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1930 Farmall Regular - 17 Years and Counting!

Ric Murphy

Registered
Looking at the last picture of my previous post, I need to eliminate the elbow to the left of the mounting flange and replace it with a straight pipe. So the portion of the elbow with the “X” goes. Also will take 2” out of the flange (also marked with an “X”). The attached pics may help show what I’m trying to create. The first 2 are Regulars with I believe correct breathers which I’m trying to copy (at least the part that goes to the carb). The 3rd shows a Regular with an F20 breather like the one I have. Hope this helps.
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Duey C

Subscriber
Age
55
Last Subscription Date
12/08/2019
Like that streamlined look on those air cleaners. That second pic is surreal! (Merriam-Webster)
I like the way you guys post progress!
Uhh, almost glad I did not post about those neat front wheels...
Ric, hold onto them for a bit if you would. They are different.
 

Russ Hamm

Subscriber
Age
61
Last Subscription Date
10/12/2024
I was going to say I think we just made a tube like the third picture when using an F-20 air cleaner.
Much like an F-30 tube but cut shorter on both ends if I remember right. Only bad thing about
that was later we ran out of F-30 tubes and those, as they run horizontal,can get rusted out and
hard to find good ones.
 

Ric Murphy

Registered
I found some more pictures tonight while looking for something else. I knew I had them but couldn’t find them last week. These are from early in the project. Here’s some of the manifold and muffler. I had forgotten how bad the manifold was. Can’t remember how many hours I spent on them but it was a lot! I’m sure the manifold would have worked fine (just not pretty) but was glad to have found a much better one. I did use the muffler though. I have 2 others in similar shape. One actually might be a bit better.
 

Attachments

Ric Murphy

Registered
Clutch, pressure plate and flywheel. Also a pic of one of the 2 cylinders that had a large nick near the top. Glad I never had to use any of these either. That last parts tractor that gave me a block, head and rear wheels was likely the best stroke of luck in the last 17 years.
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Ric Murphy

Registered
When I removed the oil filter housing from the old block, I was surprised to find an original, Purolater re useable oil filter inside. Only the second one I’ve ever seen. My 22-36 also had one. I choose not to use them. Not sure if it’s fear of not cleaning them thoroughly or laziness (or both!). Modern paper filters are available and cheap so that’s the route I take. Plus they make a great conversation piece. Most people have never seen or heard of such a thing.
 

Attachments

Ric Murphy

Registered
One last thought for the night. When I mounted the air breather the other night to take some measurements, I couldn’t believe how heavy it was. It was all I could do to hold it up long enough to get one bolt started. I can’t believe some engineer thought it was a good idea to mount that much weight off the side of the radiator. Especially with the bulk of the weight so far forward of the mounting point. One of the pictures in my first post shows a much smaller, lighter and incorrect breather someone in the past put on. When I took it off I found the rad side support had been broken and welded. I wonder now if the weight of the original breather caused the break when they hit a hard bump or if they hit something with the breather that cause it. Guess I’ll never know. Just hope whoever did the welding did a good job! Anyone else seen this on a Regular or F20?
96B83EFA-A382-429B-B973-C0CD0F5A3B2E.jpeg
 

Ric Murphy

Registered
I’ve been slacking a bit on the tractor work since I got it running a couple weeks ago, but do have a few updates. First the air breather modification. The welder got the casting cut last week but needed a dimension to the carb to make the insert where the elbow was. As of Tuesday past he hadn’t starting welding yet. He’s a busy guy! These pics showing the cuts were taken Monday morning when I was there.
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Ric Murphy

Registered
Tonight I got the extensions cut off the front wheels (my apologies to the guys that liked them!). The guide I made for the grinder worked well. On the first wheel I used the guide as long as I could, but took it off for the last little bit. On the second wheel I only used it long enough to make a cut about 1/8” deep and did the rest without it. The second wheel went quicker that way and did just as good a job. This short video shows how accurate the cut turned out.
I rolled one front wheel up on a block so I could spin the other. Had a helper spin the wheel while I did the grinding. First wheel took about 45 minutes. Second one about 30. Hardest part was holding the grinder straight to avoid binding. Still have some more grinding to do to finish them off.
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Ric Murphy

