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All in the fight against doing myself injuries

Scotty 2

Registered
Hello all
I'm getting old and my body seems to be not so forgiving doing hard yakka any more. My hands are buggered, one knee was done last year and early next year I have to have the holes where my guts are hanging out fixed up. So enough is enough. Life wasn't meant to be so painful so I've been working towards making my hobby a bit easier on my body for the last few years. One thing that is on the list was a bobcat to move things around and it would be handy on the farm. Moving heavy things was a must.
We haven't got the bobcat yet but we picked up a little forklift at the scrappies in Brisbane to do some lifting. I thought it was the forklift they used in the yard but I noticed it hadn't been moved since I'd first noticed it. So I asked. That was a Wednesday and it was going to be cut up on Thursday. Champion. He's a little Komatsu electric jobby. He's only 7 years old and done under 6,000 hours. He had no batteries (already cut out) but they drove it off the tilt tray so what could I lose?
Bugger it...we'll buy it.
So when I got Frank home I chucked some truck batteries (also from scrappy) in him and away he went. What a corker. :D
The best thing is, with only 4 truck batteries, Frank has about an hour running time so he can't go far. How good is that as an excuse when someone wants to borrow him? He'll be handy when the sheds go up too I suppose. :rolleyes:

What have you brought/made/acquired to make your hobby easier on your body?

Cheers Scott

As Frank was found waiting for the gas axe



Home on the farm

 

Thaumaturge

In Memory Of
Age
68
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
She's a beauty Scotty. Years ago I took to using the heck out of an electric truck winch to do my heavy work. Work smarter not harder!
Doc
 

typak

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/30/2019
Well indeed I haul engines with the mighty Howard 2000, it's the high speed model with disc brakes for added safety.
 

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b7100

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Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
I have reached the point in life to where I can't pick up 20# any more. I have this I bought about 10 years back. It was a fixer upper that did service in New Orleans when Catrina went through. One drive motor and the pump had to be rebuilt. After using it 6 mos. the engine had to be rebuilt. The bucket was rebuilt. The grabber is home built. A set of forks is home built. I have an overhead crane in my sbop that covers my entire shop that is home built. I have 4 different elevators and stair climbers to get me where I need to be around my buildings. I have a 36 volt electric scooter to get me where I got to go faster than I ever could walk. I should be sit'n in a rocker on the front porch watching the traffic go by. But I am still out in my shop ( heated with wood) doing what I have always done - being a productive member of society trying to keep out of the grave.
 

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Steve Kunz

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Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
That's a nice looking forklift Scott. Make sure the ground is solid, they like to get stuck easy!
I have a Case skidsteer loader. It serves two purposes, lifting as well as digging. It sure comes in handy and is a back saver.
 

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Ronald E. McClellan

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Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
I collect mostly smaller but early engines and my collection is in my basement. The engines that I put on the shelves by myself 10 to 15 years ago are too heavy for me now. I bought a small hand operated fork lift. It is rated at 400 lbs and takes up the space of a slightly larger floor dolly. I can use the forks or put the bar on top to attach a strap also can use that flat top that you see setting at the bottom. I then made a set of rails to sit on the stairs leading out of the basement. I made a dolly that gets hooked up to a electric winch that raises and lower my engines from/to the basement. Ron
 

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b7100

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Hey Scotty2 - a little off subject but when you flush your toilet does the water spin clockwise or counterclockwise? I heard a rumer that down under it goes counterclockwise.
 

Scotty 2

Registered
She's a beauty Scotty.
Doc
Hello Doc.
Thanks to those who told us about how they lift stuff. I thought I was flash as a rat with a gold tooth when we got the pallet jack but Frank is a whole lot better. I can sit on Frank and drive. The pallet jack is limited to the concrete. Frank was a whole lot cheaper then the pallet jack too. Scrap is worth about $90 a ton to buy apparently. I thought he was worth buying simply for the battery charger and hydraulic rams. I thought I could make a pretty decent magneto magnetiser out of the charger seeing mine was borrowed, never to be seen again, and the rams would be handy for one project or another if nothing else. :O
Frank won't be able to lift the rated 1,800 kg as the batteries acted as a counter balance. I tried him on the V8 Perkins and the genset and the forks kept going up the mast, the back of Frank lifted as well. We'll be happy if he picks up 750-1,000kgs with the truck batteries. Been able to lift about 6m will be handy in putting stuff like the smaller engines and parts on pallet racking. Frank's side shift will be handy putting stuff up. Frank will effectively give us more usuable floor space in the shed. That'll be good. The pallet jack simply won't do that.

