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1927 20-35 Allis Chalmers

Jacob WI

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/15/2019
Hi all!

I've been slacking on keeping this post updated, sorry...

Let's get you caught up.
I made a quick trip back to WI last weekend to pick up my engine from the machine shop. With the sleeves bored for the 5" pistons, the crank ground, the cam polished, all the bearing gone through and refit, and the rotating assembly all assembled at the machine shop, we can take over now. The heads were not quite done yet, so we'll have to get them another trip.
But the engine is back in our garage, and I couldn't be happier!


The new set of used lifters was resurfaced as well.


My Mag is with Matt Scott being gone through.

unfortunately the main case was damaged beyond repair, but Matt located another mag with a good case to use from Biewers, and is just waiting on new bearings now.
 

Jacob WI

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/15/2019
I brought the carb to the local machine shop here in Kenmare, ND and had them make a new venturi and throttle shaft and bushings for me. I'm fighting a cold now so haven't gotten to put it back together yet, but the parts look good.



Things are going pretty smooth considering I am 10 hours away from the tractor, and I have had this for about 7 months now. But spring is coming soon and I still have a lot to do...:O

I'm still on the hunt for the elusive '27 throttle quadrant, but I have rounded up about everything else.
 

Jacob WI

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/15/2019
A quick reminder what it looked like the day I got it


What do you think, will it be running this spring?:shrug::brows:

And as usual, I have added a bunch more pics to my Photobucket account, check them out if you're interested.

Thanks!
 

Jacob WI

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/15/2019
Good Afternoon everyone!

I have a couple little updates to add.
I ordered up some brake lining material from McMaster-Carr
http://www.mcmaster.com/#brake-lining/=11f95ld
And shortly after it was delivered back home, Dad text me some pics showing me he had it installed on the original brake band. That was a nice surprise!




Meanwhile, here in the prairie, I got around to assembling the carb with its new parts. I'm 99% done with it now. I just have to order up that brass tube that was cracked. A bunch of people suggested soldering it up, but with so many cracks and it being so small, I decided to just replace it with a new piece. Again, I found it on McMaster, those people have EVERYTHING!
http://www.mcmaster.com/#brass/=11f9d0u




Things are coming right along,
I'll have to go start on another part now...
 

Jacob WI

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/15/2019
Even the small victories are worth noting.
This afternoon I tackled the radiator cap.


I ended up drilling the old screws out and cleaning up the threads, because of course the old screws snapped off, why wouldn't they?

Made a new gasket, and metal plate, a couple new screws and bingo, we have a finished radiator cap!



It's worth noting that the '27 radiator cap is different than the '28 and '29 20-35's. It has two screws, where the later ones have one rivet in the center to hold the metal plate.

What next?
 

Jacob WI

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/15/2019
Suppose I can tackle the Fan Hub.


I have the Hyatt bearing style fan hub. There are three different variations of the fan hubs over the years.

I have the bearing and washers taken out


But am wondering what the trick is to get the sleeve out that the bearing rides in? It is a split sleeve and has three holes in it, one on either side of the slit, and one opposite. Is there a special tool to get this out? It needs to be removed so the new seal can be installed, which is located behind (or at the bottom in these pics) the sleeve.



Thanks!
 

Phil Johnson

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
There was probably a special tool to contract the race and lift it out. Seeing that it is split, it shouldn't take a lot to remove it so you can get the felt retaining washer (part #E-296) out. You might try a soft brass or copper punch and come in through the end where the seal is and see if you can engage the three holes in turn and drive the race out.
I haven't done this so this is just what I would try.

Going by the fan diagram in the early Allis parts list.
 

Jacob WI

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/15/2019
There was probably a special tool to contract the race and lift it out. Seeing that it is split, it shouldn't take a lot to remove it so you can get the felt retaining washer (part #E-296) out. You might try a soft brass or copper punch and come in through the end where the seal is and see if you can engage the three holes in turn and drive the race out.
I haven't done this so this is just what I would try.

Going by the fan diagram in the early Allis parts list.
Thanks Phil, that is kinda what I was thinking, figured if anyone would know you all would:brows:
I'll have to go clean it up a bit and study it some more. I got to thinking about it today and am now wondering of the sleeve and lip (or washer) on the bottom that holds the felt seal in, are one piece or two?
I'm betting two, since the parts manual calls it a separate piece. Which brings up another question. Which way are they lapped? Does the sleeve have to come out first, or is the washer inside the sleeve? I'm betting the sleeve is holding the washer in, as that's what the diagram looks like to me.
Thoughts?
 

Phil Johnson

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
I haven't taken one of those apart, but by looking at the drawing in the parts book, it appears the sleeve seats on the washer holding it in place. Seeing that the sleeve is split, it shouldn't take much force to drive it out with a soft metal punch if you can get access through the seal end.
 

