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Another, What the heck is it!?

Tracy T

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
I picked this up at a estate sale. amish, nobody knew what it was! i looked this thing over for a week before i decided to get it. Had make offer on it, so i offered $1 and now its mine. dont look like its is made for digging, its shaped wrong. the metal extends up the front and back of the handle i would say a good foot and a half. handle is close to eight feet long. so just what is it?
 

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Tracy T

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
well, it may be. I thought it might have been used in setting telephone poles and they did bring that up in your link. we will see what the other members come up with.
 

Ed Bays

Registered
Last Subscription Date
12/14/2013
Tracy is correct! There is also an odd looking, long handled, scissor-action manual post hole digger that goes with the set-up. Many of the shovels get used around here for cleaning out culverts/tin whistles.
 

MSchreiber

Subscriber
Meade electric is changing my service pole tuesday for nipsco because of a turning lane going in across the street. I'm gonna go out there with mine ans see if any know what it is. They're vacudigging my pole hole.
 

Scotty 2

Registered
+1 - the Pitman Polecat and similar line truck bodies were invented for good reason.
The crow-bar was another thing I never wanted to see or use again. I got back at mine. I turned it into a dinner triangle like they used on Bonanza.
Now it's a signal for happiness. 🍖🍗🥓

I ended up getting another crowbar. I forgot how useful they are..
 

Colin O

Registered
We had one similar where I worked. We called it a spoon and it was used to clean out the sediment from the bottom of concrete catch basins in roads, parking, lots, etc. With the use of modern vacuum trucks, not used very often anymore

Colin O
 

rider5

Registered
Agreed it is for cleaning out the loose dirt, rock in the bottom of a deep hole. It is usually used with a similar but straight spade when digging holes for setting power poles in places where you could not get to with an auger. Also used when digging deep foundation holes where the bottom of the hole had to flare out. Have dug 9 inch holes that flared out to 18 inches 9 to 10 feet deep for the power company in Corpus Christi, Tx. Supposed to be good to a 200 mph wind load.
 

Tracy T

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
10 foot deep for a pole, damn thats deep! surprised you were not at water level in the flat land! when i lived in florida you would sometimes hit water just digging a fence post. easy digging though, here not so easy!
 

rider5

Registered
10 foot deep for a pole, damn thats deep! surprised you were not at water level in the flat land! when i lived in florida you would sometimes hit water just digging a fence post. easy digging though, here not so easy!
Not really sure of the depth for a pole, the 10ft was for a reinforced concrete pedestal for steel poles in CPL's power distribution yard and when I first saw the specs I thought it was overkill too. But hurricanes do tend to be common in the area. lol And the high water table was a bit of a problem setting light poles on the Corpus naval air station but that's another story.
 

Duey C

Subscriber
Age
56
Last Subscription Date
12/08/2019
We had a 90 degree shovel used for much the same thing. I saw that second pic and knew too.
I used one as a teenager cleaning out loose stuff in the bottom of holes for pole sheds, especially the deeper ones.
Dad put up a pole building at the fairgrounds when I was a teenager and we went 6 feet deep+ so we got below the frost line on that swampy low ground. It still looks great! A newer building has had the addition all pushed out of shape due to the frost push.
 

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