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16hp Allan "Portable" oil engine #1405 restoration

Gavin Organ

Registered
Hi Gavin,
Great restoration of a nice engine, just wondering what you used to blast the paint off and leave the filler underneath. Looking forward to seeing it run.
Cheers Justin
Hi Justin,
It was a painful and slow process of using one of those small pot blasters with garnet at about 80 to 90 psi and just keeping up a quick sweeping motion just trying to take off a layer at a time.
Garnet consumption was high as the efficiency was down but I wanted to preserve as much of the original patina as I could.. I did first try paint stripper but unfortunately paint stripper only worked so far, as they used a red oxide undercoat.
I tried about 3 types of stripper and none would budge it, so it had to be blasted..
Cheers Gavin.
 

cobbadog

Registered
Garnet is effective and dear, I have a small blasting cabinet and have kept the garnet in a big plastic bucket and gone to using glass beads which are more gentle and so far have been lasting quite well.
When I had the tractor blasted by a mobile sand blaster he used a product similar to garnet but he called it something else but when he did allow and tin ware he went over to a glass based abrasive similar to look at as sand but was definitely glass. This stuff worked a treat plus it is economical to buy and as he buys it in bulk he sold me a 20kg bag for $15.00. So this is something else to try or look for on any other projects.
 

Gavin Organ

Registered
Garnet is effective and dear, I have a small blasting cabinet and have kept the garnet in a big plastic bucket and gone to using glass beads which are more gentle and so far have been lasting quite well.
When I had the tractor blasted by a mobile sand blaster he used a product similar to garnet but he called it something else but when he did allow and tin ware he went over to a glass based abrasive similar to look at as sand but was definitely glass. This stuff worked a treat plus it is economical to buy and as he buys it in bulk he sold me a 20kg bag for $15.00. So this is something else to try or look for on any other projects.
Hi Cobbadog,
Yeah I've tried a few medias in the past but find Garnet the best all round and most economical solution.. but obviously you have to get 3 or 4 runs through the gun to get the biggest bang for your buck.. I have looked down the road of glass shot but was told by a fellow who ran it in his blasting unit, you only tend to get one good run on it and its not real good on heavy rusted stuff I steered clear of it.. interesting you said you were buying it cheaper than garnet though, as when I looked at it, it was probably one third more than the price of garnet... your mate must have a good supplier 👌😊
I did try a bit of bi carb I had left but it doesn't like my setup and I always have had poor results with it..
You are correct though about the Alloys and tinware garnet tends to be a bit harsh.. Ive heard walnut is also good for these...
 

cobbadog

Registered
I've never tried the bi-carb but have seen great results on alloy and is real good iside a carby as the fuel disolves it. The glass beads also do a brilliant job on alloy too.
 

freshieslures

Registered
Hi Justin,
It was a painful and slow process of using one of those small pot blasters with garnet at about 80 to 90 psi and just keeping up a quick sweeping motion just trying to take off a layer at a time.
Garnet consumption was high as the efficiency was down but I wanted to preserve as much of the original patina as I could.. I did first try paint stripper but unfortunately paint stripper only worked so far, as they used a red oxide undercoat.
I tried about 3 types of stripper and none would budge it, so it had to be blasted..
Cheers Gavin.
Hi Gavin,
I've had a similar problem with a painted engine that also is under coated with red oxide. The paint stripper works on the top coat only, but I never want to blast it in case I damaged what's underneath. I don't like buying painted engines as it's so much extra work to strip them, (unless it's a 16 hp Allan) blasting looks like the way to go.
Justin
 

cobbadog

Registered
I have found that blasting is a good way to go. The only issue is the choice of grit, soda or shells to use. SO it is best to do what we do, talk about what we have done and the results and most of all ask the blaster what his thoughts are to achieve the finish that you want.
 

Inter Bloke

Registered
I've had good results with Bi Carb.
My nephew used "soda blasting" extensively during the restoration of his HT Monaro coupe, and I was amazed at the lack of pitting and damage caused by the blasting process, because in the media blasting "I" have had done,there is always some damage caused by the process itself !!!
 
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