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1910 Rumely on ebay

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Casemaker

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that one looks just like #6215 which was a 1911 model 20hp. This one should have the wet bottom and sloping side firebox as well. They are easy steamers because the flues are not real long and there is several of them.
 

Mike McKnight

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Anyone noticed how they mentioned a "cold test" (which I think means "cold water test".....) How could that be performed with that much scale hanging out of the front tube sheet hand hole?:uhoh:
Mike
 

Craig A

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68
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12/20/2015
I grabbed a pic took a closer look at a drive pinion............looks pretty good too...............
 

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Sawyer-Massey 11-22

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Age
64
Mike: I did not notice the "cold test", but did see the scale. Would appear to have not been washed out for sometime, if at all:eek: .

Robert
 

Peter

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Last Subscription Date
11/14/2013
This looks pretty good, but I would caution any potential bidders. Would be wise to go look in person, or have it looked at. Ask more about the ultrasound numbers. He mentioned the firebox, I would also be concerned about the bottom of the barrel and bottom sheet under the firebox. The lower rivets may need replacement on the flue sheet, but unless you look, hard to see. The bottom of the flue sheet maybe a thinning problem. Bottom line, there is no way you can make an intelligent bid againt the crazy ebay mentality without knowing what your bidding on. You can ask, there is no rule that the reserve must be a secret. Worth asking bofore you spend a weekend and 200 gallons on gas for nothing. The seller has a feedback of "1" and high bidder has a feedback "0", no biggie, but this guy is new to ebay and that just another reason to ask lots of questions. Politely as you can perhaps make sure this guy is not going to pull the listing and make a side deal and waste your time and gas. I really wish i could persue this, but the situation at work, I'd be unemployed for sure if I take off after this now.
 
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KGC1615

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12/27/2018
Just for giggles and grins, I requested the ultrasound results and asked how high their cold water test was and if there were any leaks. We'll see what happens.
Tom:D
 

Colin

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11/13/2013
looks like a decent engine :brows: it says the trasmission is in good shape:D
 

Beth V

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Last Subscription Date
03/03/2018
Maybe I am cynical....but, the presentation of the seller makes me nervous! "transmission...tracks?" I would be curious to see who from the "Rumely Owners Club" actually looked at it.

Does anyone know the engine or where it has been? I see the tanks have 18 hp painted on them.

Good discussion item, though!

Beth
 

JLBroadhead

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Last Subscription Date
12/01/2018
yes it is important when buying a traction engine to choose one with a good transmission but it also comes with pre cut oak to rebuild the CAB!!!!!!!!
 

Peter

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Last Subscription Date
11/14/2013
I think I know something about ebay and a bit about steam traction engines, if any of you are serious about this here is another 2c.

I think you are all right to have your antenna way up high when you see zero feedback seller and bidder. But, with all due respect, this is not your typical baseball card collection selling on ebay. The seller sounding funny is a secondary concern. One should really go look at the boiler. How can i say this? The engine may sell for 10k. It might be up an steaming a week later or might need 1000 to 20,000 in repairs. may never steam in the buyers life time. I know there are some wack job bidders on ebay, but the average steam guy is lucky to buy one traction engine and cannot afford a 10k mistake. There are some wealthy folks out there and thats great. I wish to be one my self someday. But for the vast majority, you just dont buy a boiler based on some photos, unless its real cheep. And, this engine is not going cheep, and you can be sure some bidders will be doing an inspection and bidding accordingly.

If you are lucky to win it would be wise to get a notarized bill of sale and to supervise the loading of the engine. Its rare that a seller offers to assist in transport. Thats a big plus. Its not so rare for an engine to be damaged in loading.

The fact the seller is not a steam person is not bad either. In fact it might be a plus, the engine is for sale afterall. The engine looks great its a question of boiler condition and the luck of ebay.

Damn, I wish I could get some time off here.......
 

Sawyer-Massey 11-22

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Age
64
Beth Vanarsdall said:
Good discussion item, though!!

Beth, my intent only, purely discussion:) . Not in the market for an engine, and certainly would not buy one off of ebay.

Peter, you made very good points as well.

Robert
 

casesteam12

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Age
52
Last Subscription Date
01/05/2009
Would that also be a lap seam boiler? Another thing to think about. I emailed him. It shows he is in central IN. If he is close and I have the time I will let everyone know the overall conditions.
 