Registered
I also remembered last week another job I needed to do. The Farmall tractor featured independent rear wheel brakes and an automatic braking system. Today we take independent rear brakes for granted, conveniently operated with foot pedals. The Farmalls brakes were activated with hand levers. Not convenient for making tight turns while cultivating when both hands were busy turning the steering wheel. On the back of the front steering post is an arm. Attached to that arm are 2 cables. Each runs thru a pulley and down the side of the tractor back to the brakes levers. As the front wheels are turned either right or left, the arm on the steering post engages after about 30 degrees. As the cable tightens one of the brakes starts to apply. The harder the turn, the more brake applied. Slick and simple system. My tractor had all the parts but both cables had broken and been spliced using u-bolt clamps. Repro’s are available but thought I’d try a home made fix. New 3/16” cable was readily available at the hardware store. Splices are also available but they make a “side by side” connection which wouldn’t pull right. So I bought 1’ of 1/4” copper tubing and cut into 1-1/2” lengths. I had to ream out the tubes with a 3/16” drill to get the cable in. After inserting each cable end in half way, I used a sharp punch to make a series of indents to hold the cable in place. This is very similar to the way we spliced wires at the wire harness plant I worked at, only they had higher tech equipment! My plan was to solder the couplings but I was unable to get solder to stick to the old cable even after sandblasting it. I also tried brazing but by the time I got the cable hot enough to stick, the copper coupler melted. So I just decided to fill the coupler with JB Weld, then insert the cable. I covered the entire joint with heat shrink to hide it. Got everything installed and set up tonight. Seems to work well. Time will tell if my splices hold. A few pics and a short video showing how the system works.

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Duey C

Subscriber
Age
55
Last Subscription Date
12/08/2019
Good on you for doing those cables COLD with the "dented" copper. Keep us up to speed how the copper fairs.
Had some E brake cables that I decided to with HOT. Didn't work out, the cables just broke off at the joint.
They didn't like the heat.
I built a really simple, sandwich type jig with a couple holes, some alignment pins and some weld tacks in the main cable hole to crimp the end to the cable. THAT worked.
The front rims still look good!
:)
 

Russ Hamm

Subscriber
Age
61
Last Subscription Date
10/12/2024
It will be interesting to me to see how those couplers hold up, have been saving ends for years
until I could fix them up.
 

archbar

Registered
Clutch, pressure plate and flywheel. Also a pic of one of the 2 cylinders that had a large nick near the top. Glad I never had to use any of these either. That last parts tractor that gave me a block, head and rear wheels was likely the best stroke of luck in the last 17 years.
View attachment 384922View attachment 384923View attachment 384924
That's one rusty clutch plate! How hard was it to strip that clutch assembly apart? I find the hardest jobs are trying to take things apart without breaking them. What were you tapping there?
 

Russ Hamm

Subscriber
Age
61
Last Subscription Date
10/12/2024
That's one rusty clutch plate! How hard was it to strip that clutch assembly apart? I find the hardest jobs are trying to take things apart without breaking them. What were you tapping there?
Ill bet cleaning flywheel holes but also ive had rusted pressure plate bolt heads so bad I had to cut them off and remove the rest.
 

archbar

Registered
I also remembered last week another job I needed to do. The Farmall tractor featured independent rear wheel brakes and an automatic braking system. Today we take independent rear brakes for granted, conveniently operated with foot pedals. The Farmalls brakes were activated with hand levers. Not convenient for making tight turns while cultivating when both hands were busy turning the steering wheel. On the back of the front steering post is an arm. Attached to that arm are 2 cables. Each runs thru a pulley and down the side of the tractor back to the brakes levers. As the front wheels are turned either right or left, the arm on the steering post engages after about 30 degrees. As the cable tightens one of the brakes starts to apply. The harder the turn, the more brake applied. Slick and simple system. My tractor had all the parts but both cables had broken and been spliced using u-bolt clamps. Repro’s are available but thought I’d try a home made fix. New 3/16” cable was readily available at the hardware store. Splices are also available but they make a “side by side” connection which wouldn’t pull right. So I bought 1’ of 1/4” copper tubing and cut into 1-1/2” lengths. I had to ream out the tubes with a 3/16” drill to get the cable in. After inserting each cable end in half way, I used a sharp punch to make a series of indents to hold the cable in place. This is very similar to the way we spliced wires at the wire harness plant I worked at, only they had higher tech equipment! My plan was to solder the couplings but I was unable to get solder to stick to the old cable even after sandblasting it. I also tried brazing but by the time I got the cable hot enough to stick, the copper coupler melted. So I just decided to fill the coupler with JB Weld, then insert the cable. I covered the entire joint with heat shrink to hide it. Got everything installed and set up tonight. Seems to work well. Time will tell if my splices hold. A few pics and a short video showing how the system works.

View attachment 386736View attachment 386738View attachment 386737View attachment 386739View attachment 386740
Ric, I never knew this about Farmall Regular tractors, great story about the brake cables. You did amazing work with the copper crimps. Did you JD Weld the cables to the copper? Well Done Ric!
 

Ric Murphy

Registered
I didn’t have to use the clutch, flywheel and pressure plate in my last pics. Those were part of the first engine which I swapped for the one out of the last parts tractor. That one had the multi disc clutch that I rebuilt.

I put J.B. Weld on the cable ends and inside the coupler then inserted the cable and crimped before it cured. I do expect that they’ll hold just fine.
 
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