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Building a Lombard Steam Log Hauler

tharper

Registered
I thought I would take a moment to bring you folks up to date on an amazing project. It seems that another steam Lombard log hauler is well on its way to steaming back to life in the near future.

This past year Paul Breton has been making good progress turning a heap of rusty parts collected over the last 30 years into a working steam log hauler.

Currently he has over 90% of the parts he needs to finish the frame and running gear and has made good progress putting it all together. This isn't as easy as it sounds. Paul figures that he has parts from at least five different Lombards. Like many low volume manufactures, Lombard tended to make running changes as they went along. Add to that field repairs and backwoods blacksmith repairs and no two machines are exactly alike. Then there is the reality that most parts that were discarded were broken or worn out.

To add to all this Paul has had to recover parts from remote locations all over northern Maine. Many of these machines were cut-up on site and left to rot. One machine - No. 25 which was sold new to the St. John Lumber Company in 1906 was taken completely apart to the last nut and bolt. Paul had to spend days digging around in the mud to recover all that he could.


Here are some links to videos:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sHl1hI0VkQ4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gh1UqTeXSwg&t=268s

Best regards,

Terry
 

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tharper

Registered
Unfortunately I don't have anymore photos at the moment. He's actually working in
a two car garage so getting good photos isn't easy!

In regards to the boiler. He has two original boilers - one is a lap seam the other is the later butt joint version. Both were made by Ames Iron Works. They are surprisingly in good condition and have undergone ultrasound testing. The lap seam will most likely be just for display. The butt seam boiler needs tubes and I believe a couple of small areas that need to be pad welded.

If you would like to see one of these beast up and running we will have the Maine Forest & Logging Museum's steam Lombard operating as well as a 10 ton gasoline Lombard during Living History Days on October 6 & 7 in Bradley Maine.

Best regards,

Terry
 

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George Hoffman

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
04/28/2018
Terry, That is a great project Paul has going there. The hunting and gathering is half the fun. Keep us posted.
Cheers George .
 

FWurth

One Millionth Post
Last Subscription Date
07/29/2019
What became of the one parked up in Alaska in a remote area? It was pictured some where on one of these Lombard sites a few years back. Also something I've noticed over the years, why is it that when sawmillers get done with equipment, it always seems to get destroyed? We had relatives here that also had a sawmill operation, not one piece of equipment was remotely complete or recognizable when they quit. I even tried to purchase a leftover TD 9, no dice. The old boy simply refused and then junked it for a few dollars for scrap. :shrug:
 

tharper

Registered
Not sure why they do that! The remains of the No. 25 Lombard were as I said earlier torn completely apart. Even valves were taken apart with the handles removed and the guts taken out. Then simply left other than the boiler which had disappeared.

Other machines were scrapped during the war - others to provide parts to
keep running machines going. At least one operation up here used steam Lombards well into the 1940's. Not bad considering the last one was made in 1917.

The Alaska machine is a Phoenix made under license by the Phoenix Manufacturing Co. of Wisconsin. Phoenix having purchased the rights from
Lombard. I believe its still sitting up there.
 

Marv in Minn

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/05/2020
Alaska Phoenix pic

the old lumberjack blacksmith/mechanics would use any abandoned parts they could find
to build or repair their equipment. the complete machines were disassembled to make it harder
for competing camps to keep going.
 

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OddDuck

Registered
Holy cow! I didn't realize Paul was that far along, I thought he was just in the "gathering parts" stage. Very cool!
 

OddDuck

Registered
Less than 10. Lessee, the Maine Forest and Logging Museum has 2, #38 and #64, Clark's Trading Post in New Hampshire has #70, #39 is in Ashland, Me, and the Patten Lumberman's museum has one (no number plate). The rest are all partial or parts of machines. Terry, correct me if I've missed any. As for functioning machines (or at least capable of being run) there are only 3, and the only one in more or less current use is #38. #64 and #70 are complete, but for various and assorted reasons they haven't been steamed up for a while.
 

tharper

Registered
You are correct Peter,

#64 The Owl's Head Lombard (Crooker Family) was moved to the Maine Forest & Logging Museum several years ago. Its fully functional but lacks a boiler inspection and any work that may entail.

The only other pile of parts that could be considered a "Lombard" is the Cunliff Depot machine in the Allagash which is essentially a stripped boiler and frame.

The Patten Logging Museum Lombard is No. 82 which we believe is the 2nd to last steamer built.

No. 39 in Ashland is interesting: Its one of the few Lombards that still has its
original No. Plate. It was originally built for the Eastern Manufacturing Co. in December of 1907. At the time they purchased two machines and we are pretty sure that the Maine Forest & Logging museum's Lombard (No. #38) is its companion based on the boiler S/N. Eastern operated a third machine that was purchased from Mark T. Claflin - a logging equipment dealer in
Waterville, Me. We have no idea what number this machine would be or
where it ended up.

No. 39 was abandoned at Chamberlain Lake in 1913. In 1918-19 John Morrison - a Jobber for the St. John Lumber Company, hacked a 25 mile road into the site to salvage three of the Eastern Manufacturing machines - it cost him $24,500.00 to get them.

