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Acme 12x12 Steam Engine

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Hello - I recently acquired my first steam engine! So far I have found little info about it. Does anyone know the age, HP, what is missing, if parts are available, is the serial number on the base or value? It is fresh out of the field and has been sitting for at least 40 years. The green paint appears original.
 

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JBoogie

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Age
37
Last Subscription Date
11/12/2013
Spare parts don't exist. Why did you haul it sitting on the flywheel?????????
 

Joe K

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Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
Well-driller engine. May have never had a governor since all the action of the engine was under the direct control of the operator.

Instead a stephenson link reverse to allow reversing the engine.

Flywheel looks like it may have had an "auxiliary drum" which I have seen on other engines of this ilk.

Joe K
 

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Yes, it wouldve been better to set it on a base of some sort. We simply picked it straight up from how it sat on the ground for decades. The head was resting on a timber. The flywheel hub broke through the trailer deck and the flywheel was very flat while moved. I was under a deadline to get it moved. Do you know the HP, age or value?
 

Larry G.

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Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
Sometimes you have to do what you do in a short period of time. Nice purchase!
Enjoy you new steam treasure.

Larry G. :)
 

Rumely Winch

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Last Subscription Date
11/16/2014
I have one like it mine is a Ajax looks just like it but say Ajax on the steam cest cover. They don't have governors, they had what they call driller wheel. The fly wheel has holes in it to bolt round weights on to counter balance the weight of the drill pipe.I have the weights for mine.
 

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Rumely - can you post pics of the weights? There is a lot of other stuff laying around that may go with this engine.
 

Jim Conte

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
07/17/2018
Using the PxLxAxN estimation, about 100 Hp.

150 PSI x 1 Ft stroke x 6" cylinder radius squared x 250 rpm / 33,000 Ft. Lb. / Minute

That comes to 128.5 estimated Hp.

In reality, it would probably never run at a full 150 PSI pressure, nor would it have run at 250 RPM, which would be a safe speed for that big flywheel .

As far as age, when where the oil drillers active in that area ? The early wells would have been drilled with steam power. After a well came in, there might be some natural gas available off the top of a shotgun separator. This could be used for more drilling power for more wells by using a gas engine conversion cylinder on a Half-breed engine. They use a common crank and frame. A steam cylinder or gas engine cylinder could be bolted on, interchangeably.
 

Joe K

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
Using the PxLxAxN estimation, about 100 Hp.

150 PSI x 1 Ft stroke x 6" cylinder radius squared x 250 rpm / 33,000 Ft. Lb. / Minute

That comes to 128.5 estimated Hp.

In reality, it would probably never run at a full 150 PSI pressure, nor would it have run at 250 RPM, which would be a safe speed for that big flywheel .

As far as age, when where the oil drillers active in that area ? The early wells would have been drilled with steam power. After a well came in, there might be some natural gas available off the top of a shotgun separator. This could be used for more drilling power for more wells by using a gas engine conversion cylinder on a Half-breed engine. They use a common crank and frame. A steam cylinder or gas engine cylinder could be bolted on, interchangeably.
About the only steam equipment that could claim the 150 psi are steam pumps - which are not usually designed to use steam expansively.

Most slide valve engine have cut-off at or beyond 60 percent of stroke. This might yield a cylinder average pressure (mean effective pressure) of perhaps 100 psi with 150 inlet.

More efficient engines (those that do use steam expansively) are typically a lower inlet pressure percentage than this. Also engines which are either throttle governed or "automatic" engines.

Massachusetts for years classified for licensing purpose engines according to horsepower. They calculated PLAN formula for corliss style engines at a mean effective pressure of 40 psi - this being a "typical" MEP for corliss of all kinds/sizes - including (believe it or not) compound engines based on the higher (or highest) pressure cylinder size and rpm only. The Massachusetts law resulted in a severe understatement of horsepower calculation for double eccentric or compound corliss engines. Such were the vagaries of license law.

So to calculate actual steam engine horsepower by the PLAN method, one has to have in mind some "typical for this application" MEPs.

IIRC, a Troy Engberg Piston Valve engine fed with steam at 125 psi (a laboratory test engine at my alma-mater) at full load has an MEP of between 82 and 78 psi. Cutoff was found with the steam engine indicator to be about 68 percent of stroke.

Joe K
 

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Great info? What HP do you estimate this engine is and do you have a guess of the manufacture year? I am guessing 30HP and 1920.
 

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The oil company who owns the land had scrappers come in and take all of the other engines. I don't know the age of them but guess they were 30s-50s era. I had the flywheel weight moved but did not get it in time. At least we saved the Acme.
 
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