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2.5R21 Electric start issues

wh1630

Registered
Wow............that thing is gorgeous! Congratulations on a well done restoration of a "usable" piece of machinery. By the way, it's a manual start also.....that's what that dandy rope pulley wheel is for. I had a Lincoln "Weldnpower" with the same set up, but manual start only, and it was easy to start.....usually. Unfortunately, it went the way of all things, gone through a divorce. :(

As for the propane, I don't see why it couldn't be equipped with the necessary regulators, etc. Any Kohler distributor should have the information.
Thanks! I yet have to try the manual start option...

It seems as though most of the Kohler engine dealers near me don't work on or generally stock parts for this engine. Would I have to replace the existing carburetor with a special one intended for gaseous fuels? I've seen on some larger kohler and onan generators that there is a solenoid valve connected before the regulator. Would I need one of these if I want to maintain the ability to remotely start and stop the generator? I'm sure that's a no-brainer, but I've seen propane regulators that have an electric priming valve on them.
 

jack0

Registered
Age
60
You would not have to remove the carburetor. You will have to make some modifications. There are small engine kits available, or you could do it yourself. You will need a demand regulator, some way to tie the fuel line into the throat or close proximity on the carb and some kind of load block or valve for fine tuning at max load.
If your going to remote start and not be there a solenoid valve is always a good idea.
As far as priming. I would think it would be fairly fast with the regulator close to the carb.
US carburetion has kits. Might want to give them a call.
Here's a pic. of the oem setup.WIN_20171112_15_24_47_Pro (2).jpg
 

wh1630

Registered
You would not have to remove the carburetor. You will have to make some modifications. There are small engine kits available, or you could do it yourself. You will need a demand regulator, some way to tie the fuel line into the throat or close proximity on the carb and some kind of load block or valve for fine tuning at max load.
If your going to remote start and not be there a solenoid valve is always a good idea.
As far as priming. I would think it would be fairly fast with the regulator close to the carb.
US carburetion has kits. Might want to give them a call.
Here's a pic. of the oem setup.View attachment 378000
Interesting! Does the line coming out of the regulator go directly into the air intake, and if so, what is that piece between the air cleaner and the intake elbow? Does your electric plant use a Carter model N carb too? I've heard about how some people "drill out" the carburetor to adapt it for gaseous fuels.
 

dkamp

eMail NOT Working
The line from the demand regulator (aka "Zero Governor or Negative Pressure Regulator) goes through a 'load block' (which basically is just a big needle valve that only adjusts fuel flow rate when the throttle is at full-open. From there, it goes to a 'spud'... which is a tube that comes into the VENTURI, like a main jet. Negative pressure at that jet point draws fuel from the zero governor in proportion related to atmospheric pressure... by that virtue, it maintains it's own mixture.

as an alternative to installing a 'spud', a secondary venturi could be installed, on the air inlet going INTO the carb.
 
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