• If you like antique engines, vintage tractors or old iron, please register and join us. When you register on Smokstak, give complete answers and fill in all blanks. Be Considerate, this is an application to JOIN Smokstak, therefore it becomes part of a decision to open the door to you or send you off to the dropout file. Place your City, State, Country in the location box and it will be compared to where the internet lookup utilities say that you are. Don't give me a zip code to look up, the Eject button is much easier. We get hundreds of applications, so there is not time for monkey business.

15 HP YH Fairbanks Rescue

PEIHitandmissguys

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/07/2020
In February of 2006 we were lucky enough to rescue this big beast.
Someone told me they thought there was a pump or something in this little building right in the middle of our small city, Charlottetown. I contacted the city and explained what we do and showed them some of our past projects and they quickly agreed that this was not being preserved and told us we could have it if we could get it out without touching the building. They even had city public works pump the building out while we recovered it. Needless to say we were keen to get at it before someone changed their mind.
It sat on its original base in a small pump house that fed water just across the valley to a cistern building. The pit was 8-10 feet below grade and there was only a 28” doorway up five steps to the living quarters and then up 4-5’ to the ground level. The ground was completely saturated with water so we couldn’t use any vehicles to recover. We used a small economy tractor and lawn tractor trailer to transport the pieces from the pump house to the parking lot.
We gathered gear and help from some friends and family, blew a track through the snow from the parking lot of the community center across a ballfield and away we went.
Nobody knows why it was in pieces with the small stuff in the living quarters of the pump house and the base in the pit. The doorway was too narrow to fit the base and wheels out and it was pretty heavy In one piece, so we removed the wheels, crank and base in pieces, winched up ramps to the living quarters and the winched out the door on to the small trailer then off to the big trailer. All the while two trash pumps were running flat out to keep the water at ankle depth.
After a very long Saturday and many trips we were loaded and ready for home. Eventually we got it reassembled and had it running a few times but not running great. Some governor troubles, scary seeing 4000# jumping off the pavement.F32FA39F-7120-4BE5-87C2-82AC058D1E8C.jpegBE5290B4-709F-4DED-915A-A63C9DA43BD3.jpegB41D4C45-842E-4765-9650-23A7F8EE7612.jpeg53AAC23C-E95F-47D8-86AD-6FB2237EFFEC.jpeg917BD3A7-43E6-448B-ACC3-48F3386CE59B.jpeg
We still have it and someday hope to spend more time fine tuning it.
 
Last edited:

PEIHitandmissguys

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/07/2020
Someday I’d like to have the pumping gear that went with it but that day there was wicked pressure still raging through the piping in the building. (February 2006)
 
Last edited:

Slocan Kid

Registered
Last Subscription Date
03/13/2011
In February of 2016 we were lucky enough to rescue this big beast.
Someone told me they thought there was a pump or something in this little building right in the middle of our small city, Charlottetown. I contacted the city and explained what we do and showed them some of our past projects and they quickly agreed that this was not being preserved and told us we could have it if we could get it out without touching the building. They even had city public works pump the building out while we recovered it. Needles to say we were keen to get at it before someone changed their mind.
It sat on its original base in a small pump house that fed water just across the valley to a cistern building. The pit was 8-10 feet below grade and there was only a 28” doorway up five steps to the living quarters and then up 4-5’ to the ground level. The ground was completely saturated with water so we couldn’t use any vehicles to recover. We used a small economy tractor and lawn tractor trailer to transport the pieces from the pump house to the parking lot.
We gathered gear and help from some friends and family, blew a track through the snow from the parking lot of the community center across a ballfield and away we went.
Nobody knows why it was in pieces with the small stuff in the living quarters of the pump house and the base in the pit. The doorway was too narrow to fit the base and wheels out and it was pretty heavy In one piece, so we removed the wheels, crank and base in pieces, winched up ramps to the living quarters and the winched out the door on to the small trailer then off to the big trailer. All the while two trash pumps were running flat out to keep the water at ankle depth.
After a very long Saturday and many trips we were loaded and ready for home. Eventually we got it reassembled and had it running a few times but not running great. Some governor troubles, scary seeing 4000# jumping off the pavement.
We still have it and someday hope to spend more time fine tuning it.View attachment 380126View attachment 380127View attachment 380128View attachment 380129View attachment 380130
Nice work boys
 

AngrySailor

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/31/2020
Nice job! I was wondering if you have a list of shows/dates for this summer on the island? I’m planning my time off from working away and would like to attend as many as possible. I’ll be attending the West Point VFF show for sure but not sure of any others and when.
 

PEIHitandmissguys

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/07/2020
Obviously we had no idea what we were doing! We were turning it over with a belt on a tractor and had no idea how hot to heat the head.
Any chance you have plans or detailed photos of your starting torch?
 

Harry

Administrator
Staff member
I have the starting torch, but it will take time for me to get photos. The torch is a vertical kerosene blowtorch. They are around on eBay. etc. but they are scarce as hen's teeth.

