1947 Nat'l BD Quincy/Wisconsin S# 259 compressor info needed.

Lizardking

New member
Just picked up this compressor and wanted advice and info. It was on a 75 f250 service truck that was sitting since 2001. I'm surprised the Compressor runs, builds and holds air due to its age. Only ran it to test before I bought it and only to 40 psi. The guy I bought it from didn't know anything about the compressor. I will be cleaning the carb and changing oils and filters. What oil should I use for the pump and engine? Will it put out enough cfm to run my blasting cabinet? Hopefully I made a good buy since its my first real compressor. Pump is a Quincy 325 and the engine a Wisconsin AENLD. Thanks in advance. Will be posting pictures when I figure out how.
 
Greetings Lizardking, The Quincy is a tried and true platform. Few suggestions. (1)Source a Service Manual (2) Change oil with proper rated oil (3)Replace unloader diaphrams. They check and rot with time and cause leaks and efficiency issues. Cheap and Easy. (4) Clean or replace filter element whatever is required. A foam sock is also available for very dusty environments.(5)Might consider cleaning the poppet valves as they gum a bit with time. (6) Compare CFM rating of compressor with nozzle CFM to find out if your unit will suffice. Take note, as your nozzle wears CFM consumption increases, so keep it in good condition. This unit is a excellent platform and can really slug it out with very few if any issues. Enuf Said.
 

K-Tron

Active member
Lizardking, welcome to smokstak! That is a great find. There is nothing better than a Quincy QR-25 series compressor and a Wisconsin engine. As Greg mentioned, the Quincy 325 is a real workhorse of a compressor. They are one of the only compressors that can run 25,000+ hours between rebuilds. The Wisconsin AENL is equally as stout and can be rebuilt over and over again. Your setup is not from 1947. The Quincy 325-7 came out on January 15th of 1958 and had an updated connecting rod for both the high and low pressure pistons. Your Quincy 325-7 compressor was superseded by revision 8 in March of 1962. You are lucky that your compressor was not built before 1958 as it would have had ring oilers instead of a dedicated rotary vane oil pump which was Quincy's standard until Atlas Crapco bought and destroyed Quincy starting in 2004. You should be running Mobil Rarus 427 ISO 100 SAE 30 oil in your compressor. You should check the oil regularly for water buildup as your compressor has VD dual control on it. When free-wheeling the compressor will discharge the inlet air into the crankcase of the compressor. You can download a Quincy service manual and parts list online for free on their website. Quincy has always used Solberg air filters and they can be had on ebay cheaper than your Quincy dealer. Unloader diaphragms are really easy to replace. The diaphragms are on the top of the unloader towers under the six flat head screws on the intake side of your compressor. You can certainly rebuild the valves, and I would recommend you doing so. Quincy changed the spring loaded pins, valve discs and bumper springs many times over the years. Your compressor will have spiral taper springs which are more noisy and yield less performance than the current replacement. Do not buy aftermarket parts, buy genuine Quincy, you will be glad that you did. Keep in mind that the model 325 is a 3-5 horsepower compressor. It is at most 16cfm. You will be okay running a #4 (1/4") nozzle in your blast cabinet, but nothing larger. Do NOT overspeed your compressor to try and make it pump faster. Most blasting takes place at 90psi. Your compressor has a maximum operating speed of 900rpm. Before you run the engine and compressor anymore, you should pull the engine off of the platform it is mounted on, and pull the oil pan. These engines have an oil pump in them that needs to be cleaned from time to time. The check balls in the oil pump are known to stick preventing the oil pump from working properly. Most of the time the oil is never drained hot or changed periodically, so you will likely find 1/4" of sludge in the oil pan. Clean everything out nice, test the oil pump, and refill the crankcase with Rotella T-1 SAE 30 or similar high grade detergent oil. Do not use synthetic oil in these engine. I would not run a multiweight oil in your engine either. Parts are readily available for your engine. The AEN has been in production for over 60 years. It was one of the most rugged 9 horsepower air cooled engines that money could buy. I am not certain that the Prestolite ignition timer/distributor was actually available when your unit was built. It likely had a Fairbanks Morse magneto on it at one point in time. I cannot tell from your pictures if your unit has an auto idle setup or not. Some of the Wisconsin compressors I have seen had either a big centrifugal clutch on them, or were direct drive with a small air cylinder mounted on the carburetor controlled by the compressors unloader, to auto-idle the engine. When setup correctly they worked really nice.

Chris
 

mschreiber

Active member
ain't the engine serial number stamped on the tag? did u date the engine? what chris says about sludge in the oil pan is very important. heres photo of 1 of my sludge clean outs on a wisconsin engine. good luck with ur project.
 

