• If you like antique engines, vintage tractors or old iron machinery, register and join us. When you register on Smokstak, please give complete answers and fill in all blanks. IF YOU ARE ON WIRELESS OR SATELLITE, GIVE YOUR CITY AND STATE! NO ZIPCODES! All registrations are manually approved.

1974 Maytag TOL washer & dryer pair for free like new

Motormowers

Subscriber
Age
55
Last Subscription Date
07/13/2019
Got a call from a friend that said he had sold his moms condo estate and remembered me always talking about how reliable my old Maytags were. He said he had his moms old Harvest Gold pair she bought new in 1974 and they were still in great shape and if I wanted them free come today as tomorrow they were scrap metal. I hurried over and found they were a pristine pair of top of the line 806 large capacity models with back lit panels. I was able to test them before disconnecting them and they were as silent as new. In fact the tubs both still looked new inside. We loaded them up and I was on my way. I will never understand how people can trash perfectly good working old appliances that are known to be 100% better than the new crap they sell today that isnt even worth a service call to diagnose. The dryer I'll oil all pulleys and bearings and the washer will get new belts and water hoses and the motor slides lubed so they'll both be ready way down the road when my current one kicks the bucket. These should last another 10 years at least, maybe longer. Maytag wasn't wasnt joking about the lonely repairman years ago. It didnt get better than a Maytag washer or dryer.
 

Attachments

grub54891

Registered
Age
63
Last Subscription Date
06/08/2010
We had the same ones when we first got married, they lasted about ten years after we got them, used. The only things I had to replace was the water valve on the back, and a belt once. Gave them away still working to another couple who just got married also.
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Ooh, those are nice. Are you a member over on AutomaticWasher.org ? Those guys would really appreciate them too.

Keith
 

Motormowers

Subscriber
Age
55
Last Subscription Date
07/13/2019
I am. Sadly that website has been taken over by a bunch of catty little queens that are more concerned with Trump bashing than anything else. Its gotten sickening as of late their hate and vitriol has gotten so bad.
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Oh no. I haven’t been over there in a long time. Damn. That’s really too bad.
 

JoeCB

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/19/2020
The old machines were not engineered with planned obsolesces in mind. The wife and I have got you by 10 years. We still use daily our matching set of Lady Kenmore washer and dryer, installed new in January 1965. I bought them with the house in 1978. Still doing their thing after daily use for the family. There has been maintenance and repairs over the years. Now I see the end or the road approaching. I do not want these to go to the scrap. I have offered them FREE to the collection of the Henry Ford's domestic appliance collection. Even have the original literature. They are "considering" the offer. Hell, I would even deliver them , as they are only 30 minutes away.
Joe B
 

Attachments

Motormowers

Subscriber
Age
55
Last Subscription Date
07/13/2019
Im pretty sure someone on automaticwasher.org would love to have them and maybe travel for them and give them a good home. When I moved in 2006 I sold my grandmothers 1949 Blackstone washer in fair condition for $500.00 and it cost the guy $500.00 to ship it by truck from CT to NE. I would post these on there.
 

I like oldstuff

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/09/2015
Moto:
I had similar units. It's been many years but when you're into the washer, see if it has the FQ motor.
It was problematic for me so if you come across one you might snap up a spare. Hopefully yours doesn't have it.
 

Motormowers

Subscriber
Age
55
Last Subscription Date
07/13/2019
The old machines were not engineered with planned obsolesces in mind. The wife and I have got you by 10 years. We still use daily our matching set of Lady Kenmore washer and dryer, installed new in January 1965. I bought them with the house in 1978. Still doing their thing after daily use for the family. There has been maintenance and repairs over the years. Now I see the end or the road approaching. I do not want these to go to the scrap. I have offered them FREE to the collection of the Henry Ford's domestic appliance collection. Even have the original literature. They are "considering" the offer. Hell, I would even deliver them , as they are only 30 minutes away.
Joe B
Joe check your inbox please. Thanks.
 

Joe K

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
I have the maytag washer & dryer I bought new in 1978. Still in daily use - and I mean DAILY.

I replace a belt in the dryer about every 10 years. I replaced the felt seals in the dryer at about year 30 mark. I replaced the motor in the dryer about year 35 after the starter winding burned out (you could "pull" the dryer into motion by holding the door switch and then "tugging" on the dryer drum.) The motor has an additional speed switch which switches the heating coil "on" once it is running.

I replaced a door switch once, and a door knob a couple of times.

The dryer timer won't do "start" now when you press the knob, instead the contacts are frozen and the machine starts when you turn it off zero. I have unfrozen the contacts a couple of times - now I don't bother.

The washer has had a new belt about every 10 years or so.