Morrison used them until his Upper St. John River operations were taken over by Ed Lacroix in the early 20's. Two of the Lombards were left at Knowle's Brook following the close of the 1924-25 hauling season and recovered in the 1970's (No. 38 & No. 70). In 1928 Lacroix sold No. 39 to Philias Roy - one of his Jobber's. It eventually found its way to Clayton Lake and was eventually donated to the Ashland Museum.
 

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OddDuck

Registered
Thanks for clarifications, Terry. I didn't know the one in Patten had a number. I didn't see that info during the afternoon I spent at the museum in their reading room.
I'll have to get a pic of the number plate on #64, I'm pretty sure that's an original as well, it didn't get removed because it got broken in place around the central boss and welded back together.
 

Jeff Blaney

Subscriber
Age
32
Last Subscription Date
01/25/2020
That is a great story about John Morrison salvaging the three Lombards. $24,500 sounds like an awful lot of money in 1918-19. Then again, if production ended in 1917, the units still would have been relatively new and other options may
have been limited.

Do we know what a brand new Lombard sold for?
 

Ben Popadak

Registered
Talked with Paul Breton today and asked him about the boilers. He wrote:

Yeah.. I haven’t decide which boiler to use yet. #32 is a lap seam design-can’t be licensed. #83 is a butt seam design- last one that was made. Probably 8-10 years difference in their manufacturing date. It all depends if I want to be historically accurate or have a machine that can be run at a public event.

Might also mention I’m looking for two C-17-1/2 Hancock inspirators (boiler injectors) or a Metropolitan ¾” injector (I have one of those).
 

tharper

Registered
That is a great story about John Morrison salvaging the three Lombards. $24,500 sounds like an awful lot of money in 1918-19. Then again, if production ended in 1917, the units still would have been relatively new and other options may
have been limited.

Do we know what a brand new Lombard sold for?
Hello Jeff,

Around $5,000.00 FOB Interestingly those Lombards salvaged by Morrison dated back to 1907! They already had four years of hard use and than being
abandoned for another five years. Since two ran until 1925 and the third was still going in 1928 I would say that's a lot of value for the dollar!

Lombard also produced gasoline powered machines as well which, for many years, were manufactured alongside of the steamers. In 1919 Morrison could
have bought a brand new 10 ton Gasoline Lombard compete with a massive 6 cylinder Sterling Model "F" T-head engine for about the same money.
However, a number of operations preferred steam - they could haul more and were fairly cheap to maintain though they required a three man crew
which offset that a bit. Burning wood they avoided the cost of toting gasoline into the remote camps.

---------- Post added at 09:39:50 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:17:58 PM ----------

Thanks for clarifications, Terry. I didn't know the one in Patten had a number. I didn't see that info during the afternoon I spent at the museum in their reading room.
I'll have to get a pic of the number plate on #64, I'm pretty sure that's an original as well, it didn't get removed because it got broken in place around the central boss and welded back together.
Hi Peter,

It does get confusing! The Clark machine they have as No. 70 but... they are pretty sure its No. 64. The Crooker Machine is No. 74.

Do you know where the No. 64 plate came from? Do you have photos of it?
Our thought is that the Clark Machine was purchased by Eastern Manufacturing from Mark T. Claflin. However since they had three machines operating by the close of 1913 (two at Russell Brook and one at Woodman Brook) and since our records only go into 1908 and up No. 48 it is possible it could be No. 64.

Way back when they restored it they got the No. 70 plate from Bert Packard but no one knows where or who he got it from!

Thankfully Paul found a plate at the Beau Lake site for No. 25 which was originally sold to the St. John Lumber Company in Nov. 1906. In 1925 it was sold to Lacroix as part of his purchase of the St. John Lumber Company property than scrapped on site at some point.
 

tharper

Registered
Peter,

One of these days I will have to get you cast me one of the plates!

T.

Attached is a photo of the No. 39 - the Ashland Museum machine (aka ex-Philias Roy, ex-Lacroix, Ex-Morrison, ex-Eastern Manufacturing) This photo was taken by a Mrs. M. Prevotah in 1928, she spent quite a bit of time photographing Lacroix's Allagash operations. At that time the machine had just been acquired by Philias Roy.

Roy and his son's comprised a company with the memorable name of Roy, Roy & Roy and worked as jobbers for Lacroix's Madawaska Co. They were a pain to deal with because at times (when it benefited them) they worked as one company or as three separate companies. Thus when Lacroix would submit an invoice for supplies or equipment each Roy would claim it was the others.

Also attached is a list of Lombard parts sold to Roy, Roy & Roy at the time they purchased the steamer from Lacroix. Hmmm.... two 1-3/4"x107" boiler tubes for $7.00 ....

There is another list of steam Lombard parts that Lacroix had shipped back to the factory to go as credit towards purchasing parts for gasoline Lombards. At that time he
was operating a fleet of fifteen or more gasoline Lombards out of Clayton Lake and Churchill Lakes

Pretty cool that this machine is still with us today.
 

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George Hoffman

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
04/28/2018
Terry , Is the log hauler that is at Cedar Valley in Osage Iowa a Lombard or a Phoenix. It is operational each year at their show.
Cheers.
 
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