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Big Motor in a Bad Spot

AngrySailor

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/31/2020
So this blew up today... it’s one of the unloading conveyor motors. It’s as far down in the bowels of the ship as you can get, has to be lifted over the other motor, around the end of the port conveyor then up three decks. Best guess is it weighs at least 1500 lbs:uhoh: oh, all the nuts and bolts are rusted bad and we have a load of grain on so no hot work:mad:
 

Attachments

Elden DuRand

In Memory Of
Age
78
Last Subscription Date
12/22/2017
Re: Big motor in a bad spot

Angry:

It's good you are a young guy. Us Old Farts would probably vapor lock doing that.

Have fun!:)
 

Phil P

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/24/2013
Re: Big motor in a bad spot

Hi

I disassembled a diesel on a DC generator to get it out of the ship.

Then rebuilt the diesel test ran it for a number of hours dissembled it again put it back in the ship and reassembled it.

Still running 30 years later. LOL

I would use an air hammer with brass tooling to disassemble that unit in to pieces light enough to be manageable.

Then do the same with the repaired or replacement unit.

Phil P
 

Power

Registered
Re: Big motor in a bad spot

Looks like maintenance may have been a tad light. While you are at it, I would have someone pop the cover on the gear reduction unit, and see how it is doing. Clean and change oil at least. so you guys are not back in there for a while.
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Too much moisture way down there ruin the windings? Do those motors have heaters to keep them warm when they're not running?
 

AngrySailor

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/31/2020
It’s in and running as of 8 this morning! I just about did “vapour lock”:D The entire crew helped out so it went as good as it could have. The motor shafts were different size (of course) one guy knew just where to look and pulled out a spare coupling half that fit. We wet the area down and lots of chiseling and hammering later the rusty nuts all came off or apart. There are winding heaters and the motors are sealed, the open look is a cooling jacket between the outer case and the winding case. It was a moisture issue for sure though. I meggered it out at .27M:uhoh: The gearbox oil is changed regularly, this motor has
It’s brushes and bearings serviced also but it had been there for at least 30 years. Now the boys have to get the old one back on deck to send for repair. At least we’re unloaded and on the run again.
 

Newoldstock

Registered
Re: Big motor in a bad spot

Looks like maintenance may have been a tad light. While you are at it, I would have someone pop the cover on the gear reduction unit, and see how it is doing. Clean and change oil at least. so you guys are not back in there for a while.
Dirt is a natural part of moving bulk products like this.
The slip rings tell me a different story.
Clean and shinny, someone has been doing PMs on it ( or it failed very early )

Where I work we get PMs then we are told we can not shut it down and we will not be allowed to stone rings or anything else.

They get dirty ugly messed up until they fail.
Angry Sailors workplace looks well cared for by my eye. ( notice all the lights work )
 

Motorhead

Subscriber
Age
67
Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
Grain dust and any spark is a disastrous recipe! Friend of mine has an OLD feed and grain mill that his Dad built in the early 40's. I have seen some things in there that made me cringe from a maintenance standpoint like OPEN magnetic switches for motors.
 
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AngrySailor

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/31/2020
Open contractors :eek:

Ok so next pressing emergency... one of the engine driven cooling water pumps bolts were vibrating out when I came down just now but that’s nothing compared to our current predicament... WE ARE OUT OF COFFEE:mad:
 

s100

Registered
Don't know how it is today but back when I was in 'em "PM" in the auto plants meant "Post Mortem". Their attitude was run it till it melts and hope that it melts on somebody else's shift so they get the blame.
 

AngrySailor

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/31/2020
Hey S100, you’re in the D-ROC. We just sailed past there an hour ago. Why didn’t you send coffee:rant: Most ships I’ve worked on the guys are pretty good about keeping things up. Most likely they’ll be the ones who have to fix it... the unloading gear requires quite a bit of maintenance. There’s usually two conveyors over 600’ long, an elevator or loop belt and the unloading boom. Rollers and roller frames constantly need replacing. It’s a pretty rough environment for equipment. Most of these self unloaders can offload 3-6000 metric tons per hour so we’re not running things gently!
 

