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1924 Allis Chalmers 20-35 Longfender

Paul Roidt

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/17/2019
Here is our 1924 Longfender when I brought it home in 2006.



I moved it into the shop latter that year to begin restoration.

http://www.smokstak.com/gallery/files/1/1/8/4/3/longfender.jpg

As you can see she needed quite a bit of work, but I was just happy that it was ours.

The first part I built was the starting pawl as seen below.



The hunt for parts began and in a fairly short time rear wheels were acquired from Pennsylvania, fenders from Ohio, front wheels, and radiator with a tractor from Missouri. The radiator turned out not to be usable, but the tractor turned out to be a Greyhound, so it all turned out Ok.

So far we have completed the short block for the engine, rebuilt most of the front axle, and started on building a new radiator.

Paul
 
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Paul Roidt

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/17/2019
When I went to pick up the tractor from Larry Swenson, we looked it over during loading a were impressed how little wear there was on the drawbar. We thought it may not have been used real hard.

The front axle proved that wrong.

The king pins, spindles, and axle was all wore out.

I built new king pins to fit the bored axle, and installed bronze bushings in the spindles.







 

Paul Roidt

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/17/2019
The rear pivot for the front axle was also quite wore out. So far we have been lucky that most of the repaired items have been able to be bored oversize an a new pin or bolt made to fit.






More latter if there is interest.

Paul
 

SproutW

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/13/2013
Great job on the front end. You want to rebuild my Titan spindles and wheel hubs...
 
R

Richard Sturdy

Guest
It's wonderful to see such a great old tractor being brought back to life. The long wing 20-35's are very hard to find over on this side of the pond.

Tricky Dickie
 

Joseph Cissell

Registered
Last Subscription Date
01/07/2017
Paul, It looks like you are doing and outstanding job of restoration on the Allis. I like to see that kind of work on these all antiqus Tractors and Old Gas Engines. Keep us informed on your progress and good lucky. Joe
 

ajs2744TC

Registered
Paul we spoke before, still trying to get some pics of the tractor at its 50 yr resting place for you. I have found them and its a matter of scanning them or snail mail to you. My cousin is very happy his old dream didn't get parted out. Thanks very much!!!:)He was a little afraid of that when Larry picked it up. Like I said the 18-30 in the pics went to John in Crosby. :cool: Maybe you can msg me your address.
 

Brothers Clemens

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/08/2018
Paul,

A huge new adventure.
Its going to looke wonderful of what you are doing.
Keep us up to date.

And if you need some information.
Yust let us know.

Thanks for posting and maby you vizit Holland soon.

You are welkom:wave:
Chris and Henric
 

Phil Johnson

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
Nice to see another Long Fender Allis coming back to life, Paul. Very nice work so far:)
 

Rick Schmitz

Registered
Age
47
Last Subscription Date
08/12/2011
According to the allis chalmers data book 1900 long fenders were made from the years 1923 - 1926, and then in 1927 they shortend the fenders from 12 inches below the rear axle to 10 inches above as an atempt to save money:confused:

For the 1927's and on they also made the operators platform smaller, widend the hood, redesigned the clutch assembly, and painted the wheels green like the rest of the tractor.

Good luck on your restoration!;)
 

Paul Roidt

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/17/2019
Thanks,

Sprout, I have been watching your progress, you are doing a very through job. Those Titans are interesting tractors.

Richard, I like the "Long Wing" description, I may start using it.

Joe, Phil thanks it is been a slow road, but I don't get in big hurry very often.

ajs2744TC, I was very excited when you PM'd me with history of our tractor. It is to bad that your cousin had to sell it, but it's in good hands. I will PM you my address.

Brothers, YES I will visit Holland. I purchased an airline ticket and will arrive on Sept 10. I have not finished planning the trip yet, so I only know I will attend the AC Event on the 11th, and have to fly home from London on the 17th. I will contact you for some more ideas. I would also like to try to meet Richard also.

Thanks Paul
 

Paul Roidt

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/17/2019
The engine was stuck, penetrating fluid would run through the rear two cylinders, but the front two were very rusted.



The lower end was in good shape, other than being out of shims for bearing adjustment, at least it was not rusty.



The gear train was worn out, the nose of the crank and key seat very worn, and we had to press out two pistons and three sleeves. But we got it a part with out destroying any important parts. Thought we would be able to bore the sleeves but they were either cracked in the flanged or pitted so badly near the lower seal that we could not use them.





