150 Case Thoughts

Beth V

Moderator
Hopefully, we can discuss the 150 Case professionally & not allow this thread to get hijacked into nastiness (Yes, Lippy, I am pointing my mouse at you!...the Master Moderator has his finger on the Delete button....)

I've seen this picture many times over the years and am curious of it's origins. This particular picture is a picture of the picture as taken by LeRoy Blaker.

Who can tell us more and possibly supply real photos of the 150? I continue to hear rumors/facts that one is in process, but until then how does it compare to the 110 (other than it didn't hold up?)

I'm not looking to see how it compared the the 40 Reeves; 40 Gaar Scott, etc.

Thanks
Beth
 

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Mike in NC

Moderator
I don't know anything about the 150 except I saw the boiler to one at the Case Expo at Rough & Tumble many years ago.
 

Lippy

Agitator
I think Briden owns part of a 150 boiler. If memory serves me correctly it didn’t UT well. Don’t worry Beth; Contrary to public belief I do have the ability to get poked without retaliating! Great thread…

Lippy:wave:
 

Beth V

Moderator
Aside of the boiler that Hedtke had, what other parts remain?

How do they compare to the 110's? Are any interchangable?

We always hear about "piles of parts."

Thanks!
Beth
 
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MoRo

Subscriber
I dunno, but that pic you show is of one fine lookin' piece of machinery! Wish I could see one in action.
 

Mike McKnight

Active member
Beth,
As near as I've heard, there are no other 150 parts left. I've heard the rumors of the engine that survived until later, and the wheels/gears that were scrapped by Case in the '50's or so....shame not enough is left to assemble one, one would look cool at a show somewhere.

I'm interested myself to hear if any 110 or 150 parts would interchange. I'm guessing not much? :confused:

Mike
 

Kory65

Email NOT Working
Mike,

There are some parts that they kept using on the 32's and 110's. Mostly smaller parts like oil cup covers, crosshead shoes, valve nuts and drawblocks, and some parts in the differential. Probably around 10-15 parts that are similar.
 

Beth V

Moderator
I seem to recall something about one buried in Arizona.

Chuck, do you have it cataloged in your IMA articles?

Thanks
Beth
 

Rumely7106

New member
When I was in the Air Force at Tucson Az. i had heard stories about one being in an old mine out there but i always thought it was just a case of misidentity. I never knew for sure but thought i was a cool story!!!
 

Beth V

Moderator
When I was in the Air Force at Tucson Az. i had heard stories about one being in an old mine out there but i always thought it was just a case of misidentity. I never knew for sure but thought i was a cool story!!!
Yep, that is the story I recall hearing. Does anyone know if there is a molecule of truth to it?

Beth
 

Colin

New member
Nothing left of the 150 except for the boiler. Justin Hingeon and others seen and knew there was enough parts at the factory still in the 60s to build one. He went and tried to get this boiler. i have no idea how long it took him to get it but in the mean time all the parts got scraped at Racine in 67 i believe:rant: dont know WHAT they were thinking to not get the parts immediately.:bonk:
I dont think there's one part that would interchange between a 110 and 150. they were pretty well two different engines. we have lots of letters here from the field to the factory on the 150s. and in them they talk about different problems on it. mainly with things being light or burning out. remember how all Case engines back then were not really beefed up like the later ones. like comparing a 1904 25 to a 1912 75, lots of differences. they could have beefed it up with another 10 ton of iron to make it successful. but eventually the guys in the field and engineers were saying they should build a scaled down version, the 110. the 110 was improved with a intermediate gear shaft, heavy gearing for its size and a large differential to slow it down for starters.
that picture Beth posted is good. id love to stand there and study how all that top stuff works. but all we have now is the top view blue print and you have to study that quite a bit to figure out how low gear is cogged in, and hi gear runs off the clutch arm. so think when in low gear the clutch arm was freewheeling in the flywheel. the power steering runs through 3 gears as well, and i have no idea which way you pull the lever to go left or right yet:crazy:
in Beths picture you can see how the clutch lever placed backwards and the reverse lever is over to the right and not hooked up directly. theres just one power steering lever with a knob to lock it in one spot. not sure how that would work most guys steer a 110 like they are stirring soup, back and forth.
Kory will have to jump in here. hes got the full set of prints now and has been analyzing them alot:brows:
 
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Farquhar

Active member
Seems I heard once upon a time, that there was a 150 Case in, or near Waukesha, Wi, or at least it would be, with about 250 mawp.
Is that true Chuck??:rolleyes: :D
 

