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10-20 Titan Project

Russ Hamm

Subscriber
Age
61
Last Subscription Date
10/12/2024
What do you guys think on paint? An old friend who remembers seeing these tractors new told me they were definately
the dark grey. This IH pic from the overhaul manual shows a medium grey in my thinking because of the pinstriping on the fenders, but not
too light because the stenciled lettering is light colored.s-l1600.jpg
 

Russ Hamm

Subscriber
Age
61
Last Subscription Date
10/12/2024
Last night I reworked the air horn on the mixer. The choke plate had been rusted down on the edges, it still worked but
I thought if I could make it seal off a little better we could give it a good drink at startup. Welded the edges, fit and weld some more, fit and
grind some more.
Also a pic of the air horn valve, spring loaded disc. The cylinder at intake is supposed to suck the disc down and let more air in and it is adjustable,
looking at the other one I had it looks like at some point the threaded adjustment end broke off so it is shorter than original, but I don't think
extremely. At rest the disc sits right at the bottom end of the throat. It never blocks air off completely but it is supposed to limit it some at rest.KIMG0764.JPGKIMG0765.JPGKIMG0763.JPG
 

Russ Hamm

Subscriber
Age
61
Last Subscription Date
10/12/2024
The block is coming off this weekend...…...hopefully. Looks like rain, would be a good time to do it. Found three local shops for sleeving so
far, waiting on pricing and availability. You can see the problem on number two cylinder in the pics, pretty bad pitting at the front end bottom.
At the time I guess we figured it would run, and it would, but finances are a little better now and I really think it should start a lot better.
Jerry tells me this, what do you guys think? He says he likes to bore the block, sleeve the piston and narrow the grooves for narrower rings as they cause less drag. He has mentioned this to me before, sounds like it works for him. Interesting.
Also a pic of sizes just for the heck of it, left to right 10-20 Titan, 22-36 MD, W-30 MD/ 10-20 MD, F-20/ farmall regular MD, F-12/F-14 MD.KIMG0770.JPGKIMG0771.JPGKIMG0776.JPG
 

AngrySailor

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/31/2020
Interesting about sleeving the piston... how is it retained? A thin section of cast will not like a press or heat shrink fit especially one that puts tension stress on it.
 

Russ Hamm

Subscriber
Age
61
Last Subscription Date
10/12/2024
Interesting about sleeving the piston... how is it retained? A thin section of cast will not like a press or heat shrink fit especially one that puts tension stress on it.
Im not sure how they do that, sounded like the piston is turned down, sleeved, cut for rings narrower like 1/4". Like you say, that would seem to leave sleeve "slices" in between the ring lands.
 

Rob Charles

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
04/05/2017
I believe when you sleeve a piston you only do the skirt.similar to when you spray weld a piston. You only weld the skirt area. This only works if you are going to maybe .060 over. Your pitting may or may not clean up at that.you would use thicker(radially) rings so they will still seal on the piston and make up for the bigger bore. The reason for only about .060 is the rings can only be so thick before they will break expanding them to install. That's what an engineer at Niagra piston rings co. told me..I wouldn't trust short little sections of sleeve between the ring lands to stay put. Especially since the groove under them is wider .Rob
 

AngrySailor

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/31/2020
It might be possible to machine the ring lands off completely then make a sleeve with a stepped id. That would allow you to machine ring grooves of whatever width you want. Depends how much material is in the crown area. I’m more thinking about the section thickness of the sleeve over the skirt though. If you bore over say an 1/8” to clean the bore and turn the entire piston an 1/8”, the sleeve over the piston will only be 1/8” wall. I don’t think you can shrink cast iron of that section thickness with enough interference to retain it on the piston without it splitting?

Another option if you want thinner rings might be ring spacers or even rings with a smaller OD as a spacer. Small enough that they’re snug on the piston and don’t ever contact the cylinder. I nearly did this on another project where I had a broken ring land was going to machine the entire land out then use three rings in the single wide groove. Two right on the piston, one sized for the bore. I found a decent piston before it came to that though.
 

Roger Byrne

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/01/2020
I don't see any reason to get into anything as questionable and expensive as sleeving the piston. Just have the block bored and sleeved by a good machine shop. Have the ring grooves trued and fit with a wider ring or rings. If you don't want the extra friction of wider rings, just get a spacer from your ring supplier and you're good to go.
 
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