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Air Cooled - Red Wing Model - Almost Finished

Paul Spence

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Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
It’s been raining all day again, so I decided to clean up my small, inside garage work space a bit, and, under the work bench, tucked in the back on the shelf, I pulled out an almost completed air cooled Red Wing model I had purchased a few years back :uhoh: . I was told when I bought it, that it was almost done, but the machinist said he couldn’t get it to run, and just gave up :( . I had tried to buy it “NOW” at the time, but he wanted to let the auction run out. Anyway, I wound up with it for less at the auction end :O . When I got it, it did have several issues as to why it wouldn’t run so I put it away for a rainy day (I guess that's today). As I was looking it over (again) it needs a bit of work to get it running, but nothing I think, I can’t handle :eek: . Mostly fixing loose fittings, some spring work, crank shaft tightening, Gibb key work, valve seating, timing, finishing/polishing work, etc. It’s the "unknown etc.", that could be interesting :p , and I do have the drawings. In the pictures it looks good. I guess I’ll have “FUN”, even in NJ on the way through as I tackle this one, of many projects I have :shrug: .
 

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Steve Kunz

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Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Re: Air Cooled - Red Wing Model -ALMOST finished

Nice looking model Paul.
I have so many rainy day projects lined up.... if I lived in a rainforest I still could not get them all done! :crazy:
 

Paul Spence

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Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
Re: Air Cooled - Red Wing Model -ALMOST finished

As I'm working on this model, I found the "TIMER" arm is overly tight :( , when the shaft nut is secured, so I worked on getting the surfaces smooth to make things move easily ;) . Then I made up a custom, adjustable/lockable timer set up from a piece of 1” x 1” angle stock to hold the timer in position :O . A little drilling, cutting and filing, and it looks :uhoh: good. More to follow as I bring this model back to life the way it should be :rolleyes: . I think I’ll go in the shop, keeping busy, having “FUN”, even in NJ on the way through :) .
 

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Paul Spence

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Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
Re: Air Cooled - Red Wing Model -ALMOST finished

I worked on the governor & latch, which needed a lot of parts “clearance” adjustment :( with a die grinder, file, emery paper and spring changes to get it functioning smoothly ;) . The connecting rod, 3 piece bearing, was real loose and before I started to adjust the bearing, I marked the pieces to keep them there original position :brows: . After taking off 0.005” I made up a couple of shims to get the rod clearance where I want it to be :rolleyes: .
 

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Paul Spence

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Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
Re: Air Cooled - Red Wing Model -Almost Finished

The crankshaft on the model is a 5 piece built one (not cast), pinned together. I found the connecting rod throw “TIGHT, but the flywheel shafts were loose allowing the flywheels to rock back and forth a bit . Not only that, the keyways cut in both flywheels were not in alignment (parallel) with the flywheel web’s per the drawings (one was off by 5 degrees the other 10 degrees ?), and, the keyways in the crankshaft were both cut at different angles (to compensate-I think :confused: ) :bonk: . With those machining issues, no wonder the two flywheel WEB’s didn’t line up with each other and the whole rotating assembly(flywheels and piston) are out of sync/balance :( . I need to “FIX” all that, while really trying :uhoh: to have "FUN", even in NJ on the way through :shrug: .

See the crankshaft repair @ https://www.smokstak.com/forum/showthread.php?t=180841
 

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Andrew Mackey

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
05/14/2017
Re: Air Cooled - Red Wing Model -Almost Finished

I had similar issues with the Associated engine that Peters used as a sales mans sample for his casting kits. He used to run it at shows, and it bounced around like crazy :eek: The flywheels were not keyed properly. I need to get them re-cut, so the balance and spokes align. it did run good though. he had it in rough trim -no paint. I took it apart and painted it, and also made a crank guard for it. I still need to get a proper fuel tank for it.
Andrew
 

Paul Spence

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Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
Re: Air Cooled - Red Wing Model -Almost Finished

The valve springs were a bit to heavy and bent up :eek: , so I replaced them with ones found :uhoh: in my spring “stash”. As you can see in the 1st. picture the rocker arm is out of alignment (real loose in the pivot point). I found that the rocker pivot hole for the arm wasn’t exactly perpendicular, but fortunately :p the rocker arm stand was somewhat adjustable, and with some slight movement and a 0.008 brass washer, I got it to line up properly ;) . I still have a few other items that aren’t quite right that need attention as I work on this model(like the crankshaft repair :( ). Just doing a little at a time in trying to get this Red Wing model functional, while having "FUN", even in NJ on a rainy Tuesday :shrug: .
 

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Paul Spence

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Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
Re: Air Cooled - Red Wing Model -Almost Finished

Now that the crankshaft is done and on, I can continue on with the “Almost finished :eek: air-cooled Red Wing model. With the crankshaft in, the flywheels and governor on and the latch installed the “FITTING” begins to get things right :p . The latch out arm return spring setup “needs fitting”, the push rod “needs fitting”, the ignition pick up “needs fitting”, the pulley “needs fitting”, the LOOSE stuff “needs fitting”, the compression “needs fitting” (weak, but better with oil). The model was almost finished when I bought it :rolleyes: , and I found a lot of the machining was “NOT” to the drawings :shrug: . I wonder why the cylinder has two machined spark plug holes (one on top, and one underneath opposite it) :confused: . The model will be “almost finished” for awhile :shrug: , while I’m having “FUN”, even in NJ, on the way through.

