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Air Cooled Red Wing model.

Manorfarmdenton

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I thought anyone not familiar with the air-cooled Red Wing model might be interested in some photos of progress with my new castings set. They came from Forest Classics here in the UK as a Christmas present from my wife!

First photo is the set of castings, difficult to obtain fixings, finished rings etc.
 

Manorfarmdenton

Registered
1) With mandrel in place, checking that the cylinder sits squarely on the base. The milled surfaces, plug and lubricator and mounting bolt holes were machined, drilled, tapped, etc with the mandrel assembly mounted on the vertical mill.

2) Back in the lathe to machine the cooling fins (using an inserted-tip parting tool).
 

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Manorfarmdenton

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Work in progress on the head. It is clamped in a jig by the spigot that protrudes into the cylinder. I turned this first, holding the casting in the chuck with pads of copper (bits of water pipe) to protect the bit that will show.

With luck I'll get the head finished today (Sunday). We have snow on the ground and a few hours in the workshop with the heater on sounds quite attractive! Mind you, a ride in the snow on a tractor might be fun too..............
 

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Edwin

Guest
Looking good ,looks like it will be pretty easy for you,good luck and i cant wait to see it when your done its going to be one sweet engine when its completed.I have an the same air cooled that i got from ebay i needed some work i was able to make a few things for it.I like the look of the air cooled rather than the hopper cooled engine.
 

chrsbrbnk

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I like the mandrel/chuck for the cylinder ! Its always inspirational and intresting to see pics of machining setups . Chris
 

Manorfarmdenton

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Thanks Chris. There are several ways to get round most situations, and I agree that its good to see what others do given the same task.
 

Manorfarmdenton

Registered
I had a good session today, thanks to the snow outside.

First pic is the valve seats being machined, with the head upside down in its mounting block.

Second pic is the exhaust and inlet ports going in, head still in its block, and indexed round 90 degrees for the two ports using the bolt holes to position it.
 

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Manorfarmdenton

Registered
Here the cylinder is clamped in the vice by the mounting pads that hold it to the base, and the head stud holes are being drilled and tapped. I positioned them by dimension from the drawing rather than by drilling through the head, and its always nice (well, for an amateur like me anyway!) when the head slips down the studs without any force necessary!

The final pic shows progress to date.
 

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gbritnell

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The work you're doing looks great. By the looks of it you're no stranger to machining. If I may ask a question, why do you make your valve seats so wide? It seems like it would be hard to seat the valves on such a large area.
Thanks,
gbritnell
 

BrianThomas

Registered
Very nice to see one of these going together. I myself am building one and just about ready to start it. Many set ups have included the use of super glue and some home made arbors to get it done. Post pics and a lot of them. I love seeing pictures during a build.
 

Manorfarmdenton

Registered
Thanks guys.
gbritnel - I have done a lot of bigger stuff over the years, but this is only my second model. I'm very much a beginner at getting things right to a thou or so! Good point about the valve seats! I did them to the od on the drawing, as I did with my watercooled Red Wing, but I did hve to do a lot of grinding in with that, and I can see what you're saying. Next time.........

Brian - I did a lot of part holding with super glue on my last-year's Red Wing too. Like you I think pictures of a build help a lot - two heads are usually better than one?

Below, machining the push-rod slot with the head in situ, and drilling and tapping the guide-plate holes. For tapping a hole I have just drilled using a drill chuck on a threaded shank held in the collet chuck in the vertical mill, I put the tap in the drill and slacken the collet and unscrew the shank until it is free to slide in and out, then turn it with my fingers to cut the thread. I dont know whether this is common practise, and possibly the purists will say it wears the shank eventually, but it keeps the tap aligned perfectly and gives very sensitive feel for even the smallest ones involved in building the Red Wing.
 

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Manorfarmdenton

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Progress to date. Crankshaft gear bored and reamed. Timing gear shaft done, and latch out bar pin. The push rod is a nice sliding fit in its two slots - next session I'll make the retaining plates. The crankshaft is one I made for my first Red Wing and then didnt use because I decided the crank webs were too skimpy i.e. not enough metal left after the holes were drilled in them. With hindsight though I think its fine, so I'm intending to use it this time. It is fabricated from silver steel with high strength Loctite and will be taper pinned as I did with the other one. To assemble it I used a length of 3/4" silver steel to hold two small vee blocks while I super glued them to a length of 2" x 1/2" ground flat stock, then used that jig to hold the crankshaft wile the Loctite went off. I then put one end in the Bantam chuck and held my breath while I clocked the far end, and it was true to less than a thou. Beginners luck? This and the heavier one both turned out like that though, so perhaps there was a certain amount of competence involved, rather to my surprise!
 
E

Edwin

Guest
The build is coming along great, im looking forward to seeing your progress and pictures.You do good machine work.

---------- Post added 02-09-2012 at 12:27 AM ---------- Previous post was 02-08-2012 at 11:29 PM ----------

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rWIgiS6OyZQ
my air cooled Redwing no fuel tank at this point.
 

Manorfarmdenton

Registered
A bit more progress today. Latch out bar machined and fitted, bought-in lube kit tried out for fit, camshaft sleeve machined, pushrod retaining plates made and fitted. I used steel instead of the brass specified on the plan as my watercooled kit came with little bits of cast iron to make the plates from and I dont think the original would have brass ones? Or am I wrong about that?
 

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Manorfarmdenton

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I find these charts REALLY useful. They were given to me years ago by Cromwells, from whom I get my engineering supplies. I mounted them on a couple of boards on the workshop wall and refer to them all the time. The one on the right - decimal equivalents - is so handy for cross referencing imperial, metric, letter and number drills etc. I think they are still available from Cromwells if anyone in the UK is interested in obtaining some.
 

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