Franks a shocker on rough ground as the mast has about 40mm of clearance if the mast is tilted right back and closer to 10mm tilted forward, but I've had him down to the hayshed and back up. No problems as it's dry as. The hayshed and Perkins can be seen in the background in the picture below.
Having the small smooth tyres is also a bit of a drawback but Frank will, more then likely, just do his job in the shed lifting and moving stuff. A bobcat is still on the shopping list next year. In the mean time if Frank gets stuck we can get Freddy the Ford 3000 out. If he gets real stuck then we invite the neighbour over for smoko. He'll come in his big tractor which will either pluck Frank out or turn him into a plow.

I have a Case skidsteer loader. It serves two purposes, lifting as well as digging. It sure comes in handy and is a back saver.
That is the sort of machine we'll be after. An open cab without AC to stuff up. We'll be looking for an older machine without all the electronics. We have a bit of fencing to do so the aux. hydraulics and bucket will be handy.

a little off subject but when you flush your toilet does the water spin clockwise or counterclockwise? I heard a rumer that down under it goes counterclockwise
It's true. It's called the coriolis effect. I wonder which way it goes on the equator?

Cheers Scott

 

typak

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/30/2019
That's a nice looking forklift Scott. Make sure the ground is solid, they like to get stuck easy!
They do get stuck easy even with pneumatic's fitted, this Cat 6000 lbs is not so bad with the wide wheels but still gets stuck constantly, it will also pick up very much more that its rating making it pretty useful for the larger lifts around here, the old forks will lift more than their rated load capacity that's for sure!
 

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rodneyt

Registered
" I wonder which way it goes on the equator? "

a few years ago friends of ours told us about seeing this when they went to Africa,
they were quite amazed it 'worked' when only a few feet away from the 'equator'.
sounded feasable to me, 'seeing is believing' etc,
but it is not so simple, if you believe this lot:

https://www.metabunk.org/debunked-the-equator-drain-trick-direction-of-water-flow.t6518/

most toilets ive watched go down with a 'flushing' action rather than a 'swirling' action.

if what the debunk guys say is right,
it would depend on which direction the inlet pipe was 'off-centre'.

totally agree that forklifts are one of the biggest time and labour savers around,
also agree they are very good at going down with any 'off-road' action.

a couple years ago we did a vintage truck run, and were able to rescue a vintage forklift,
which the Denmark Restoration Group guys had tested the limits of.
mobile skyhook labour-saver proved better than a direct tow.

cheers Rod.
 

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Scotty 2

Registered
Hello all
Crikey....lucky the mobile skyhook was around when the forklift went down Rod. They are handy bits of gear those mobile skyhooks. A good friend of ours has a doozy and here's Freddy getting ready for a road trip.




Also I remembered about this old girl. It's a Cranvel Sputnik tow behind back hoe that a really nice chap in Stanthorpe converted to be a bit of a yard crane. It's got a side valve Ford V8 in it.



Here's a trailer I built years ago to cart the ride-on mower about. It's also handy for carting smaller engines to rallies. It has a removeable braked winch on the front, the tray tilts and it's low to the ground. It's just a matter of dropping the ramps, pulling the pins for the tilt and off the engines go or dropping the ramps, pull the pins for the tilt and wind them on. It works quite well without the need to struggle or straining.
When it's used as a mower trailer, we drive the mower up the tilted bed and the bed comes down when we're up far enough. It's a matter of hopping off and putting the tilt pins back in.
It's actually an experiment for a larger trailer I want to build. So far the experiment works well.

Cheers Scott

 
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cobbadog

Registered
Frank N. Stein looks good Scotty.

Each visit to the scrappies pick up a lump of steel and take it back with you and tack weld it in place. Slowly you will get back the counterbalance effect. Even with new LAR (low aspect ratio) tyres which is on the front of Frank the tread pattern is not really too luggy and wont give the bite you need for off road work except in the dry.

For me I use the big winch on Lorry when something might "fail to proceed" or in the case of Humpty no weight over the drive wheels and no traction so he gets dragged up the ramps.
Pre Lorry I fitted an engine lift crane on the draw bar of the box trailer which then allowed me to put the aluminium ramps away in the shed for a better use. (not found one as yet, but I'm patient).

Scotty how do he wheels on your trolleys fit the ramps? The ramps look wider than the wheel tracks.
 

Merv C

Registered
I kept my forklift after I sold up, it is a three ton Hyster. I have some pallet racking where I keep some unrestored stuff. The shed where my engines are is not high enough for useful pallet racking but I do have some in it. I do have lots of space.

I have a lot of engines on a base that I can use with the fork lift. When I go to a rally I put them on a trolley and then I can winch them on and off my trailer. All my big engines are portable and I can move by lifting them under the steering axle and put them where I want them.

I found out years ago that big engines were easier to handle because you had to have lifting equipment like a forklift.

