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12 Hp. Dieter project

Harry Terpstra

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
Amazing piece of workmanship! You really go into details. I really like the way you build it.
 

Don Selmer

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/23/2019
Hi Paul, Nice work as usual and it’s good to see it on a cart instead of on the ground.
 

P Schmidt

Registered
Last Subscription Date
05/27/2018
Thank you Harry and Don, Still have a lot of work to do, looks like about 6' of stitching and a new conn. rod
 

Don Selmer

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/23/2019
Paul, Atleast you don’t have to look very far for a person who does a Great job at both of those things. By the way how is that Big OTTO coming?
 

P Schmidt

Registered
Last Subscription Date
05/27/2018
Don
The Otto will probably be next. Still gathering some pieces!!!!
 

LCJudge

Subscriber
Age
60
Last Subscription Date
12/14/2019
Nice video and great work on welding the rocker. That's the best way to repair cast iron! Question for you, what type flux did you use?
 

Kevin O. Pulver

Email NOT Working
Age
54
Last Subscription Date
02/14/2020
I had to make a pilot to grind the exh, valve seat. Used my larger seat grinder with a 3 1/2" stone
View attachment 389361View attachment 389362View attachment 389363
When I was grinding the valve seat for my 12 horse Hercules Champion I couldn't find any shop around that had a stone that big. I finally ended up gluing Emery cloth to the valve face with weatherstrip adhesive and spun it in with my drill. It was a little unorthodox but it worked okay. It's been starting and running well for about 15 years so I guess I couldn't ask for any more than that.
 

P Schmidt

Registered
Last Subscription Date
05/27/2018
Kevin, I can get up to a 4" stone, but my dresser will only handle 3 1/2 " I have 2 dressers, I am thinking about modifying one. Sounds like you did all right!
 

Martin Reed

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
08/19/2019
Kevin,
that is what I call the poor-man's valve job. I use sticky backed sanding disks you buy for angle grinders. I cut the disk up into squares that just fit the width of the valve face and stick between 5 and 6 per valve; obviously the larger the valve the more I can stick. I then use my chordless drill and chuck up on the valve stem and rotate the valve inside the seat. I do have the valve face ground before doing this so as to have a good surface to stick the sanding squares to. I also use a lathe live center that I push the valve into the valve seat to better grind the seat. I start out with 60 grit then work my way up to 320 grit. I then take the squares off completely and use fine lapping compound between the valve and seat to polish them together. I haven't had a leak valve yet; it takes much longer than a professional job but you run into size issues with auto machinist shops and if the valve guide is too worn they dont have pilots large enough.
 

Kevin O. Pulver

Email NOT Working
Age
54
Last Subscription Date
02/14/2020
Thank you Martin, That's essentially what I did but I used the yellow snotty looking 3M weatherstrip adhesive to glue the chunks of Emery cloth on the valve face.
I built the valves out of drill rod and thick steel discs that were hole sawed out of some project at the local welding shop.
It was for a 12 horse Hercules sold by Lininger Implement of Omaha and later turned into a log splitter. Actually we built the pushrod and the entire cylinder head and fuel mixer as well as the valves.
Glenn Karch let me share an article about it in the 2006 gas engine magazine.
https://www.gasengine.com/restoration/hercules-engine-news
 
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