Thanks Paul
 
R

Richard Sturdy

Guest
Hey Paul, I may be able to make it to Holland for the AC event. If not and if you have time, you should visit England on your way back.

Tricky Dickie
 

Craig A

Moderator
Staff member
Age
68
Last Subscription Date
12/20/2015
Paul.......besides the fenders what differentiates this tractor from later 20-35's?
 

Paul Roidt

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/17/2019
Richard I plan on spending some time in England also.

Craig,

Some of the differences are, Of course the fenders, hood and radiator. Including the brackets and frame work that they attach to.

Longfender tractors are longer than short fenders in over all length. Some think it is because of a longer transmission housing and have seen it printed as such. But it is because the operator platform is farther rearward on a Longfender. There is no real difference in the housings that I know of, except for maybe updates over the years.

The wheels front and rear differ, the short fender rear wheels are made of lighter formed steel, rather than 1/2 inch thick plate on the longfender.

Front axle, air filters and fuel tanks are different.

Exhaust manifold are basically the same, the long fenders had three piece, with clamps between the sections, with flange mount for an exhaust pipe adapter. Short fenders use a one piece manifold, with a slide over pipe.

Intake manifold have a slight dip in the middle were the intake tube splits on the longfenders, and is straight on the shorts.

Cylinder heads were also different, Early heads used four valve covers per engine, and latter ones used two.

There are differences in the oiling systems over the years also.

I think that is most of it, the blocks and rear housing however really do not change to much other than updates through the years to make them better. The basic design was in production from 1919 to 1936, and latter for power unit engines, so there are a lot of update changes, I will call them. The earliest casting number we have is in our longfender of 12, and the latest I believe is in the 50's in a power unit.

Paul
 

Paul Roidt

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/17/2019
This a testament to how GREAT the Stak is. I knew very little history of our tractor until Adam (ajs2744TC) found some picture here of a tractor he and his cousin once owned.

Here is copy of a PM from him.

Paul, I hope you enjoy the photos and I will get them out asap. They were taken about 6-7 years ago and not a high quality camera. unfortunately just when we pulled them out of the hole there was no one to snap picture, it was winter cold and dark. so I only have a mental pic of the D17 pulling each one out. yours was blocking the 18-30 so I busted ass to get it out first so that when hard winter hit it wasn't stuck for months. Believe it or not we hauled it with about two feet of dirt and animal bones froze onto it, the 18-30 thawed a bit better. it was rolling! you will see in the pic all the stuff this man had. His name was Ray Hansen and he farmed with the 20-35 up until the 50's and when the cutoff rubber went bad he went to buffalo ND to get the 18-30 for the wheels and never put them on it due to a JD R purchase. So the tractors both sat under an oak tree until 2004-05. My dad found them back in the 80's but the price was way to high for them then. (Ray figured everything from the wheelbarrow to an old toaster was worth 3,000 dollars.) standard price so not much left there including the JD R diesel. At that time he didn't realize the difference really in the two tractors. So as far as I know your tractor farmed near Ponsford,MN most to all of its life. I was going to keep the 18-30 but due to sudden job loss and a good offer and a lack of interest from any one else I sold it to my friend John Tysse for a little financial help. And your s was sold by my cousin during his divorce or just before it. I do not have any old original farm photos of your tractor. Ray lived in an old cookshack, never bathed and was soot black head to toe. But he was very unique and had a large stash of goods. He wanted me to remove the tractors asap and I am glad, He passed on about 7 months later and his place got scrapped. lots of history and storys lost for eternity. I will miss visiting him. Perhaps someday we can meet and I will check out the allis and I might bring my cousin down to a show and I can fill you with a bit more but thats about all I can recall, Never thought i would see the 20-35 again. And yes I still stew over the 18-30 when I see it in Johns shop not mine..lol..


Thank again.

Paul
 

SproutW

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/13/2013
I'm assuming finding replacement sleeves will be difficult. You plan on having new sleeves made? Sucks to hear you are out of shims on your babbit bearings. One thing I'd like to learn, is to pour my own babbit bearings. Great work getting the sleeves/pistons separated from the block without damage.
 
R

Richard Sturdy

Guest
Norm Meinert lists 4 3/4", 5" and 5 1/4" sleeves for the big Allis tractors. They are quite expensive, but if you need them, then you need them :shrug: and that wonderful old tractor is surely worth a set of sleeves! Let me know when you are coming to England Paul and we'll meet up.

Tricky Dickie
 
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