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Anticorrosion in Engines

Rumely6a

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
There may be a better place to log this question on the Stak forum but here goes

After rebuilding these old engines what is the practice to keep / limit corrosion and scale from future buildup? Of course routine engine running and maintenance; avoiding water with lots of minerals etc. I there the "magic"product out there to treat engines that mostly sit idle?

Do people find the anti corrosion treatment on the store shelf next to the antifreeze effective? I have used that for years in the newer tractors but as have not opened those up so unsure as to effectiveness.
 

G Willikers

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
05/01/2019
I have antifreeze in all my tractors. It is supposed to have anti-corrosion properties. Have had good luck for going on 40 years.
 

Phil Johnson

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
I use good antifreeze with clean rainwater and have had no problems with corrosion for over 20 years.
 

LCJudge

Subscriber
Age
60
Last Subscription Date
12/14/2019
I use good antifreeze with clean rainwater and have had no problems with corrosion for over 20 years.
Agree Phil. Good anitfreeze and distilled water (or rainwater) will do a pretty good job fighting corrosion.
 

Tracy T

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
Ford had a issue years back with the cylinders rusting thru from the water jacket side and they offered a additive that you mixed in with your antifreeze. the best i recall it didnt take much either. if i can think of the name or lay hands on a can which is more likley I will post back. Thinking the neighbor farmer has a can on the shelf!
 

slip knot

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/27/2019
I was getting some corrosion inhibitor from the AC dealer but they quit carrying it a few years back. Seems the anti-corrosion properties can get depleted from antifreeze and need to be replenished if the AF isn't changed out.

You can get a test kit that measures alkalinity in the coolant and lets you know when it need attention.
 

Power

Registered
I would contact Jim Conte.
He is quite knowledgeable and sells anticorrosion and boiler treatment chemicals.
I have purchased products he recommended
 

M.Canute

Registered
From https://penray.com/cooling-system-techfacts/metal-corrosion/

One major factor on the corrosion rate of the metals is the coolant’s pH. Shifts in coolant pH will affect the metals that corrode and the rate of each metal’s corrosion. The pH scale runs from 0 to 14. A coolant becomes more acidic closer to zero; and more alkaline toward 14. Coolant pH should always be maintained between 8.5 and 11. If a coolant’s pH drops below 8.5, it will become aggressive to ferrous metals (cast iron and steel), aluminum, copper and brass. If it increases above 11, it will become aggressive to aluminum and solder in a cooling system. Maintaining optimum pH in a coolant is a critical function of a quality coolant additive (SCA). It is important to use coolant additive package containing a pH buffer to insure the optimum pH range of the coolant.
The pH of pure water is 7.
 

LCJudge

Subscriber
Age
60
Last Subscription Date
12/14/2019
I know of an old farmer near me that used to put about a 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda in his tractors radiators every spring. I happened to be at his house one morning when he was doing it and he told me he did it every year. I assume it was his way of adjusting the PH in his coolant although I don't know if he understood the chemistry behind it or not. I guess it worked (for him). He operated the same 3 or 4 tractors for 40 years or more.
 

DCamp

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/05/2019
I used to to us some in our big trucks. Don't remember the name of the product but it said on the label to us it every two years.
 

Tracy T

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
sorry it took me so long! new Holland part # FW-15.

contains
potassium hydroxide, phosphoric acid, sillcic acid. have to wait till morning and i need to dig out the magnifying glass!

lets try this again! potassium hydroxide, phosphoric acid, sillcic acid H2SIO3 disodium salt, molybdate MoO4 squared disodium T-4, Nitros acid, potassium salt
 
Last edited:

uglyblue66

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
11/07/2018
I thought that was the job of the water pump lubercant? Which you seldom see or hear of anymore.
 

Duey C

Subscriber
Age
55
Last Subscription Date
12/08/2019
Excuse the bump: And more questions:
A year or two ago over on the model T forum there was a similar question with similar results plus.
What I came away with was for the plain water users like me, adding in a very small amount of coolant for a machine, saw, drill etc would handle the corrosion preventative for us also but I lost track of that thread and never was able to substantiate it/nail that thought down.
Soft water from the short hose here yields some rust over a summer. :(
Hard water from the other hose here would be worse. :(
Thoughts?
Yes, I know. Anti-Freeze would be far better but for the plain water users. There's a lot of 'em out here.
Like a fleet of prairie tractors let's say that an old friend has. Plain water from the hose stretched across the building.
Saw/drill coolant?
 

Tracy T

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
Thoughts? Home made distill out of a pressure cooker and distill what ever water you have on hand??
 
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