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Anyone Else Build Foundry Patterns

ChrisinEstes

Registered
Last Subscription Date
06/19/2014
I haven't yet... but it's "on the list" I'm slowly gathering up the stuff required to cast my own aluminum. Mostly small stuff, for model engines and such.

I have a CNC router, so I figure that'll come in handy if/when I get to it.

What sort of patterns do you make? Do you do your own casting ? What metals do you use?

Chris
 

J.B. Castagnos

Registered
Last Subscription Date
01/01/2006
I've made patterns for our old marine engines, water pumps, timers and brackets, and some one time items. There's an old pattern maker about twenty miles from me, very friendly and helpful, I learned a lot from him.
 

George Kulisiewicz

Subscriber
Age
41
Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
I have built a few patterns over the past few years and often times impressed myself with what i have created ...not by far a professional but you learn as you go and once the basics are achieved its not terrible...At one time i thought about learning to master the art of wood pattern making but technology changed that...Today a decent 3-d printer and a little know how and you can make just about anything you want. Im sure if not already happening someone somewhere will scan an Otto or some other exotic engine and print it out on a 3-d printer all within the same day and head to the local foundry the next... things that use to take elaborate setups and hours upon hours of labor will be addressed in a matter of minutes...this can be a plus but it can also have its drawbacks.. I often wonder what that will do to the engine hobby as well as others?:shrug:
 

Ronald E. McClellan

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
I've made several patterns for things that I needed to complete and get things working. 1. steam engine with fancy base. Top to a gas engine hopper. Two parts broken put together then cast. 2. bearing block , the inside and outside of a small rare muffler. 3. Two machine parts. I made the patterns then cast these using epoxy. Ron
 

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Rob Charles

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
04/05/2017
I have made patterns over the years. Several pistons, intake parts for a 25 hp White and Middleton, set to build a 3hp Backus, I have made old parts into patterns more than making new wooden ones. Rob
 

TekNik

Registered
I have been working on making some patterns for a 1900's motor-bicycle engine using 3d printing.
It is a lot of fun, but it probably takes almost as long as a skilled patternmaker making it out of wood.

It took me 10+ hours to do the 3d modeling,
And over 24 hours of printer runtime for both halves total.
I still have lots of finishing to do to get the patterns ready for sand.
For me, and for the complexity of the parts, 3d printing saves some time.

I still need to make the crankcase patterns and the flywheel patterns.

TekNik
 

George Kulisiewicz

Subscriber
Age
41
Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
TekNik,
I would be interested in learning more about your project as I to have been planning on doing a single cylinder motorcycle engine of my own design to replicate something produced during the turn of the century.. I would love to see your progress.
 

old iron shops

Registered
mostly its reproduction parts fro vintage machinery but any thing that i need to make i suppose i don't do the molding and poring part but i work with a friend that casts aluminum and there are a few iron foundries that i also work with

---------- Post added at 09:40:55 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:37:11 AM ----------

yes i've found the old boys are more then happy to teach you i try to sponge up all i can frome them.

---------- Post added at 09:45:30 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:40:55 AM ----------

lol ya its not a fast process but doing a good job one time it the goal then you can make as many as you need.
 

Junkologist

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/28/2019
I am currently trying to reproduce a cast iron tool box lid, which would be easy if I could remove it, but it’s riveted and I don’t want to disturb the rivets, so I planned on 3D scanning it and then printing out a duplicate. Fortunately, I don’t live far from Case Western Reserve University. They have a place there called Thinkbox. It’s 50,000 square feet of space dedicated to inventing and prototyping tech and is available to the general public. The largest place of its kind in the world. A really cool place. I was able to get the scan done on my first visit, but I’ve changed my mind about the 3D printing because of the time involved. I think I’ll just carve a duplicate lid out of wood or some other material with a CNC router machine. I imagine it would take a lot less time and I would also avoid the material costs of 3D printing. Fun stuff!
 

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Edgar

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/18/2019
well out of need and to learn and because of high prices for original parts vs rpop ..i said to myself why not just give it a try...so hereare a few patterns ive done....push rods for a tom thumb and 1 hp famous...muffler for same enginges...ignitor for 4hp and 6hp famous fuel pump linkage for 6hp famous ..now just got to send out to a foundry somewhere..edgar in west tn:) ps alos forgot core boxes made also for push rod ramps that will fit on 4hp and up on bigger famous engines and 1hp famous ignitor trip ramp.
 

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tharper

Registered
Here are a couple I finished just a few month ago.

The first is a set for a magneto coupling designed by A.F. Milbrath and used
on early Wisconsin water cooled engines. The 3D rendering shows the complete assembly.

The second set are the valve shrouds for a Wisconsin 4 cylinder Model "A"
T-head as used in WW1 era FWD trucks and early Stutz automobiles.

The last photo is a 3D printed mock-up we made of the magneto coupling.

Best regards,

Terry
 

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P Stier

Registered
Here are a couple I finished just a few month ago.

The first is a set for a magneto coupling designed by A.F. Milbrath and used
on early Wisconsin water cooled engines. The 3D rendering shows the complete assembly.

The second set are the valve shrouds for a Wisconsin 4 cylinder Model "A"
T-head as used in WW1 era FWD trucks and early Stutz automobiles.

The last photo is a 3D printed mock-up we made of the magneto coupling.

Best regards,

Terry
Terry,How have the valve shrouds turned out? Are there going to be extra made?I need a set for my 1918 FWD. Phil Stier
 

tharper

Registered
Hello Phil,

They came out great! I will check with my foundry guy - he still has the patterns & core boxes so I think it won't be a problem to run another set.

Best regards,

Terry
 

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