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Boynton Shaper Belted

Joel Sanderson

Registered
This is a little Boynton shaper I got late last year. I just finished mounting the countershaft, the levers and belting it today. This was made some time in the 1870's, before Boynton and Plummer joined in 1880. It has a 7" stroke. The table does not have any movement--it's lifted by hand and locked in place--and instead of the table and work moving beneath the cutter, the head moves across the work. I have to order the right size HSS for it, but when I do I'll take a video of it running. Should be neat. I'll post a link here where I get that far, but in the mean time, hopefully someone will find this interesting. I just love the curved castings they did in 1870's. The horizontal Kempsmith mill behind it on the left is from the late 70's, and the planer behind it and on the right is from '69 or '70. All three are curvy.

I'll use this little shaper for the first cut on dies after they've been forged, to get beneath the fire scale. My other shaper, which is a 24" Smith and Mills geared shaper (belt shifter) is just too slow and cumbersome for short cuts like that.

Joel
 

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Duey C

Subscriber
Age
55
Last Subscription Date
12/08/2019
Super cute little shaper!
I'll guess the lever actuate the clutch on the counter shaft.
Very cool.
 

Joel Sanderson

Registered
I'll guess the lever actuate the clutch on the counter shaft.
Yeah. It's a very practical on-off switch. This is one of two common line shaft clutch designs. (The other is the belt shifter with a lose pulley and a tight pulley, where the belt is shifted from one pulley to the other.) The hand lever pushes a rod with a fork on it that moves a cone which spreads two arms that open a thick iron band outward to grip the inside of the pulley. Sometimes there's a separate drum inside the pulley instead of opening agains it directly. The band and the pulley it opens into are both cast iron without any lining. Theoretically they only contact when the band is spread, but that's only when the bearing (inside the pulley) has no wear. It's always a little oily, and since cast iron is porous and holds the oil, this type of clutch lasts a very long time. I've never worn one out or seen one that cannot be used because of wear. Sometimes I need to squirt some oil on one if it starts to sound dry but not very often.

There are less common clutch designs too. Some I've seen have bands that grip inwards around a cylinder instead of opening outwards, but they're not as common or as strong. I have a few of those in the shop too. They're more tricky to adjust.
 

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Target Driller

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/15/2019
That's a sweet old Shaper machine. Old time vintage machinery really catches my attention. Old time days gone by.
Glad you have given it a new life and purpose.
 

Joel Sanderson

Registered
That's a sweet old Shaper machine. Old time vintage machinery really catches my attention. Old time days gone by.
Glad you have given it a new life and purpose.
Not gone by if you surround yourself with old stuff. To quote the late Utah Phillips, "If I go outside and pick up the oldest rock there is and drop it on your foot, the past didn't go anywhere, did it?" It still matters to you, right now.
 

Duey C

Subscriber
Age
55
Last Subscription Date
12/08/2019
Thank you Joel! You did a great job of explaining that clutch but you freely give the detail shots I craved/needed! Thanks.
Yet, there was that "throw out bearing" if you will, hiding in plain sight in Boyntoncountershaft-jpeg.377230, just to the left of the pulley (clutch) with the crossed belt.
We have a near 3 foot, external 6 shoe clutch at the showgrounds that we've had since 92 that apparently is staring at ME to put back together. Been on this mind for a long time. It MAY also have 6 internal shoes...
On another note: I wonder if our guy oils/greases the loose pulley on a tight/loose pulley arrangement we have there... :unsure:
Thank you so much. It's much appreciated!
You inspire on many levels. I think you "get that" but you've never done so in an arrogant way like a few folks might.
That is appreciated even more. :)
 

Joel Sanderson

Registered
Here's a video I took yesterday of the Boynton making its first cut. This is a piece of hot rolled A-36, and I was cutting just deeper than the scale. It did pretty well considering I really haven't tightened it up yet. I'm sure I'll get it to do better as I get used to the machine.


Here's a picture of the cut it made so you can see it better than in the video.

Here's a view of its legs too. As I was pinning it to the floor yesterday I was thinking about the earlier machines' curved legs vs. the later solid standards. The curved legs of the early machines were harder to cast, of course, but their advantage is that they set evenly on uneven floors. I don't know how long I've spent with some other machines trying to get them to quit wobbling, because there's no flex. It makes them more rigid on a flat floor, but they're not much help on mine. This shaper hangs on with its fingers.
 

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MSchreiber

Subscriber
"E. N. Boynton Man. Worcester Mass." Post Drill I have on original board, last patent date NOV 5 1878

Flywheel removed for pic.


Flywheel machined for a round belt? Original or not?


2 speed crank locations.


Patent date
 
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