Lizardking

New member
Greetings Lizardking, The Quincy is a tried and true platform. Few suggestions. (1)Source a Service Manual (2) Change oil with proper rated oil (3)Replace unloader diaphrams. They check and rot with time and cause leaks and efficiency issues. Cheap and Easy. (4) Clean or replace filter element whatever is required. A foam sock is also available for very dusty environments.(5)Might consider cleaning the poppet valves as they gum a bit with time. (6) Compare CFM rating of compressor with nozzle CFM to find out if your unit will suffice. Take note, as your nozzle wears CFM consumption increases, so keep it in good condition. This unit is a excellent platform and can really slug it out with very few if any issues. Enuf Said.
Hello Greg, Im a newbie when it comes to compressor talk. I'm going to have to look up some of those parts you mentioned :shrug: Great tip on the nozzle wear.

---------- Post added at 11:05:31 AM ---------- Previous post was at 10:42:11 AM ----------

Lizardking, welcome to smokstak! That is a great find. There is nothing better than a Quincy QR-25 series compressor and a Wisconsin engine.Chris
Hello Cris. My brain is still trying to absorb all the great information . If its not a set up from 1947 was it pieced together? Is the nat'l tank from 1947 ? Im going to take the engine off before I cherry pick the beast off the truck. I appreciate the time you took to share your knowledge. Ollie

---------- Post added at 11:22:14 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:05:31 AM ----------

Hello mschreiber. Haven't had a chance to clean up the tag. It has spray paint on it but will be looking up the year it was made. I'm hoping it's not bad when I take the pan off. What project?:shrug: I just have to change the oil.. :O:O
 

mschreiber

Active member
IMHO, Winnies were the best aircooled engines back then. 1 of very few with real ballbearings used on each end of the crankshaft. but the oiling system has to work.:salute:
 

Lizardking

New member
From what I've read the wisconsin is work horse as long as it has all the right cooling tins and routine maintenance. This isn't my first aircooled engine. I have a 1956 VW beatle that only needed a tune up and cleaning when I got it. :O:O.
 

crugg65

New member
You might be right that your compressor is pieced together or the tank was replaced with a bigger or better tank. Your tank was made by Atlas Steel Tank in 1947 and I think that Nat’l BD is the agency that certified the tank being that pressure vessels have strict standards. When steam ruled the planet and horrible explosions came about from pressure vessels being inferior then the government stepped in to prevent that. The main thing is that you have a perfect union with a Wisconsin/Quincy air compressor setup. I’m curious to know what year your Wisconsin is and if you can read the tag . I have a Wisconsin AEN and I think I have a AENLD. I got to check inventory ( my stash and my kids inheritance).
 

K-Tron

Active member
I would be curious to see what the serial number of your Wisconsin AENLD engine is. I would guess that your engine was actually built in the mid to late 1960s. I have never seen a 50s era Wisconsin AEN or AENL with electric start. The blocks were not made to accept an electric starter, the casting ears to support the starter were simply not there. My records show that the model AEN came out in 1949 and was upgraded to the model AENL in 1957. The difference between the model AEN and AENL lies in the camshaft, valves, governor flyweights and carburetor. The AENL is basically a high speed version of the AEN for more horsepower. 9.2 instead of 8.2hp. My Quincy literature shows the model 325 as being originally introduced in September of 1950. Your compressor might have been pieced together at some point, unless the engine and serial number dates match up. It is possible that someone mounted the engine and compressor on a smaller tank to fit on the service truck. Please post a picture of the serial number and type number on the tag of your Wisconsin engine.

Chris
 

Lizardking

New member
Ok yeah I misread the tank tag . I wonder what originally came with this Atlas tank . Would any of the info on the tank tag give a clue ? Had to borrow a cherry picker to haul it out the truck bed and haven't had a chance to clean up the Wisconsin tag. Im going to put some steel casters to roll it to its new home.
 

Lizardking

New member
My records show that the model AEN came out in 1949 and was upgraded to the model AENL in 1957. The difference between the model AEN and AENL lies in the camshaft, valves, governor flyweights and carburetor. The AENL is basically a high speed version of the AEN for more horsepower. 9.2 instead of 8.2hp. Chris
When did the AENLD start production? Here'sa couple more pictures before I hauled it out.
 

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Lizardking

New member
Here's a picture of the Wisconsin tag. A little hard to read but if you zoom in you can make out the numbers Looked it up and it was made January 1965. It definitely was pieced together at some point.
 

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Lizardking

New member
Update on my progress with the beast. I've had limited time to work on the Quincy/Wisconsin but have put in some work. The crud buildup was about 1/2 inch thick in some places and cleaning the cooling fins was a challenge but was able to get it done. The oil pump on the Wisconsin was in good working order but took it apart and cleaned it up. I checked for functionality and primed it before bolting it up. Took the carb apart for cleaning but wasn't bad at all but still gave it a good cleaning . Made some gaskets for it, adjusted the floater and put it back together. While cleaning the tank I found a tag from a dairy that started business in the late 1850's and still in business today. It's interesting to me because I work in a dairy company and we make milk for that company. :eek: It was meant to be.....:cool:
 

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IronworkerFXR

Subscriber
Quincy compressors have been great for me,
Quiet and dependable. I agree with all that good advice on their maintaining.

Nice score.
 
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