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3HP IHC Vertical – ADAMS Tractor

Paul Spence

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
I need HISTORY and any information you may have on this unusual and rare mechanical marvel :eek: . Please contribute anything you may know about its founder - development – design – plans - build – use – etc.. :uhoh: Private messages are welcome as are responses directly to this thread :brows: . A lot more to follow as information is found, and I bring this neglected relic back to life . What a find… :yikes: while having "FUN" ;) , even in NJ :shrug: on the way through :D
 

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Len Spoelman

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Last Subscription Date
09/25/2019
Adams Husker made carts and tractor running gear. They had a close connection to OLDS. Some carts the same as used by OLDS. Olds sold Adams Huskers. The traction running gear is shown in their flyer using OLDS, and other engines. These are the illustrations I have available at this time. I think there is an illustration using a Heer engine, none using IHC.
 

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Doug Tallman

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Last Subscription Date
10/11/2019
I have an advertisement book on Adams too. They would sell the traction gear and the buyer could use an engine they already had.
 

Paul Spence

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Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
Here is my ADAMS tractor with the 3HP IHC vertical at its new home :D . Started the R & R on a few small parts (ignitor, oiler, and mixer along with the fuel pump and piping) that were easy to remove. Cleaning them up, making gaskets, new plunger for the fuel pump :( , and more to get the compression up :p . Still looking :uhoh: for any additional information on the ADAMS HUSKER COMPANY, Marysville, Ohio (NOT J. D. HUSKER in Indiana) on their Number One Gear also known as THE ADAMS TRACTION GEAR with dates so I can put together some history of the TRACTION GEARS they made. Any help is welcome while I have “FUN” :O , even in NJ :rolleyes: on the way through.
 

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Paul Spence

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01/02/2020
I've been corrected :eek: , the company is in Marysville, Ohio and not Indiana, and I still need more information ;) . THANKS
 

Len Spoelman

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Last Subscription Date
09/25/2019
Adams Husker made carts and tractor running gear.
Attached: More pages from "The Adams Husker Co.", Marysville, OH Illustrating their "Traction Gears to Receive Stationary Engines"

Doug: Is this the same book as you have?
 

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Len Spoelman

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Last Subscription Date
09/25/2019
Adams Husker made carts and tractor running gear.
Attached: More pages from "The Adams Husker Co.", Marysville, OH Illustrating their "Traction Gears to Receive Stationary Engines"
Pictures using Fairbanks, Heer, and Sandy-McManus engines and pulling Oliver plow.
 

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Paul Spence

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Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
Here is the ADAMS Tractor in the fix it bay at my Son’s place ;) , as I work on it. I got the ignitor and Oiler cleaned up and made the ignitor gasket :brows: , I had to clean the coil connections to get that needed “FAT” :uhoh: blue spark. Going to make a new fuel pump push rod as soon as the material arrives :brows: . There is still a bit of work to do (water issues :mad: ) on the engine & the "Little Traction Gear" tractor because it sat outside for awhile, uncovered :O . Sure is a "FUN" project ;) .
 

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Doug Tallman

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Last Subscription Date
10/11/2019
Attached: More pages from "The Adams Husker Co.", Marysville, OH Illustrating their "Traction Gears to Receive Stationary Engines"

Doug: Is this the same book as you have?
It's been a while since I had mine out but the logo looks similar. Are your covers red? I think mine are.


There was also a similar unit made in Loudonville OH. I think it was called the Victor. I always wondered if they were related somehow.
 

Firewoodguy

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Last Subscription Date
02/01/2019
Paul, Very nice find! I've never seen or heard of these machines. You do find some goodies! Even being from NJ! LOL :)
 

Jebaroni

Registered
Age
39
It appears that all of the chassis in the literature were made of channel iron, but Paul's is wooden with metal bracing. What are the chances that the wood is original, versus the channel was damaged and replaced with wooden beams? It seems suspect that a wooden frame would hold up very well or for very long.
 

Kevin O. Pulver

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54
Last Subscription Date
02/14/2020
It appears that all of the chassis in the literature were made of channel iron, but Paul's is wooden with metal bracing. What are the chances that the wood is original, versus the channel was damaged and replaced with wooden beams? It seems suspect that a wooden frame would hold up very well or for very long.
I agree with you Jebaroni.
But then we also see wooden channels on many engines and also wooden buckets, wooden threshing machines, wooden corn shellers, and even wooden washing machines etc.
It seems unlikely to me that if it had metal channels originally, that both would be damaged in such a manner that they would both have to be replaced rather than patched-up and kept in service.
I would bet that the things are original. When I first saw Paul post this, I just figured it was some homemade thing that somebody made. And I guess in a way of thinking it is- a presumably small production product made to be used with whatever engine the farmer already had if he didn't want to buy it with an engine already attached. I've seen various things on engines that I was sure were homemade until I saw it on every other engine of that make
 

Paul Spence

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Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
I got the intake valve to seal, but the exhaust valve hasn’t got there yet. I’ll keep working (rotating) the valve to seat, I really don’t want to remove the head. Oiler is on as is the ignitor. The mixer has been cleaned up (a bit rusty inside) as well as the fuel lines connected to it. I’ll have to remove the fuel tank and the rest of the fuel lines to clean them a job I don’t really want to do but with a chain hoist over the beam it will be easy to lift the engine, to get it out of the base to work on. While fussing with it today I cleaned out the sump, a messy job at best :eek: and found a rod bearing shim in it and noticed that the oil slinger was missing. The shop general lighting is OK, but not for working closely on engines. So, after dropping the drop light and breaking the bulb :uhoh: I decided to get that 4’ HF LED shop light that is on sale. I got out the 6’ ladder stair and installed it above the “tractor/engine bay”. I had an extension cord to use but found it was a 2 wire one, and I needed a 3 wire one, and then….. :mad: , I decided enough “FUN” :confused: for the day, in the bay, even in NJ on the way through :shrug: .
 

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Paul Spence

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Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
The 9/16” rod came in the Brown Truck :O so I got busy and made the fuel pump plunger :) and fitted it to the pump with rope packing :uhoh: . Here are a couple of pictures making it. Now that was "FUN" and I did it right the 1st time, even in NJ on the way through :p .
 

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Mike T

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Last Subscription Date
10/03/2019
I saw one like this at the Alan Beal auction Clarksburg Indiana 7-28-2001. Was listed as 1908 Adams prototype. Unable to upload the picture I have, but looks the same.
 

Paul Spence

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Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
I took the mixer and fuel pump with the cleaned piping up to the barn today with expectations but got sidetracked just fussing with the ADAMS. I looked closely at the clutching and simple forward (L/R) wheel control and proceeded to take the control rod pivot apart. Once apart, and with copious amounts of PB Blaster, the BFH and the 36” pipe wrench, I got the sliding L/R shift selector loose and sliding, and engaging their respective L/R clutches which came loose with a little effort… :p
I removed the sump oil level indicator to clean it. As I took it apart the sight glass came out in pieces :mad: . No wonder the area was an oily mess. So out to the sight glass stash and cut me a new 2 1/4” piece of sigh glass and gaskets :shrug: . All in a days "FUN" :) , even in NJ :confused: on the way through :cool: .
 

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Len Spoelman

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Last Subscription Date
09/25/2019
It's been a while since I had mine out but the logo looks similar. Are your covers red? I think mine are.

There was also a similar unit made in Loudonville OH. I think it was called the Victor. I always wondered if they were related somehow.
I think I have the original, but what I was working off right now was a copy. Do not know the color of the covers.

There is a Victor tractor shown at the Buckley , MI show. Picture attached from the 2017 show.
 

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