Merv
 

Scotty 2

Registered
Scotty how do he wheels on your trolleys fit the ramps? The ramps look wider than the wheel tracks.
They slide in and out or can be taken right off. When they're slid together in the middle there is about a 125mm gap between them. You can kinda see it in this picture if you close your left eye and squint with your right.

We have a bit of pallet racking already Merv. But it's in the old dairy and it's not accessible with Frank. When we get the big shed up it'll all be moved. 3 shelves will save an enormous amount of floor space I reckon.

Cheers Scott

 

E27N

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/06/2020
This thing is magic! Forgive the mess I’d only just finished putting it on.
BC91CB44-3D61-488C-8509-5910C8111FB2.jpg

46AAFDCC-0F5F-42E0-AEE7-5A3868C53A1B.jpg

D3A8A1BB-843C-41B9-9DA3-68962AA229D4.jpg
 

Tim B

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
05/06/2019
I got a mast off of a walk behind lift and made it a 3 point attachment. It will lift 4000 lbs to 132" high, but too much for the little Bota. I also made a set of forks for the front bucket.
The inside lift is some pallet rack beams welded up w/ a Harbor Freight hoist on trolley.
I'm still dreaming of making a small mobile lift for the shows to unload and load when there.
 

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Scotty 2

Registered
Hello Tim.
What were you trying to catch to have a miss that left the net up there? :O

Nice setup with the truck Mr E27. The compressor under would be handy in the field. I see Palfinger and the like make fairly good sized 12V cranes. The little PC 1500 or 2700 would be handy on the back of the ute I have to pick up. I can dream :rolleyes:
Is the crane you fitted electric Mr E27? I just can't make out what's on the end of the oil tank.

So far engines and the like have been discussed after they've been put on a trolley or something to make loading easy. How do you pickup engines and lumps of cast iron in the wild? Mr E27 is set. So far we've been lucky as the vast majority of in the wild finds have had skids of some description under them. I just winch them up the ramps and on. With the ones without skids I've usually resorted to taking the engine crane with me, lifting the chunk of iron and backing the trailer under. It works OK for small stuff but I still have to get the engine crane on and off the trailer. When I use the little trailer room can be a problem if the recovered iron doesn't fit between the legs of the engine crane.

Laundry tubs and the like are better then the dunny bowl to watch the coriolis effect. We just don't have enough water in the bottom of the bowl for the effect to be effective. I think you blokes in the US have a pretty full bowl where we have a fairly empty bowl. Our flushes only use a small amount of water as well. About 12-14 litres max isn't it?

Cheers Scott
 

I like oldstuff

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/09/2015
A lot of new toilets in the us and can are 3.8 litres per flush. Sometimes it takes a couple hits if a python sized load gets lodged in them.
 

E27N

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/06/2020
Hello Tim.
What were you trying to catch to have a miss that left the net up there? :O

Nice setup with the truck Mr E27. The compressor under would be handy in the field. I see Palfinger and the like make fairly good sized 12V cranes. The little PC 1500 or 2700 would be handy on the back of the ute I have to pick up. I can dream :rolleyes:
Is the crane you fitted electric Mr E27? I just can't make out what's on the end of the oil tank.

So far engines and the like have been discussed after they've been put on a trolley or something to make loading easy. How do you pickup engines and lumps of cast iron in the wild? Mr E27 is set. So far we've been lucky as the vast majority of in the wild finds have had skids of some description under them. I just winch them up the ramps and on. With the ones without skids I've usually resorted to taking the engine crane with me, lifting the chunk of iron and backing the trailer under. It works OK for small stuff but I still have to get the engine crane on and off the trailer. When I use the little trailer room can be a problem if the recovered iron doesn't fit between the legs of the engine crane.

Laundry tubs and the like are better then the dunny bowl to watch the coriolis effect. We just don't have enough water in the bottom of the bowl for the effect to be effective. I think you blokes in the US have a pretty full bowl where we have a fairly empty bowl. Our flushes only use a small amount of water as well. About 12-14 litres max isn't it?

Cheers Scott
Hey Scotty,

The truck is an ex turf management company truck so the compressor was already on it, I just serviced it and put new rubber mounts on it. It needs a hose reel though. What you can’t see in the pics is the full width hyd bi-fold ramp at the back and the 17000lb ( yes three zeros) winch behind the crane, it pulled that Hart Parr I had pics up of with ease.

Crane is a WA made Kevrek 1500, good for 1.25 t and 375kg @ 5 m full hyd slew and extension except for the last metre which is manual. Powered by a 12v powerpack under the tray, kevrek have a manual spool valve with built in switching so you can feather the controls.

Cheers Andrew
 
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