Jacob WI

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/15/2019
So I'm looking for some advice and info on oil filters.

I have the original Purolator Type B filter for this tractor, and have figured out how it mounts.

Nevermind that I had the intake manifold upside down

But what I am having a hard time researching is what to put back INTO this filter.

The original "filter" element is a piece of cloth over a large spring with a metal adapter plate on top that fits into the filter housing top.



Now, being we are in the 21st century now, there are much better filters available today.

What I want to do is find a better modern (& easily available) filter that I can put inside this original filter housing. I can have an adapter plate made if necessary.
I just don't know were to start to figure out WHAT type of filter to use??
It's not like I can cross reference this old original one, LOL!

My thinking is to find some type of cartridge oil filter like this:
http://www.steinertractor.com/ABC493-cartridge-type-oil-filter

But how do I know what type to use?
What type of flow is required?
Will too much back pressure cause issues? To little?

Just so many questions. ANY help or advice is welcome:D Thanks!
 

Phil Johnson

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
That is a bypass type oil filter. As you can see, it taps into the main oil gallery line from the oil pump so all of the oil does not go through the filter before being delivered to the engine. Eventually all the oil may get filtered!

You just need to find a filter long enough to fit in the housing or you may have to find a couple of shorter ones that stack to get close to the length you need.

As to pressure, my 20-35's show 60 psi cold and run about 40 hot.

You might want to check Tony Thompsons thread from a few years ago when he got his '27 going. I think he may have done some research on the filters for that particular unit.
 

Jacob WI

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/15/2019
That is a bypass type oil filter. As you can see, it taps into the main oil gallery line from the oil pump so all of the oil does not go through the filter before being delivered to the engine. Eventually all the oil may get filtered!

You just need to find a filter long enough to fit in the housing or you may have to find a couple of shorter ones that stack to get close to the length you need.

As to pressure, my 20-35's show 60 psi cold and run about 40 hot.

You might want to check Tony Thompsons thread from a few years ago when he got his '27 going. I think he may have done some research on the filters for that particular unit.
http://www.smokstak.com/forum/showthread.php?t=114173&page=6
You bring up a good point, I should reread what had been done more often. I have read through Tony's post several times, but had forgot about his filter info. I just reread that bit, and his is an aftermarket filter unit. But I am wondering if the canister filter he used would also work in my application? I'll have to do some digging.

As for the correct length issue, I was planning on just fabing up an "adapter plate" to put into the bottom of my canister (remember on mine the dome is at the bottom) to "fill up" the extra space to where ever the new filter comes down to.
See any reason why this would not work?

And is it safe to assume that sense this is not a full flow filter, that it doesn't really matter what kind of filter I put in it? So long as it is filtering something?
A filter with a more "free-flowing" resistance would be better correct?
Kinda thinking out loud here, open for input, where the filter experts at? :brows: thanks.
 

Phil Johnson

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
Jacob, anything is probably better than the old spring in a sock that was original equipment!!:D
 

TRS66

Registered
A young friend of mine who has a pretty impressive stable of A-Cs including two 20-35s has discovered that a LF 485 Hastings filter works in that Purolator housing. Really enjoy this thread Jacob keep up the good work. TR
 

Jacob WI

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/15/2019
A young friend of mine who has a pretty impressive stable of A-Cs including two 20-35s has discovered that a LF 485 Hastings filter works in that Purolator housing. Really enjoy this thread Jacob keep up the good work. TR
Thanks TR!
Just so we are clear, are you sure this filter is for MY style of Purolator, and not the later more common Purolator housings found on '28's and '29's? They are different.:O
Mine has no bolt going down through the center like the later ones do.
If it is for mine, how did he go about sealing up the bottom hole in the filter, and what kind of adapter plates were needed for either the bottom to hold it in place, or for the top to connect to housing?:shrug:

A quick cross reference finds a NAPA 1155
http://www.nfhconnect.com/Lookup/PartDetail?Part=84547&Brand=NAP
I would prefer something that I can pick up at any NAPA, etc.. and not have to order online (as I believe none of the common stores carry Hastings? Or am I wrong?).
Thanks!
 

Jacob WI

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/15/2019
Another small victory today!

I got the fan hub taken the rest of the way apart, all the parts cleaned up, new seal installed and everything put back together.



 

Jacob WI

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/15/2019
A little tip: A piece of 1 1/2" PVC is the perfect size to drive the sleeve back into the hub:brows:


And done!



I'm running out of parts to work on here, I'm going to have to make a trip home soon...
I did order some more goodies today... Stay tuned for more fun!
 

TRS66

Registered
Pretty sure that Hastings filter is for the 28 and up. Sorry didn't realize the 27 was that different. You might try it any way it's probably not too expensive, and it just might work.
 
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