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Berg Hi-Way Surfacer

jgrimes

Registered
looking for any links or info for this Berg Hi-Way Surfacer. Done a normal on-line search and found nothing It has a Wisconsin engine so I thought I would start here. I would like to restore it and take it to the shows
 

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K-Tron

Registered
Very nice find. I have actually been looking for one of these very hard over the last few years without success. I am pretty sure that the engine on your machine has been replaced. The Wisconsin AGND engine at 12.5hp is far newer than the Berg concrete grinder that it is sitting on. Mike S. in Avon Ohio, aka Junkologist has one from the 1930s with a 1-1/2hp Briggs & Stratton model Q. I have a picture of one of these with what I believe to be a Wisconsin A4 or A5 engine. Best I can tell not a single one of these 1930s Wisconsin engines is known to exist. The Wisconsin AGND on your machine was first released in 1957. I would assume that Berg had either went out of business, or was bought up by then. Your find gives me hope that more of them are out there. I would love to find one with the correct original Wisconsin engine.

1931 AD BERG CONCRETE AND ASPHALT SURFACERS, INDUSTRIAL ENGINES & POWER UNITS 1.jpg

Chris
 

Wayne 440

Registered
Sales fell off quickly in the 30's. Here is an excerpt from a Congressional hearing record, with sales figures for the machine.

berg.png
 
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jgrimes

Registered
Very nice find. I have actually been looking for one of these very hard over the last few years without success. I am pretty sure that the engine on your machine has been replaced. The Wisconsin AGND engine at 12.5hp is far newer than the Berg concrete grinder that it is sitting on. Mike S. in Avon Ohio, aka Junkologist has one from the 1930s with a 1-1/2hp Briggs & Stratton model Q. I have a picture of one of these with what I believe to be a Wisconsin A4 or A5 engine. Best I can tell not a single one of these 1930s Wisconsin engines is known to exist. The Wisconsin AGND on your machine was first released in 1957. I would assume that Berg had either went out of business, or was bought up by then. Your find gives me hope that more of them are out there. I would love to find one with the correct original Wisconsin engine.

View attachment 375534

Chris
very interesting love the old picture thank you
 

K-Tron

Registered
Wayne, thank you for that upload. Just 186 units built! No wonder I have not been able to find one. Here it is 90 years later, there may not be more than three or four left. I hope Mike chimes in, as I am sure he knows something more about these. I wouldnt be surprised if jgrimes machine started out life with a Briggs & Stratton engine. Removing the engine and measuing old bolt holes for engine mounting will help tell the story.

Chris
 

I like oldstuff

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/09/2015
And today we use those Wirtgen machines that do it 5 feet wide. Sounds like once the word got out about the Berg machines the sales dwindled.
 

Zira

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/24/2019
They might have made those surfacers for a lot of years, with various engines. Or as you point out, it could have been a replacement.

"Historical Note: The Concrete Surfacing Machinery Company was headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio. It became Stewart Industries when W. Roderick Stewart acquired the company in 1963. Their products are documented in an Edward R. Bacon Company dealer catalog, collection 2331. Another dealer catalog, published for Central Supply & Equipment Company (Collection 3290) cites the Concrete Surfacing Machinery name for the Berg/Stewart product line in pages dated 1966."
 

jgrimes

Registered
Wayne, thank you for that upload. Just 186 units built! No wonder I have not been able to find one. Here it is 90 years later, there may not be more than three or four left. I hope Mike chimes in, as I am sure he knows something more about these. I wouldnt be surprised if jgrimes machine started out life with a Briggs & Stratton engine. Removing the engine and measuing old bolt holes for engine mounting will help tell the story.

Chris
I looked under the engine tonight and there were no other bolt holes and it didn't look like it had ever been modified.
 

K-Tron

Registered
The oil pan mounting holes for the AF, AFH, AG, AGH, AH, AHH and AGND are all 6-3/4" x 13-1/2". I do not have a model Q Briggs & Stratton, so I cannot measure what the bolt pattern is for it. I am fairly certain that it would be smaller. There really is no way to know what your machine had for an engine. Even an AF at 5.4hp would be more than adequate for the size of cutter used on that machine. A model Q is just 1-1/2hp at full tilt, and from what I have seen, these appear to have a 1:1 right angle drive for the scarifier. What is the spec number on your AGND? If it has six digits it can be searched on microfiche to see what it was actually built for. I would be awfully surprised if this was the original engine. I have seen engines half the size run three larger scarifier heads with ease.

Chris
 

jgrimes

Registered
The oil pan mounting holes for the AF, AFH, AG, AGH, AH, AHH and AGND are all 6-3/4" x 13-1/2". I do not have a model Q Briggs & Stratton, so I cannot measure what the bolt pattern is for it. I am fairly certain that it would be smaller. There really is no way to know what your machine had for an engine. Even an AF at 5.4hp would be more than adequate for the size of cutter used on that machine. A model Q is just 1-1/2hp at full tilt, and from what I have seen, these appear to have a 1:1 right angle drive for the scarifier. What is the spec number on your AGND? If it has six digits it can be searched on microfiche to see what it was actually built for. I would be awfully surprised if this was the original engine. I have seen engines half the size run three larger scarifier heads with ease.

Chris
the spec number is 187191
 

gdstew

Registered
"What is the spec number on your AGND? If it has six digits it can be searched on microfiche to see what it was actually built for."

Was that a hint Chris??????


That spec number was first released on August 31, 1960 to the Concrete Surfacing Machinery Co. It had a special governor control assy and the engine also included a spark plug wrench. ( never knew Wisconsin had it's own wrench )
 

K-Tron

Registered
Gary, I was not trying to give you more work, however I am glad that you looked it up! That sure is an interesting spec number. I never would have guessed that that new of an engine would actually be original to a machine which has literally been unchanged since the early 1930s. They could have spec'ed out an ABN and had three times the power of the Briggs model Q, let alone a behemoth AGND.

Chris
 

jgrimes

Registered
"What is the spec number on your AGND? If it has six digits it can be searched on microfiche to see what it was actually built for."

Was that a hint Chris??????


That spec number was first released on August 31, 1960 to the Concrete Surfacing Machinery Co. It had a special governor control assy and the engine also included a spark plug wrench. ( never knew Wisconsin had it's own wrench )
Wow that's cool thank you for taking the time to look it up
 

jgrimes

Registered
They might have made those surfacers for a lot of years, with various engines. Or as you point out, it could have been a replacement.

"Historical Note: The Concrete Surfacing Machinery Company was headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio. It became Stewart Industries when W. Roderick Stewart acquired the company in 1963. Their products are documented in an Edward R. Bacon Company dealer catalog, collection 2331. Another dealer catalog, published for Central Supply & Equipment Company (Collection 3290) cites the Concrete Surfacing Machinery name for the Berg/Stewart product line in pages dated 1966."
Is there a way to see a copy of this catalog? I found some mentions of it on line but could not find out how to view it. It would be great to find a color photo so I could see how they were painted.
 

Zira

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/24/2019
You could contact the Historical Construction Equipment Association, they have a 1959 copy. Or maybe Erbco, they are still in business.
 

jgrimes

Registered
You could contact the Historical Construction Equipment Association, they have a 1959 copy. Or maybe Erbco, they are still in business.
The Historical Construction Equipment Association is only about 45 min away for me I will check it out thank you
 
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