Chuck Sindelar

In Memory Of
Nothing left of the 150 except for the boiler. Justin Hingeon and others seen and knew there was enough parts at the factory still in the 60s to build one. He went and tried to get this boiler. i have no idea how long it took him to get it but in the mean time all the parts got scraped at Racine in 67 i believe:rant: dont know WHAT they were thinking to not get the parts immediately.:bonk:
I dont think there's one part that would interchange between a 110 and 150. they were pretty well two different engines. we have lots of letters here from the field to the factory on the 150s. and in them they talk about different problems on it. mainly with things being light or burning out. remember how all Case engines back then were not really beefed up like the later ones. like comparing a 1904 25 to a 1912 75, lots of differences. they could have beefed it up with another 10 ton of iron to make it successful. but eventually the guys in the field and engineers were saying they should build a scaled down version, the 110. the 110 was improved with a intermediate gear shaft, heavy gearing for its size and a large differential to slow it down for starters.
that picture beth posted is good. id love to stand there and study how all that top stuff works. but all we have no is the top view blue print and you have to study that quite a bit to figure out how low gear is cogged in, and hi gear runs off the clutch arm. so think when in low gear the clutch arm was freewheeling in the flywheel. the power steering runs through 3 gears as well, and i have no idea which way you pull the lever to go left or right yet:crazy:
in Beths picture you can see how the clutch lever placed backwards and the reverse lever is over to the right and not hooked up directly. theres just one power steering lever with a knob to lock it in one spot. not sure how that would work most guys steer a 110 like they are stirring soup, back and forth.
Kory will have to jump in here. hes got the full set of prints not and has been analyzing them alot:brows:
Colin,

I have never heard that there were enough parts in Racine still into the '60s to build one. If that is not published somewhere in a very reliable spot, I think it likely is not true. What does seem to be true is----After giving problems in the field, some of then had been returned to the factory. At least two of these (16148, & 16152) were converted at the factory into skid BOILERS, and sent back out again in 1/4/1908 and 10/13/1910). What I recall reading somewhere (that I can not re-locate right now) is-----the only parts that were seen later (when???) at the factory was maybe wheels and a bit more (bull gears??) likely left over from one of the tractions being stripped and resold as a skid boiler. It sometimes is not easy to seperate fact from fiction. But what we do know to be true, taken directly from the orig. Case factory records--ONLY three of these were for sure built as tractions! #s14666, 16148, and 16152. One more, #17162 is unclear in the orig. Case factory records as to exactly what it was, traction or a mere skid boiler, or? The records are quite clear that 7 of this size left the factory as skid boilers, with no engines (or even wheels) on them (#s 18547, 548, 549, 18723, 848, 870, & 871). For most of us, a mere skid boiler (of any size or make) will not hold our interest for very long. Being they only made 3, and possibly 4 of this size as engines, they can hardly be considered as much more than experimental, and it does not stand up to reason that they would have kept much in the way of parts on hand for them. After 1910, only one, (14666) still existed as an engine ( and a possibility of maybe a second one?? (#17162) It defies logic that 50 years later (into the 1960s) there would still have been enough parts on hand to build another one
chuck
 

Chuck Sindelar

In Memory Of
Seems I heard once upon a time, that there was a 150 Case in, or near Waukesha, Wi, or at least it would be, with about 250 mawp.
Is that true Chuck??:rolleyes: :D
It is entirely possible that my boiler would hold 250psi, but I am not sure how much she would pull on a dyno at that pressure. I am sure that I am not going to try that any time soon. That is a gamble that I am just not willing to take. But if and when she does blow, I'd bet the farm that it will not be the three row lap that will fail first!
chuck
 
I don't know how many of you own the book, Steam, Grain and Sawdust, by my late friend Slim Rennewanz, but he tells in there about standing on one near Waubon, Minnesota in, I believe, the 1930s. He had a little tendency to sensationalize and embelish, as he could tell a good story, but he had me convinced he was "the only living person to have stood on a '150' hp Case" when he told me the story at Belgrade, Montana in about 1990.
Gary;)
 

Beth V

Moderator
Chuck raises some interesting points. Part of the reason that I initiated this thread was to learn more about the legendary 150 Case. It's legacy is increased because there are not any left and those that may have used one are gone.

Therefore, what documentation is available? Lots of stories exist, but where are the pictures and reports? Colin refers to letters from the field to the factory. Can you share some exerpts?

I'm still curious if anyone can shed some light on Blaker's picture. Is it a picture he saw at the factory or where? Does anyone else have one or recall seeing it? Blaker took pictures of other pictures and cropped some to make them look like he originated them.

As for boiler pressure.....that generation was just as competitive as we are and I'm sure they pushed the limit whenever they could.....:brows: I'm still looking for factual information.

Thanks
Beth
 

Jeff Smith

Subscriber
That safety valve and gauge look tiny in that photo.................but I'm sure if I dropped it on my foot I would feel it!

Jeff
 
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