"Abandoned/Forgotten" Engines

Beth V

Moderator
While much ado has been made about engines going overseas, what about those that sit abandoned?

I borrowed this from Tanner's picture collection (thanks Tanner!:wave:). I remember you posting that it sits in the middle of nowhere. Did it ever get rescued & if so, where did it go? I seem to remember a logistics challenge of moving it.

How about other "abandoned" engine stories...with happy endings!!

Thanks
Beth

 

KeithW

Active member
Re: "Abandoned" Engines

Sticky subject. (rant follows) :rant: There is abandoned as in "owner has surrendered all rights" and abandoned as in "owner still has rights and is not currently doing anything with it". If it is on private property it should belong to the land owner. If on public property it belongs to the government. In either case you need to track down the owner and get permission before so much as removing a single nut, much less taking name plates, governors, oilers, mixers or anything else you can haul off. I'm all for saving stuff from rusting into the ground but it is not an excuse for looting anything you can carry off. See how the judge buys "I was saving history" after you get caught hauling off someones private property. Too many formally working oil wells are inop due to stolen engine bits. :rant:(end rant). Lets do our bit but please let's do it right.

keithw
 

Tanner Remillard

Subscriber
Re: "Abandoned" Engines

The old Peerless is still sitting there. We flew over it last November. For some unknown reason, the owner doesn't want to get rid of it. Its sitting on a 54,000 acre spread where its used for cattle, and the owner doesn't even live there, he lives in Washington state. It is in really bad shape though. It worse than it looks in the picture. A new boiler would have to be built for it, and its missing a lot of parts. The front wheels are rotted through also.
 

LCJudge

Subscriber
Re: "Abandoned" Engines

I've never seen an engine that you could classify as "abandoned". Someone owns it. Now I have seen a lot that the owners are letting waste away. While that's sad, its theirs to let waste if they want. I remember trying to buy one of the old sight gas pumps several years ago. It sat beside this gent's barn and I asked him if he would sell it. He said "I will if I own it, but I think it belongs to my fuel distributor". I went to the fuel distributor and asked if he would sell it. Same story, yes but he would have to make sure the owner hadn't purchased it when it was sat at the site many years ago. So, I drew up a sales agreement that said "I _______ hereby sell any interest I may have in a visible site glass pump located at ______ for the sum of $100". I took it to both, got them to sign and handed each a $100. It didn't matter then who owned it, because now I did!
 

Beth V

Moderator
Keith,

I agree whole heartedly. Items-or the entire engine should NEVER be taken without the permission of the owners.

I was looking for an update on this engine as well as any others that sit out like this. It seems like such a shame, but it is a fact of life.

I've updated the title to include "Forgotten." Maybe that will clarify the objective.

Tanner,

It is engines such as this that I would prefer to see sit in a museum or on display in front of the "truckstop" instead of good working engines.

..If only our wishes came true.....;)...there are a few that I am quietly going after......:O

Thanks
Beth
 

Tanner Remillard

Subscriber
Yes I agree Beth, it would be a good engine to sit at a gate to the home place. I also know where a 12 h.p. Advance ( in really good shape I might ad) and a 45 h.p. Case are still out in the brush. :brows:
 

Beth V

Moderator
Tanner,

I'll be right out to get the 12 Advance!:D..I'll even make some of my triple chocolate brownies as a THANK YOU!

Beth
 

Milo Holroyd

Subscriber
I'm going to try to put in words, parts of a conversation from last fall, between my brother and I. My brother knows how much I am afflicted with the quest and restoration of "old iron".
Early last fall I got a phone call from him, that made the hairs on the back of my neck stand up. The conversation went something like this;

did ya hear about all of the old iron hauled out of one of the barns on the Kalamazoo College Property?
No, what was it?
well, a laborer that works on my crew has a brother that helped load it all.
Really? So what all did he load?
He (the laborer's brother) worked for three days loading lowboy trailers for a local excavator! not real sure what all he loaded. but he did say on the first day they hauled out 3 great big locomotive looking things, only they had big steel wheels on them!!! The rest of the "stuff" was old farm tractor looking things with big steel wheels!! and some other odd looking engines on steel wheeled carts and wooden skids!!
Geez, I got all worked up just typing about it. I got it bad:)
Man if I could come across something like that.......
 