Don't overheat your starting hot tube. The kerosene torch is designed to provide just the right amount of heat and it can be turned off once the engine has started and has run long enough for the larger tube to take over. There are two hot tubes and one is a threaded special metal tube that screws into the combustion chamber. The other is like a cut 1/2 piece of iron pipe affixed in the combustion chamber. This one is for running and it maintains its own heat from the running engine.

Run the video and an expert will show you how. He has fashioned a replacement heater that runs on propane.


You can watch FULL SCREEN by clicking the square in the lower right.

From the manual, HOW TO START "Y," TWO-CYCLE OIL ENGINES:

Before lighting the torch to start the engine, see that all the water jackets are completely filled. Is this is neglected, it will surely result in broken cylinder heads and combustion chambers.

Light the kerosene torch in the usual way, according to the instructions sent with it. While it is being generated the engine may be inspected and arranged to start.

See that the lubricating oil reservoir on top of the crankcase is nearly full of. oil, using a good grade of high fire test gas engine cylinder oil.

In cold weather, care must be taken that the oil is not so cold that it will not flow. This can be seen by cranking the oiler by hand and watching the discharge. If the oil is too cold, it must be warmed. Some oil flows at lower temperatures than others.

It is necessary to turn the crank of the oiler a number of revolutions to see that the oiler feeds properly, and to fill the lubricating pipes, which may have drained while the engine was shut down. See that the lubricating cup on the governor arm bearing is filled and in working order.

See that the auxiliary fuel reservoir is at least half full. If not, or as in the case of the first start, it can be filled and the fuel supply pump primed at the same time by pouring fuel directly into the reservoir, using the funnel and measure furnished with the engine. In the case of extremely cold weather, when using very heavy fuel oil, this priming may be done with kerosene, which will shorten the time necessary to start. If water collects in this reservoir it should be drained away. A drain plug is supplied for this purpose and also for use in flushing the reservoir at times.

A screen is provided in the suction line to the injection pump as a safeguard against the entrance of dirt to the pump, and a similar one in the suction line of the auxiliary fuel pump. These screens should be kept clean. A good method is to remove the screen plugs and pour kerosene through them.

Work the injection pump two or three strokes by hand. With a little practice, one can tell by the "feel" whether this pump is properly primed and its discharge pipe full of oil. If they are not, the union joints may be loosened and the oil worked through to the delivery pipe. This will seldom be necessary, except after having overhauled or cleaned out the pump and parts.

Observe the operation of the torch, adjusting it to give a hot blue flame. If the torch is set too close to the surface of the cap, a flame will project above the top opening of the cover. The mouth of the burner should be set about 3" from the starting tube.

Oil the rocker arm pins, and the pins of the governor carrying the governor spring.

The engine will be ready to start after about 8 to 10 minutes of heating the cap, and when the starting tube which projects from the cap shows red. At this time turn the flywheel until the piston is on the head end dead center, which can be told by the suction or discharge of air through the relief cock in the head. (In this position the key seat in the crankshaft will be straight up.) Give the injection pump two or three short strokes by hand, and turn the fly-wheel nearly one-half turn in the direction of rotation of the engine (engine runs over) with the relief cock open. Close the relief cock and then turn the fly-wheel sharply back against compression, being careful to grasp the proper arm of the fly-wheel so it can be released without danger to the operator when the explosion occurs.

The engine should then start in its proper direction. It may be advantageous to give one or two more strokes of the oil pump by hand, or in some cases to check the pump by hand, but the engine will automatically be giving the pump its maximum stroke, and if the pump is in order this will usually be sufficient.

A little experience in starting will soon prompt the operator as to the desired quantity of fuel to pump by hand. If the engine is flooded with fuel it will usually refuse to ignite, or will rock back and forth without completing a revolution. In that case, the injection pump, to prevent the introduction of more fuel, should be locked as when stopping the engine. The engine should then be turned over a few revolutions with the relief cock open to vent the excess fuel. To start an engine which has been running and is very hot all over will require a little judgment on the part of the operator in order not to flood it with fuel.

Make sure that the cylinder jacket is filled with water. Its flow may be temporarily restricted, or even stopped altogether, till the jacket becomes warm, but after that, the outlet water thermometer should be the sole guide to the cooling. The thermometer should be so inserted in the outlet water jacket line that its bulb end is at all times submerged in water, and not in an air pocket.

If the load comes on the engine immediately after starting, the torch can be removed at the same time. Otherwise at light loads it should not be extinguished until the engine operates with quite regular ignitions.

 

Ken Majeski

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/10/2019
I do have an original torch but it needs some work. I made a
burner out of a piece of 1 inch pipe and use propane. It takes about 10 minutes and the head should be quite warm and the starting tube be a soft red. Some try to use a acetylene torch and this results in a melted starting tube 😵
 
Top