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4hp Lockwood Ash

JWithers

Subscriber
Age
40
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
1" Schebler model D.
I found a Schebler DX10 A. Is this what I'm looking for?
They say the diameter of the threaded opening is 1in and the hex part of the flange is 1¼in. They say everything moves freely. It is missing cap on top where the fuel line fits. They are asking $150. Is that a fair price?
 

JWithers

Subscriber
Age
40
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
I received patterns for the upper and lower timer brackets in the mail today. Hopefully it doesn't take too long to get them to the foundry.
Also at some point today I'm going to spend some time trying to get the stuck piston out. Will be interesting figuring out how to get it out of a headless 2 cycle cylinder. Will post more on it later.
 

J.B. Castagnos

Registered
Last Subscription Date
01/01/2006
Jeremy, if the piston is anywhere but tdc, find a piece of pipe to fit the 4" bore, press the piston inward 1/2" or so. It will be much easier to remove then. Do not press the pisotn above tdc, the rings can expand and lock in the chamber, breaking the piston out is the only option then.
 

JWithers

Subscriber
Age
40
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
That is exactly what we are going to try. The piston is at the bottom of the cylinder. There is about an ⅛inch lip of cylinder before the skirt of the piston starts. If you look inside the exhaust port you can see the top maybe ½inch of the piston and inside of the cylinder.
Today all I did was put the cylinder/piston, and some loose parts in the parts washer to clean everything up. I then put plugs in all the holes and filled the cylinder with the parts washing fluid through the open intake port. Even though there is a very low chance of that helping any.
 

JSWithers

Registered
Age
63
Today all I did was put the cylinder/piston, and some loose parts in the parts washer to clean everything up. I then put plugs in all the holes and filled the cylinder with the parts washing fluid through the open intake port. Even though there is a very low chance of that helping any.
Parts washer solvent is not a very good penetrating oil. It wasn't designed for that purpose. I don't know how I'd know that.:shrug:
 

JWithers

Subscriber
Age
40
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
I don't know either. But penetrating oil isnt very good penetrating oil. Very low chance of it actually seeping around that piston. I just wanted it to get wet.
 

J.B. Castagnos

Registered
Last Subscription Date
01/01/2006
I usually put them in the press with the pipe on the bottom side of the piston, start pressing. If it's not moving and you have a fair amount of pressure on it, start heating the cylinder, it will usually pop loose before it's too hot to hold your hand on it.
 

JWithers

Subscriber
Age
40
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Patterns should be going to the foundry on friday. Was going to drop them off this past weekend but storm damage and other pressing issues prevented it from happening. Also prevented me from making any real attempt at getting the piston loose.
 

JWithers

Subscriber
Age
40
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Today was very exciting. My uncle found the right size pieces to fit the bore. Then, with a very steady hand, began to tap on the fittings. The piston immediately began to move inward. After moving in about ⅜ of an inch I noticed that the bore was wet. The parts cleaner had soaked all the way around the piston. After that we got a piece of ready rod and tapped the piston out from the top. The piston looks good. The bore looks good. The rings were all stuck but a little tapping with the plastig handle of a screwdriver took care of that.
Here are some pictures.
 

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JWithers

Subscriber
Age
40
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Finally got the patterns to the foundry yesterday. Should have my brackets in a couple weeks.
 

JWithers

Subscriber
Age
40
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Got a call from from the foundry today. My brackets are ready. I'll be picking them up next week friday. Ill be sure to post before and after picks from rough castings to finished brackets.
 

Bob Ronning

In Memory Of
Age
68
Last Subscription Date
02/08/2015
I have a 5hp Lockwood ash #625 that i am looking for timer parts also. I have the gear and part of the timer, see photo, does your engine have the steel strap to hold the timer and gear like mine? or is it bolted to the engine separately?
 

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JWithers

Subscriber
Age
40
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
No. Mine will have cast iron brackets. No strap like that. That actually looks like something someone built to get it running.

---------- Post added at 08:23 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:21 PM ----------

They are bolted to the engine directly.
 

JWithers

Subscriber
Age
40
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
I love getting parts in the mail! I recently won this on ebay. Its a 1"schebler with an extra bushing for whatever it was on. I have not yet opened it, hopefully the inside is in good shape.
 

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Warren Eastham

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/11/2019
You may be able to get the missing fuel line fitting from OTTO Gas Engine Works (sponsor). Enjoy your Schebler....they are interesting.
Good luck,
Warren
 

J.B. Castagnos

Registered
Last Subscription Date
01/01/2006
Jeremy, that looks like a 3/4", I may be wrong, hard to be sure in the picture. If it is the 4 hp will run fine with it, actually better at low speeds, won't develop full power.
 

JWithers

Subscriber
Age
40
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
JB, you are right. I just measured it with my caliper and a bore gauge. It measured 0.8095 in the inside of the pipe sticking out of it. Glad to know it will still work.

I just took it apart to check it out and it all looks to be in good shape. Could probably use a new float.
I notice things on this one that I have not seen on others.
First there isn't a choke on it. No big deal my hand works. But then there is a drain cock threaded into the top. Any ideas as to why?
Then there is a spring loaded button on it that when depressed would make contact with the float when the bowl is full. What would that be for?
 

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J.B. Castagnos

Registered
Last Subscription Date
01/01/2006
Inside the air horn you should see a leather washer that slides on a shaft, held on seat by a spring. This is a balance valve, it has a slot that lets air by-pass at idle, as you speed up it starts to flutter allowing more air in. Many of the carbs in our area have had them removed because the engine would run a little faster without them, but you had to richen the needle valve as you came to idle speed. I'm guessing someone added the petcock to give an extra adjustment, as you opened it it would lean out at higher speeds, wouldn't affect idle mixture. If you remove the throttle plate you will see a little slot machined in the carb body, this allows excess gas to drip out.The "tickler" holds the float down allowing it to flood for starting. Don't put a gasket between the carb and throttle, it will block this slot and make the engine flood easy. Dave Reed, Otto Piston Rings, has floats available for these carbs.
 

JWithers

Subscriber
Age
40
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Today was a good day for working on engines! Rain day off from work and perfect temp for a fat guy like me! So today did alot with the Lockwood -Ash. I started off by cleaning all the threads with taps. Then scraped all the mating surfaces so they were clean. I scraped all the carbon I could reach in the combustion chamber and then honed the cylinder. I also tried cleaning out the ports and any openings. In the opening where tbe water pump attaches I found a good chunk of wire probably used to hold the core in place. Then I moved on to the piston, removing the rings and cleaning the grooves. Also had to do a little scraping to remove a little corrosion from the circumference of the piston itself and scrape carbon off the top. Took the intake valve apart to clean it up and grind it a little. Then it was time to polish the rod journal which cleaned up pretty easy. Then I cut gaskets for between the crankcase and jug, water pump, and intake. Installed connecting rod and piston, slid the jug on, bolted it down and turned it over. Very smooth. Put a plug in it and tried to turn it over and wow, the compression is excellent! Not bad for an engine that sat in pieces with a stuck piston on a dirt floor for 20+ years! Now its just patience waiting for the last part to show up and getting the rest of the parts machined.
 

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