Newoldstock

Registered
Open contractors :eek:
The most magical place I ever worked was a steel mill with some of the oldest stuff you ever saw.
Huge switchrooms full of big sheets of Phenolic and open switches, contactors and devices of every kind... and nothing made after 1958.

It was the happiest time of my working life.
All made sense, all was simple and clear to see, all this equipment told when it was not working right and would call out to you to come to this or that area by a funny noise.

Dangerous, dam right, you better not walk around unless you aware of what your doing, but I could watch it all happen and hear it see it and know when sequence of events was wrong and need my attention.

I wish I could go back.
In my work shop are a pair of little CCL 33amp 600 volt contactors. ( CCL Canadian controller Ltd later owned by Silvania that ruined the company and now Eaton and I am not sure they make anything in the old plant, but I can see some family resemblance in sub assemblies of modern parts )
The kind of things that have the manual controls built right onto the contactor block so you can manual push them to turn on or off or reset...
Sometimes I work in my shop and look at those and wonder what I will use them for.
I will put them in something one of these days, maybe an auto transfer switch and it will be a glorious!
And there won't be any guards or doors or obstructions in the way.
Only I will be allowed in there too!

Its like they never existed now.
Here is the only picture google has of a CCL starter. ( and its not much one at that )
No defeater in the door, and that little cast handle is not spring loaded, it just opens and closes a simple knife switch inside.
This one is in the crumbling Inco iron ore plant that being torn down.
I never worked on anything as tough and reliable as CCL parts ( I think because they were made for 25 cycle and were WAY overbuilt for 60hz aplications )
http://www.invisiblethreads.com/files/derivatives/photo/200508/25874-2005-ore-swi_08.jpg
 

AngrySailor

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/31/2020
I’ll snap a pic of the motor control for this when I get forward next time. It’s not quite that old but it’s pretty cool. Big contractors, 4 or 5? stages of timers for starting and a room full of resistor banks! Now it would be a boring plastic box that cost about a gorillion $$$ and can barely keep the smoke in!
 

Elden DuRand

In Memory Of
Age
78
Last Subscription Date
12/22/2017
Open contractors :eek:

Ok so next pressing emergency... one of the engine driven cooling water pumps bolts were vibrating out when I came down just now but that’s nothing compared to our current predicament... WE ARE OUT OF COFFEE:mad:
Oh NOOOOOOOooooooo!:eek:

Better call in a coffee copter rescue before the riots start.

...........Or everybody goes to sleep.
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
How do you run out of coffee? What kind of operation are they running?? What do they do in that case? Air drop it on the deck from a helicopter?? :D
 
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AngrySailor

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/31/2020
NOS, one of the last ships I worked on the entire switchboard and MCC’s were all CCL. Easy to work on because we never had too!

Edit: anyone up near Port Huron or Sarnia? Drop us some dunking donuts or tims off the blue water bridge! I’m sure homeland security would thinks it’s cocaine but screw then if they can’t take a joke!

Edit: Vanman, it apparently was ordered but the delivery driver forgot to load it at the warehouse:bonk: he will NEVER live this one down!
 

AngrySailor

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/31/2020
The brushes and slip rings are sealed when the end cap is installed. Everything in the cargo area as far as switches go is explosion proof or sealed, there are standard fluorescent lights though and the emergency fire pump which is a brushless TEFC not explosion rated:uhoh: for grain and coal cargoes there is strict no smoking policies and obviously no hot work.

Edit: I would guess that a hot conveyor roller bearing would be one of the most dangerous issues down there...

Edit edit: the fluorescent lights are in (plastic) sealed enclosures, not my department so I never really payed much attention to them! Still not explosion rated but not open.
 
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