At about year 25 on the washer perhaps 2003, the solenoid water-in valve got hung up and the washer overflowed. I removed the water valve and am standing in line waiting at the Maytag service center for the counter-man to get to me. He finishes with the person in front and then abruptly leaves letting me stand there. A minute or two later he returns from upstairs with a box in his hand.

He says "I think you need one of these." Inside the box is the same valve but new.

"How old is your machine?" he asks.

"Been in service since 1978"

"You got well water?"

"Yes I said." (We're seacoast NH with underlying rock strata.)

"Thats about right" he says. "Here in New Hampshire the well water from the rocks can have 'fines' brought with it. In time, like 25 years, the fines work their way into the valve and hang it up. Did the machine overflow?"

"Yes, I said."

"Well, this will solve it." he says. "You'll be good for the next 25 years."

Those old Maytags are not the largest machines on the marketplace, especially today. But they HAVE to have been the most well made.

Joe K
 

Kevin O. Pulver

Email NOT Working
Age
54
Last Subscription Date
02/14/2020
I agree and thank you for sharing. Those are great!
Have you seen the 1950s "easy" brand spin drier washing machines? They look about like the old Maytag round washers but instead of a wringer, they have a separate tub to spin the water out of them.

They're built like a tank, but there's nothing automatic about them. You have to manually fill it, drain it, fill it again to rinse, turn the agitator on and off, move the clothes into the spin tub, and start and stop it when you want.
My wife used it for a few months when hers broke down once and she realized what it means when they call something an automatic washer.

A man named Lee Maxwell wrote a book about washing machines called, "saving women's lives". He has a museum in Colorado with somewhere around 800 machines on display.
 

Motormowers

Subscriber
Age
55
Last Subscription Date
07/13/2019
I have the maytag washer & dryer I bought new in 1978. Still in daily use - and I mean DAILY.

I replace a belt in the dryer about every 10 years. I replaced the felt seals in the dryer at about year 30 mark. I replaced the motor in the dryer about year 35 after the starter winding burned out (you could "pull" the dryer into motion by holding the door switch and then "tugging" on the dryer drum.) The motor has an additional speed switch which switches the heating coil "on" once it is running.

I replaced a door switch once, and a door knob a couple of times.

The dryer timer won't do "start" now when you press the knob, instead the contacts are frozen and the machine starts when you turn it off zero. I have unfrozen the contacts a couple of times - now I don't bother.

The washer has had a new belt about every 10 years or so.

At about year 25 on the washer perhaps 2003, the solenoid water-in valve got hung up and the washer overflowed. I removed the water valve and am standing in line waiting at the Maytag service center for the counter-man to get to me. He finishes with the person in front and then abruptly leaves letting me stand there. A minute or two later he returns from upstairs with a box in his hand.

He says "I think you need one of these." Inside the box is the same valve but new.

"How old is your machine?" he asks.

"Been in service since 1978"

"You got well water?"

"Yes I said." (We're seacoast NH with underlying rock strata.)

"Thats about right" he says. "Here in New Hampshire the well water from the rocks can have 'fines' brought with it. In time, like 25 years, the fines work their way into the valve and hang it up. Did the machine overflow?"

"Yes, I said."

"Well, this will solve it." he says. "You'll be good for the next 25 years."

Those old Maytags are not the largest machines on the marketplace, especially today. But they HAVE to have been the most well made.

Joe K
I agree 100% with what you said. These are the best. My 1974 A407 I got several years ago and have beat to death 3-4 times a week will get a refresh soon. Just did a clean out with lots of old appliance parts for Maytags. Im going to replace the tub bearing and seal, both bearings near the brake package and also the damper pads. I may even change the trans oil. After this it shouldnt need anything for another 46 years!
 

dkamp

eMail NOT Working
Shortly after getting married, my wife and I moved into our first house. My folks gifted a very old Maytag set to us, which we used there until we sold the house 12 years later. We used a 'newer' set of hand-me-downs when we moved into this place, and after several years, she she chose and acquired new while I was away... and gave the old ones to friends. Meanwhile, the buyers of our old house knocked it down, and rebuilt, but just kept using the old Maytags. We've since been through several dryers and washers, mostly killed by lightning strikes, electrical failures (power transformer on the pole) and lots of use... she finally got tired of the washing machine killing expensive microprocessor-based circuit boards.

It took me several days of discussion before I could get her to just WALK INTO a Speed Queen dealer... but it only took her a few moments to see the old-time electromechanical control clock, and serious gearbox and motor, to decide that it wasn't some kind of sick joke... Yep, it's old-school tough, and it's about 12 times faster than the 'energy saver' types she'd had before...

So SOME still make them 'like they used to'... they're a bit pricey, but worth EVERY PENNY!
 
Top