Buckeye Throttle information

Odin

Subscriber
I've seen a few engines with them, and have had lots of fun running a Frick equipped with the type. But I was wondering during the last show what is actually inside such a unit. I'm assuming a balanced pressure valve, the tailrod making me think a gate valve variation.

Does anyone have diagrams or disassembled pictures of a 2 1/2" or similar Buckeye throttle so I can see how it works? The Frick seems to respond well with it, but it tends to get stiff when opening it near the boiler's popoff pressure.
 

JBoogie

Active member
Here ya be....

The body has 2 tapered seats and there are 2 loose discs that are captive in a yoke which is attached to the stem(s).

It's a pretty simple device that I've heard people badmouth. Buckeye sold tons and tons of them so they must not have been too bad. Just like any other mechanism when they work they work when they don't they don't.....
 

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GreasyIron

Subscriber
Interesting; looks much like what Minneapolis used on locomotive style boilers. I wonder whether Minneapolis copied Buckeye or was buying from them.

They had another tab underneath the main body for a "knee action" arm, but I suspect Buckeye would have gladly offered that even if it wasn't in their standard line-up.
 

Odin

Subscriber
Oh that is neat. So it is like a gate valve in design, but arranged such that the steam could flow all around the sides of the gate so it doesn't get unbalanced force and blow open, and the gate itself could pivot slightly within its guide rod so that it would always be flush to the seats no matter how it wore.

That also explains why it wants to stick at higher pressures. When fully shut the entire throttle cavity is pressurized, holding the outlet disc tight to its seat. And it takes a bit of steam flow for it to loosen up again, leading to the feeling of it sticking. Cause the minute there's steam pressure on both sides, it opens easy again.

Alas on a Frick, the engine has already gotten a hundred RPM on by that point when I just wanted it to turn slowly so I can back into the belt. More often than not I end up tightening the belts by bumping the clutch instead, easier to control that way as long as you have it lined up enough that it doesn't fall off when the engine revvs.
 

GreasyIron

Subscriber
Interesting; looks much like what Minneapolis used on locomotive style boilers. I wonder whether Minneapolis copied Buckeye.....
Sure looks like a MTM number on the main casting. But they sure copied it close; right down to the floating contact surfaces.
 
Advance used an almost identical throttle, but theirs had a packing nut which allowed for expansion. They tend to work much better than the MTM valves.
 
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