Beth V

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Last Subscription Date
03/03/2018
Sawyer-Massey 11-22 said:
Beth Vanarsdall said:
Good discussion item, though!!

Beth, my intent only, purely discussion:) . Not in the market for an engine, and certainly would not buy one off of ebay.

Peter, you made very good points as well.

Robert
...and it worked!! I agree, that before placing a bid, I would look the engine over carefully, unless I had access to unlimited funds and was ready for a large project!

Beth
 

Ken Majeski

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Last Subscription Date
12/10/2019
Well... Besides the obvious problems with UT results (Sure is nice to know there are no cracks) and condition of the smokebox and the recent problems with Fraud and Hijacked accounts and the limeted feedback I wouldn't bid at all unless I saw it and talked to the owner in Person....
 
D

Don B. in KS

Guest
If they have actually pumped that boiler to 250 psi I am more than a little spooked! Rumely only pumped to 200 according to the info in Cat. #57 (1910) which was a 150% test. They are at a 200% test if every piece is as new and I somehow don't expect that it is. I wouldn't want to lay down a nickle on that engine unless people I new who were not in love with it had given it a good looking over and even then with what appears to need to be done in the photos I wouldn't want much more in it than it currently has bid. By the way, the single Rumelys and all the doubles other than the big plowing engines were a wet bottom lap seam. I don't have a thing against a lap but some jurisdictions are goosey as can be about them and I sure wouldn't want to be stuck with one in a state where it could only be allowed to be a glorified water heater.
Oak is a nice furniture wood but since the canopy is supposed to be painted red I can think of other woods I like better. When we redid mine we built it out of hickory, elm and pine and I've had no complaints.
 

Mark Thompson

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Age
57
Last Subscription Date
03/04/2009
I have personally seen this engine. It has been for sale a long time in Rumely country and it finally ends up on ebay.

It is a wet bottom, lap seam engine.

Boiler repairman Bobby Gold has seen this boiler and could give a straight up evaluation.

I can say the gearing is good. The rest needs a serious evaluation by the prospective buyer.

-Mark Thompson
 

Casemaker

Registered
I will say that I owned Rumely #6215 which was a 1911 20 hp just like this one. To say that that engine educated me about boiler condition would be an understatement. First of all when that engine was new the boiler was build thin - I think 5/16 ? When I got it in 1984 it had been patched two different areas in the firebox (real old time patches). They used square head bolts around the edge of plates 3/8 thick and used copper as the gasket. One patch was covering a split in the boiler plate and the other was over the top of a leaking stay bolt. The front flue sheet had been patched - but it looked like a home made repair and was not done well at all. It did carry 100 pounds of steam after doing some proper repairing. I sold that engine in 1989 to have a 1/2 scale Case built. Since then the boiler barrel above the pedestal has gone bad and the outside fire box is thin beneath the barrel. I believe that it has be torn down for a number of years now. I know that this engine could be in lots better condition then mine but when you dont have much to start out with when new it makes you wonder what 95 years has done to it. If I could buy back my old Rumely - I most likely would and hope that I could have a new boiler built for it. Would it be the most sensible thing to do - most likely not.
 

Alan New

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Age
65
Last Subscription Date
12/28/2009
The engine was purchased at an auction in Illinois in the 80's by a friend of mine in Indianapolis. It had been shown not long before he got it. His health deteriorated soon after he got it, so he never ran it. I helped him work on it a little from time to time. He finanlly sold it to a auctioneer who knew nothing about it, but wanted to make a buck on it. He advertized it for years at way too much money. I have no idea who owns it now, or who put it on Ebay. It's basically a good engine, but as suggested, anyone bidding on it should look at it very carefully. I know the crosshead pump and some other parts were lost at one point. Bob Gold is the one to talk to about the boiler.
 

Ken Majeski

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Last Subscription Date
12/10/2019
There are a couple of this style engine in this area. These are a halfway double riveted lap seam with one row of rivets double spaced. I don't know what to call this type of seam as far as pressure calculations are concerened. I don't believe either engine has ran in public since Wis. began requiring UT testing. There have been some surprises after UT has been done. :eek:
 
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