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Briggs & Stratton model 14

Curtis Loew

Registered
I bought this used and have been splitting wood with it for 18 years I put a new rod and piston and rings in it years ago Cleaned it up and painted it put the right gas tank on it all I ever had to do it. Starts with two pulls never touched the carb really. Well we were splitting wood with us recently certainly the RPMs went through the roof I quickly shut it off started it up again and same thing no governor control it seems. I can run it if I hold the butterfly and place. I was told the governor Gere may be broken but I am not familiar with this at all. I figured somewhere inside the crank case there’s a problem with the governor. If anyone has some helpful knowledgeable advice I would much appreciate it! Thank you!
 

John Newman Jr.

Subscriber
Age
64
Last Subscription Date
12/23/2019
First thing to check is that the governor arm is clocked correctly on the shaft. Loosen the screw that clamps the arm to the shaft. Hold the arm at full open throttle position. With a pair of pliers, rotate the shaft in the same direction as the arm to get the full throttle position. While all of this is held securely, tighten the arm clamp screw down.
If it still wants to run away, you have internal issues. Could be a broken gear.
 

K-Tron

Registered
Welcome to smokstak. The governor gear on the model 14 is steel. One of the governor flyweights might have finally broke free causing the engine to run the way it is. Pulling the oil pan will tell for sure. The governor is driven off the bottom of the camshaft gear. The only other thing that I can think of is that the governor arm on the outside of the engine might be holding stationary as the shaft running through the block turns. Usually they are so well rusted together that does not happen, but you never know.

Chris
 
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