then.

Did you use a heavy duty boring bar on the O.D.s with a grooving tool, or how did you turn & groove the towers (what I called valve cages) without the opposing tower hitting the tool holder as it spun. Not much tool clearance down at the bottom of the V between them. Not to mention the angle it had to be chucked at.

Impressive work !
 
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