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Onan: Any growler experts out there

07wingnut

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
I just picked this up today, and have a very rudimentary ideas on how to use it. However, some detailed information on techniques would sure some in handy. It also has 2 sets of leads, on of which is for testing continuity I think. The other, have no clue. Also, if someone could point me to a user manual source, that would be extremely helpful.
 

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HBSkirmit

EMAIL NOT WORKING Maxine1@tds.net
Age
76

Ben Cowan

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/07/2019
Man it’s been a long time back, taught tractor mechanics in high school fro 82-89. Had a similar unit. I can’t translate the labels. That would be a first start. I’ll look around for any information in my old auto books!
 

Ben Cowan

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/07/2019
Man it’s been a long time back, taught tractor mechanics in high school fro 82-89. Had a similar unit. I can’t translate the labels. That would be a first start. I’ll look around for any information in my old auto books!
 

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Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
06/10/2020
Funny how they would have you test for ground faults between each and every commutator bar and the armature core! All you need to do is test ONE. They’re all connected together. Through TWO paths nonetheless! If there is a single ground fault anywhere, they will ALL have continuity to ground.

Keith
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
06/10/2020
I thought each bar was connected to the one 180 degrees apart, how are they interconnected?
It depends on the number of poles. On a four pole machine they will be approximately 90 degrees apart. But in all cases each commutator segment, or “bar”, is connected to two coils. The start of one, and the end of another, and the full set of coils are thus electrically continuous all the way around.

Here’s a diagram of one connection scheme:
F4311AA5-548D-425C-8EE9-69DC590CD3E6.jpeg

So a ground fault anywhere will show up on all bars, and all bars will show continuity to all other bars, even if one coil is open circuit. In order for a bar to read open circuit to the others, at least two separate open circuit conditions must exist. If it is that bad, it’s likely to be visually apparent as well. :brows:

Keith
 

Engineville

Registered
Consider the information in these two videos.
HOW TO USE AN ARMATURE GROWLER [YouTube: SmallEngineMechanic]
Note washer electrical short test and hacksaw blade oscillation due to induced magnetism.
[Moral: Hacksaw blade doesn’t oscillate => no induced magnetism in armature winding => no short between armature windings. Or, hacksaw blade oscillates => induced magnetism in armature winding => short between armature windings.]
Growler DC Generator Starter Armature Testing [YouTube: Frenchcreekvalley]
Note electrical shorts and temperature along with oscillating hacksaw blade ... info in the comments.
 

07wingnut

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
Thanks to all who replied. I took the bottom off to take a look at the guts. It turns out the probes taped together are for checking for current between the commutator segments, and the high/low is simply a shunt around the meter. This circuit is not connected to any other wiring. The continuity probes are powered by a low voltage 5.8volt winding off of the growler and turn on the light when there is continuity.
 
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