Ben Busfield

Active member
I'm going to try to put in words, parts of a conversation from last fall, between my brother and I. My brother knows how much I am afflicted with the quest and restoration of "old iron".
Early last fall I got a phone call from him, that made the hairs on the back of my neck stand up. The conversation went something like this;

did ya hear about all of the old iron hauled out of one of the barns on the Kalamazoo College Property?
No, what was it?
well, a laborer that works on my crew has a brother that helped load it all.
Really? So what all did he load?
He (the laborer's brother) worked for three days loading lowboy trailers for a local excavator! not real sure what all he loaded. but he did say on the first day they hauled out 3 great big locomotive looking things, only they had big steel wheels on them!!! The rest of the "stuff" was old farm tractor looking things with big steel wheels!! and some other odd looking engines on steel wheeled carts and wooden skids!!
Geez, I got all worked up just typing about it. I got it bad:)
Man if I could come across something like that.......
so this was true ! mmmmmmm a friend of mine that lives in kzoo saw this too in passing and was rumored to have go to the god i hate to say the scrap yard there in town .. but this scrap yard is to have a few old buildings fill of stuff like as the owner cant seam to grind them up there are to be a hand full of skid boilers , steam tractors , portables , oilpulls and some other good things that we all would just love too have and cuddle up to but as i have never see them my self i cant say it true but there have been a few people i know that i know well and were not partaking in the masonjar when the storie was told ... so the truck take it to the scraper? my friend did not chase it down like i told him and bring it all to my place ....:(:confused:
 

Tanner Remillard

Subscriber
Well Beth, I'll give you a ride on the Advance for one of those brownies ;) We have tried several times to get them, BUT its the always famous quote that all of us gear heads love to hate........"well, by god were going to get that running one o' these days......." uuuuuuuuhhhhhhhhhh, yeah........ok:rolleyes:
 

Mark L. Jordan

New member
Here's an ENTERPRISE portable in Southern Kentucky. The owner agrees that it needs a home, but can't sell it right now. It was his granddad's engine, and passed down to his father. His father is still living, and wants to keep it.:( The owner said that after his father passes, then is the time to approach him. It is in it's original place where the mill was, and the whistle is mounted on a pipe at the rear of the boiler extending up about 10' (through the roof). The front flue sheet is rusted through, and there are the normal problems, but it is fixable I think.:confused:
 

Attachments

Joe Martin

New member
Wow, Mark, that is an awesome little machine. I've never seen one like that with 2 flywheels and the steam dome over the fire box. It would be worth a trip down just to see that one in the wild. Do you know of any others that are restored and making the shows?
 

Mark L. Jordan

New member
I've never seen one like that with 2 flywheels and the steam dome over the fire box.
Joe,
FRICK made probably more portables than any other manufacturer. They went for the sawmill business, with a smaller interest in making traction engines. This style is the standard design that Frick used, and many other manufacturers such as this Enterprise, as well as Farquhar, Orr & Sembower, and others used it as well. There are many portables of this design in existance, but not many of them are Enterprise engines. Notice the piston valve.

Mark J.
 

Attachments

David

Subscriber
Here's an ENTERPRISE portable in Southern Kentucky.
Note that it has skid rings on the front wheels like the one Brad Kelley knows about in Virginia.

It's a unique feature that I've never seen on any other brand of portable steam engine.

David
 

Tore Blom

New member
How about other "abandoned" engine stories...with happy endings!!

Thanks
Beth

Dear Beth,
how happy the end will be I will never see as they are all supposed to over live me, BUT the three engines I have in mind have at least been rescued from their old abandonments’.
The first little tiny unit is perhaps a freebuilt engine of 1920-22. With a Stafsjö engine from the 1880th on a then new built boiler. It had never been under cover as anybody could remember. Just could not resist it, joined our collection only two years back.
Next is supposed to be a large Munktells of about 1880. It was taken care of last summer. It was at least under the roof, but that was about all.

Found this third engine about 4 years ago. It is a two cylinder (duplex) Munktell from 1917. Was in the sawmill since the thirties. Again I just could not resist although I promised my brother we needed no more. He did however take responsibility and helped me sort it out in due course.

I do not expect we will find another anymore.

Good evening

Tore Blom
 

Attachments

Top