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An engine on eBay from the old WI Steam Rodeo

J

Jim Jake Templin

Guest
Fellers,

I wasn't intending to denigrate anyones engine nor taste thereof, just observing that it sure seemed like a lot of work to render a piece of machinery useless for what it was intended to do. I have always thought that a guy doesn't "own" anything if it is an item of historic or cultural interest, he just has custody of it until the next generation. I realise that there was a different mindset then.

One thing that I will observe, wearing the regulatory hat of a boiler inspector, is that such races, and other stunts, call into question the judgement and professionalism of steam enthusiasts. Some of the inspectors that would just as soon see every boiler cold have cited these steam races and hill climbings as evidence that steam people are more interested in playing with choo choos than safety. One flat out told me when I stated most operators are more intimately familiar with the ins and outs of safe boiler operation than a lot of folks that draw a check from doing it daily, that " I don't care how good they are...$%#!!, all the ones I have seen want to race them and pop wheelies...they scare the &^*!! out of me!"

I know nobody is no longer racing them anymore (and we aren't staging trainwrecks and purposefully flying airplanes into barn mockups anymore, either- and both of those used to be big draws at state fairs) but we may still be paying for some of the sins of the fathers.
 

David

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/27/2019
Mr. Teeter had one in WV that was really neat, and he called it a "road locomotive" and it brought great joy to many folks around Franklin. It was a neat engine that looked like a train, but it was built on a bus frame with a Soule engine and a Frick boiler. I think he told me it would go as fast as 50 or 55 mph. It always seemed a little strange as a kid to see a "train" with a steering wheel! :)

Jeff Smith

I bought Eston Teter's engine about five years ago. It utilizes a 1925 Frick boiler from a 7 1/2 X 9 portable, and a Soule reversible double cylinder steam engine. It is certified for operation by the state for 150 psi.

The truck frame is from a Ford S-700, with a two-speed rear end.

I first read about it in the IMA in 1962 when I was about eight, and thought it would be the ultimate in a hobby engine.

The Soule engine was badly worn, and I have replaced it with a brand new one, one of the last three they built.

The road locomotive got new tires, rims, and hydraulic brakes so it can be safely operated.

As far as speed, it will run as fast as you want to go and still be able to stop safely. (Within one-half the range of vision, as Bro. Templin knows from the railroad.)

It has been a lot of fun, and you can sit down and run it without having grease and oil slung on you. No gear noise, either.

As Eston said in 1962, with the whistle blowing and the bell ringing, you can let people know you're not part of a funeral procession.

Attached picture shows Mr. Teter on the left the day we moved the engine to NC.

David
 

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Jeff Smith

Registered
Last Subscription Date
08/05/2018
I saw some old 8mm film footage of Mr. Teeter operating his Road Locomotive and he was not afraid of the throttle! I can't remember if the film had sound or not, but it was from when the machine was newly completed.

The last time I saw the Road Locomotive was around 1990 when I went over to Cherry Grove to look at the Huber traction engine and I went back home via Franklin and the festival was in full swing so I stopped for a while and looked around.

There are a couple of engines on truck frames at Cumming, GA.

Jeff Smith
 
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J

Jim Jake Templin

Guest
Brer David,

wasn't the Teter engine put together to basically get a portable boiler around to tobacco bed steaming jobs faster?

I have seen pictures and info on it through the years, and always thought it was a neat way to combine fairly varied componants (Frick Boiler, Truck Frame, Soule carriage feed engine) into a coherent whole.

If fuel prices don't start getting lower, you may be firing that thing up to get to town for groceries!:eek:
 

Jeff Smith

Registered
Last Subscription Date
08/05/2018
Rev JJ,
For the most part, the only tobacco that is/was grown in WV is the ILLEGAL type that the government seizes along with the whiskey stills! :eek: I have many old photos of where farmers tried to grow tobacco, but the climate and topography did not lend itself to the crop. The only times I ever saw the Road Locomotive, it was strictly for pleasure. He did have a TT Peerless traction engine that he placed on his sawmill once a year to saw with as a demonstration.

Jeff Smith
 

Sam Shublom

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
07/14/2019
Well, the Northwest rubber tired rig sold for $8099. Anybody have an idea of who got it?

Sam
 

David

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/27/2019
wasn't the Teter engine put together to basically get a portable boiler around to tobacco bed steaming jobs faster?
Eston found the boiler (with no engine) at a sawmill site near his home where it had been abandoned. He said it took him about eight years to gather all the components and put them together.

He got the idea for a road locomotive after seeing the Swartz Valley Express engine at a show in PA. While looking the engine's drive train over, the owner came by and told him to stop looking at his drive train. Eston asked him why he had it at a show if he didn't want anyone to look at it.

He had friends over at a nearby town, and he liked to run the engine over there on weekends. When told by the local version of Barney Fife that his engine was not legal for street use and that he was subject to arrest, he went down to his local DMV and got a farm vehicle plate for it.

He said he enjoyed blowing the whistle a lot more when running down the main drag after the engine was street legal.

David
 

OTTO-Sawyer

Subscriber
Age
57
Last Subscription Date
07/15/2019
Just did a quick search hoping to find some video footage of the steam rodeo but came up empty.

Searching Steam Engine Races I came up with slow-race from Pawnee back in 2008 reminiscent to what we used to in Freeport back in the 1970s.



But so far I haven't come across any FAST-Races for Traction Engines OR Truck conversions.

Would be Cool if someone had some old home movie footage of the steam-truck rodeo races they could digitize and get uploaded.

I assume it would be like several of THESE racing along side each other at "Breakneck speeds".....:O



In the mean time though I did find this entertaining digital animation of a locomotive race, complete with Pit Crew prepping them before the race.:D
Boy, talk about your STREAMLINER'S.



:wave:
 

TomBall

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/26/2019
OTTO-SOYER, thanks for that video of the steam engine race. I got quite a chuckle from it and my day is starting out on the right foot because of it.
 

OTTO-Sawyer

Subscriber
Age
57
Last Subscription Date
07/15/2019
While going through the old photo albums in our Club's Museum snapping digital shots of some of the pictures for our Facebook page I came across this RUSSELL on a truck Chassis :cool: from back in 1983 or 84 at our Threshing Show in Freeport Illinois.

Haven't got a clue who owned it.:shrug:

Has anyone else ever seen it or know who owned it or have any idea where it might be now ?:shrug:

I see my Buffalo Springfield Road Roller setting there at the far left side in the middle row of the 3rd picture too. Didn't realize it was still running at that time as the last I remembered seeing it there was in the mid/late 70s. I bought it in the early/mid 90s.

:salute:
 

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