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1952 L120 International Truck

pwise

Registered
Recently bought a pretty good 1952 international l120, about 60,000 miles, no rust. Trying to figure out placement of spare on bed side. Is a bracket needed? All 4 wheels and spare are original, 6 bolt pattern. Does that spare just mount on bed side, no bracket, or does it require that bracket I've seen in some of these great restoration photos. Also, saw a seller on eBay trying to get rid of a small bracket that mounts to dash near glove box that holds cable, other knobs for heater? Never seen that before. New to forum today!-Pete
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Welcome!
I'm one of the IHC guys, here.
Pictures are so helpful...
The six-lug wheels are known as "big six" and are very impressive-looking.
However, brake parts availabilty is awful with replacement drums being non-existent. Aftermarket wheel availabilty is slim to none.
It's been my experience that similar-era IHC 1/2 ton hubs (5 lug) and drums slide right on the big six front spindles, if you wish to change to a common bolt pattern. Putting an updated rear axle with better road gears gets you 5 lug on the back.
The IHC L, R, S Series are all very similar mechanically and sheetmetal-wise.
That's about 1949-1956.
All the IHC spare tires I've seen are held on by a bracket that is bolted, riveted or welded to the outside of the bed.
Having said all that I like the look of "big six". I can tell you that very few trucks with that bolt pattern were sold where I live, so they are rare in Central CA. I hardly ever see "big six".
Best of luck.
 

pwise

Registered
Great information, many thanks. These are great trucks, but a bit of a challenge for parts. When it first arrived in my neighborhood, I made many friends of older guys like myself with fond tales of an old international on the farm or parked in driveway. There's something meaningful in being able to hear those stories.
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Again, please post pictures.
My opinion: if it's a nice, original truck get it running and safe to drive and then enjoy on slow moving streets, only. Conserve it as a piece of history.
If it's not so nice or original, update as needed to make it driveable in today's world.
I do frame swaps. I'm not bashful, at all.
I have old trucks 100% stock and then some with newer frames underneath. I never chop up anything complete or nice. That's a tragedy.
Best of luck!
 
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