In case you missed it, see the crankshaft repair @ https://www.smokstak.com/forum/showthread.php?t=180841
 

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Paul Spence

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Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
After my last post in 2018 making the crankshaft and putting it all together, the crank shaft just wasn’t right - LOOSE (my 1st time making one) :censored:. Then while at Cabin Fever in January 2019 I bought a crankshaft casting from P.M. Research who sent me the drawings on how to machine it. After buying some “stuff” to make the crankshaft, like a 2” piece of aluminum round stock, a new mill vise, some end mills, lathe bits and thinking of the time to do the job, I just called P.M. Research and bought a fully machined crankshaft ;). It arrived and I put the project away till yesterday, when I dragged it out from under the work bench with anticipation to just work on the Air Cooled Red Wing. I fussed with the engine a bit and with a few drops of oil the compression came right up but I had a small hissing around the head. With a little Gibbs sprayed around the head area, I found it was leaking compression at the spark plug hole :unsure:. The spark plug hole is to deep and the diameter too small for a regular 14mm socket or wrench to grab the plug flats to tighten the plug all the way down. So, while at the “FLEA” market today I bought ($1) a deep 14mm socket that I machined to fit the small diameter hole. Now to take things apart, fit the new crankshaft, put it all back together, fuss with it, get it finished and running while having “FUN”, even in NJ :rolleyes: on the way through .
 

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Paul Spence

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Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
It’s time to work on the Red Wing again and get it running so I pulled the crankshaft and flywheels off to install the new one. The new crankshaft had a few rough keyway and throw edges which had to be cleaned up for things to fit easily. I started the assembly, everything was going find and then what the heck, the connecting rod journal on the new one was 0.499”, and I never really noticed it was different than the old one at 0.425”, and just “ASSUMED” :confused: it was the same as the old one as it came built from the supplier. I checked the old prints that came with the model and guess what? The drawings showed it to be 0.500“, and it was made differently for some unknown reason at 0.425 “ .

Anyway, to make things work I needed to enlarge the rod bearing to 0.500” which was another project for the old mill and me. After all the setup 🥴 for this 1” square (+/-) bearing block, I got the bearing opened up to 0.500 and put things together, turned the crank and “HOUSTON”, we have another problem. The larger rod journal made the rod throw a bit larger and the connecting rod now hits the lower part of the cylinder. What to do, turn the tapered rod down (no), mill the cylinder base to lower it (no), notch the cylinder for the connecting rod clearance (probably) to make it work. Just another dimensional error by the previous builder that creates problems down the road. I GUESS I’ll get it later than sooner. After a nights restless sleep on what to do, I got out the seldom used BRTF (Big Round Tapered File) and proceeded to file away making clearance in the cylinder for the connecting rod. After a bit I got it right and then assembled all the parts. Still have to get it set up for running - NEXT while having "FUN" ;), even in NJ on the way through
 

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Paul Spence

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Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
I hooked up the battery and buzz coil, and turned the engine over to check the spark timing and was getting extra sparks from the timer area. Upon close inspection I found the timer pickup guide was in backward and rubbing on the gear so I put it in right, Then I noticed a loss of what compression I had and noticed that the push rod bearing was hanging up on the timing gear keeping the exhaust valve open. A slight 1/32” adjustment of the timing gear shaft took care of that. All the while, I noticed that the intake valve didn’t seem to want to move much on the intake stroke even though the spring was weak. The model mixers valve spring seemed a bit too strong, so I removed the entire assembly to check it out. With the mixer off, the intake valve fluttered as it should on the intake stroke (y) . The mixer valve spring is much to heavy and the valve is hanging up in its guide. I took it apart, polished the valve stem and inside of the guide that helped a bit, but still is a problem :unsure: I need to fix another time. I just want the Red Wing to run :cautious: . So, I just left the valve out and tried to run the engine again with starting fluid and more air intake. Flip-Flip of the flywheels, it started :eek: , and I was “FINALLY” able to get a short video of it running :) . I still have a lot more to do on it ;), but I got it running while having “FUN”, even in NJ on the way through.

 

Paul Spence

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
The exhaust valve latch arm was hanging up a bit, so I took it off to see what the problem was 🤔 . Seems the recess in the latch arm for the return spring was bored off center and the spring was catching on the edge, and the spring was a wee bit to long and when compressed did not allow the latch to fully engage. I bored out the recess (centered it), shortened the spring, that problem solved. Next was I’m still having a slight compression leak around the head someplace. I can hear it but can’t isolate it. GIBBS to the rescue, and bubbles only appeared around the intake valve stem on the compression stroke. I don’t really want to pull the head to seat the intake valve, but I might have to if I can’t get it to seat in place by spinning the valve. Well, spinning the valve didn't work so I removed the head and this is what I found for the intake valve 🤔. An almost valve with an almost valve job by the previous builders project gone awry :( .
 

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Kevin O. Pulver

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Age
54
it's a good thing you got that engine Paul!
The poor thing would have never made it otherwise. I can understand a machinist might not understand how an engine works and mess things up if he can't follow the prints.
BUT What was the guy thinking with that valve?
 

Brian Lynch

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/13/2019
Some people's ideas are better left unsaid. It is obvious the former owner had no idea how close the tolerances on the models have to be. I'm glad you were able to get it straightened out Paul. You deserve a medal for that one! P.M. Research is about 3 miles from where I live. I know a few of the fellows that work there, some being former fellow employees of RMT/Lufkin Gear.
 

Paul Spence

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Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
Brian: I met with Paul and Jim from P.M. Research Saturday at the Cabin Fever Expo and showed them the valve. More to follow - Getting excited ;) with this nice little engine project :rolleyes: .
 
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