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Air Compressor?

johnrod

Registered
I have a lot of sandblasting to do. so I want to put together a big air comp. I have a tank and motor. I have a 2 stage which need an OH job and will cost about $100 + time, or I can but a 2 cyl. Harbor Ft. for $112 + tax and bolt it on.
my question is: what is the advantage of a 2 stage over a 2 cyl. one stage.
thanks Rod in AZ
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Re: air comp. ?

Two stage is more efficient, more air flow for the same input hp.

Can also reach higher pressure, though not an issue just for blasting.

What make is your two stage pump? Repairing a good old US one will be money well spent compared to a modern one.
 

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Re: air comp. ?

I'm not sure about volume, but 2 stage lets you get higher pressure, typically 175psi, where a single stage is closer to 100-125psi. Kind of hard to recommend an HF pump:O. What is the old pump? What is wrong with old pump? Is it just not making air, or is it making bad noises?
 

s100

Registered
Re: air comp. ?

OP, something is seriously wrong here. You start out by saying that you "have a lot of sandblasting to do". Then you talk about a 2 stage compressor giving no particulars then you say you can replace the pump with something from Harbor Fright for $112. This at least gives some sense of scale. If your two stage pump is similarly sized to something you can buy new for $112, why waste your money? You can get just as good results blowing into a drinking straw.

If you are doing any amount of serious sandblasting of small parts in a blasting cabinet you may be able to get by with a good strong 5HP two stage compressor by a credible manufacturer, e.g. Quincy, Curtis or an old DeVilbiss like the model 342. You will have to stop periodically to let the compressor build up again but that may coincide with your shifting parts around, adding blast medium or fetching a beer. Better have a tank of at least 80 gallons and a second tank of similar size would be good too. If you have a big cabinet with a large nozzle and are blasting bigger parts better shoot for 7 1/2 - 10HP.

If you are blasting with a pressure pot blaster outdoors you probably want to start at 10HP and hope it can keep up. Best to buy a used tow-along gas or diesel compressor. A little one, maybe 85cfm, will be fine but most are in the 105 - 150cfm range. These will blast all day long and maintain decent pressure. (Unless you are blasting sheet metal more pressure is more better. 125psi is fine.)

Blasting is an extremely demanding application for a compressor. Cutting corners in this most important aspect will cost you in lost productivity and hours of frustration.
 
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