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'56 International 4WD Brush Truck Series S-140

Beth V

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
03/03/2018
Thanks for the great information. Any idea how many are left since the brakes (or lack thereof) seemed to have sped up their demise?

I'll get with my brother. It remains parked in the barn since we haven't had time to mess with it. Perhaps this winter if we don't dig into the road locomotive....:O

Beth:wave:

Beth,
I know I'm resurrecting an old thread here, but love these old 140 & 160 IH 4x4's. These are factory built IH 4x4's with Eaton designed axles and Timken T32 transfer case. I can help with lots of info on these trucks. Master cylinder and rear cylinders are pretty common. Front cylinders are almost non-existant, but can certainly be rebuilt and sleeved if necessary. Sleeving isn't cheap. If you need more info, feel free to contact me, or visit binderplanet.com and search for S140, R140, A140 or B140. Btw, I was told that the axles were offset so that a driver approaching an obstacle (think stump or rock) could line it up under his seat and drive right over (assuming it's not too big, of course). The driver train of these trucks share lots of similarities with the IH M3 and M5 trucks from WWII. Some of the military truck restorers have found some replacement front wheel cylinders that work on these. The original cylinders are step bore 1-3/8" x 1-1/8". A good old fashioned brake shop could probably find others. I was talking to someone at Capital Brake (or something similar) out near Sacramento several years ago. He had found a cylinder that had similar mounting, length, etc. and was either 1-1/4" or 1-1/8" on both sides and was confident it would work. Unfortunately, I've lost my notes where I had written the info. If your cylinders aren't pitted, rebuild parts are available.

Check out my site for more info.
http://home.comcast.net/~thefowlers4/site/?/home/

I have lots more info on these that I haven't had time to post. Btw, there were 642 of the S140 4x4's built in 1955 & 1956. IH made these trucks from 53 - 60 or 61 with minor equipment changes and body style changes approximately every couple of years. When the R140/160 4x4 was introduced in 53, it was the first factory produced 4x4 of the major brands.

Front axle has 5,000lb rating, rear has 10,000lb rating. IH gave a GVW of either 11,000lb or 13,000lb depending on some other options. Gears are 6.16:1. Rear axle may have a Detroit type locker in it. 4spd trans can be non-synchro (T9) or synchro (T98). If it has a factory front winch or a pto opening on the driver side of the trans, it's a T9 non-synchro.

Let me know if you need any help or more info.

Keep posting pics when you can.

---------- Post added at 09:43 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:41 PM ----------

Oh, and be careful with those drums, They're nearly impossible to find.

Good luck.
 

Steve Kunz

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Now speaking of brakes I just noticed the other day the right front wheel on the 57 looks like its leaking break fluid.
Hi Beth, have you made any progress on the brakes yet? If you haven't don't feel bad, I have not had a chance to tear into mine either. :bonk: Hopefully this spring, if no other projects manage to get in the way.
 

Andrew Mackey

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
05/14/2017
Nearly 2 years since Beth's last post. I too wonder how she made out with the brakes. have you had the truck on the road yet Inquiring minds want to know!:) I still miss my L-120!. The 1996 Dodge 1500 has gone for scrap - didn't last beyond 134,000 miles. 2nd trans and engine NFG, body rusting out,2nd rear shot, interior shot. Don't make 'em like they used to. "New ride, 3 years ago I got a Silverado Suburban. 2WD with the 454 engine. What a beats. Now has 150000 miles, and still kicking. body going south though - the running gear will outlast the body.
Andrew
 

Beth V

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
03/03/2018
I'm sorry to say that No, it has not received the brakes that it requires, but we MIGHT have it out to NTA in June since we are featuring IH. Stay Tuned!:wave:
 

uglyblue66

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
11/07/2018
If you rebuild a old wheel cylinder or master cylinder make sure there are NO pits at all.Even tiny 1's.That will cause a slow leak.
There is some folks I think in New York that resleeve wheel and master cylinders. I don't have the name handy but I learned about them when I was doing the brakes on the 47 pontiac.
Dot.5 fluid may help as it does not corrode stuff like dot 3 or 4 fluid.Nor will it jellyfi ,if that is a word.
A non stock splash sheild may help with that location issue.
 

Beth V

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
03/03/2018
The old girl is still sitting in the shop. My husband doesn't have time to mess with it--nope, the brakes haven't been fixed.....

Should Mom decide to find it a new home, anyone interested or know someone who would appreciate it? 4x4, winch, well restored....

Thanks
Beth
 

BoomerNC

Registered
Hi Beth - I'm a late comer to this thread, someone cross-posted it to a 140/160 4x4 group I belong to on Facebook. Been a member here for a few years but haven't been active recently.

I see that Geof checked in so you have a more accurate idea of what you have there. He can give you specifics about parts and availability. These 4x4s, the 140 & 160 were actually factory built using axles left over from WWII combined with the Timken divorced transfer case and transmissions Geof mentioned. Because of this, the brakes are their Achilles heel, using different parts than the more common 110/120/130 pickups.

IIRC, the 140 series is 1 1/4 ton and the 160 is 1 1/2. The 160 had a 2WD commercial version whereas the 140 was a stand-alone model - basically a R-150 with a live front axle added. The 140s started with the R series '53-'55 of which 995 were produced. The S series only lasted a year or two with fewer made. So there aren't a lot around, period.

I have a '55 R-140. As one old timer told me, "You won't have to worry about getting any speeding tickets with it, but it'll pull a house down the road at 35 MPH all day long".

The downside is, they are big and slow, definitely an acquired taste, and not for the rat rod/hot rod pickup crowd which means less desirable/fewer dollars. However, your dad's truck is probably the nicest one I've ever seen. Prior to this one, I've seen one other clean example that sold with 53K miles, a rust-free R-140, for $6500 on ebay in late 2014. The $10K mentioned previously might be a bit optimistic, but it never hurts to try. Having the 9 ft 'bonus box' pickup bed on back would add to the value. I like it just as it sits.

I've attached a photo of my rusty R-140 for comparison. I'll end up with a lot more into it than I can ever get out of it once it's done.
 

Attachments

Beth V

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
03/03/2018
Thank you. Not much will probably happen until the weather gets better. If the FB group has any great ideas, please let me know.
 

Tracy T

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
i had one of these only 2wd though, this was back before the internet. no one back then could find brake parts! now from what i remember they used a spicer rear axle so you should be able to switch backing plates, drums, shoes, etc from a newer truck with the same axle. GM would be tricky they made some of their own axles. i dont have any info on the front end since its 4wd. i would defenitly up grade two a dual master cylinder, if it were me i would look around for a school bus junked out. i have a IHC bus and it has hydraboost and will lock up all six tires if you want / need to. great looking old truck!
 
I was needing wheel cylinders for my 1961 International B160, I actually found them NOS at a local shop, WEBB’s Truck parts. Had to do some digging but I found them. So don’t give up.
 
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