Check This Ham Shack...

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Kind of surprised my dad did not do something like that:D. He probably had enough radios at one point, he just opted to put one or more in every room of the house, and at least 2 in every vehicle:brows:
 

Harry

Administrator
Staff member
Too neat, too tied down. Stuff needs maintenance and modifications and access to get to it easily. If it simply sits there pretty, it most likely isn't used much.
 

Wayne 440

Active member
Too neat, too tied down. Stuff needs maintenance and modifications and access to get to it easily...
+1. Unless there is a walkway that allows access to the cabling for all that stuff, it is a headache to work on in the making. But there is some nice stuff there, and likely cubic yards of money spent.
 
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That is just one room of several rooms that contain his collection. I believe his home page on www.qrz.com has over 40 photos of his collection. His XYL is a saint.

Bob
WB8NQW
 

Thaumaturge

In Memory Of
(
That is just one room of several rooms that contain his collection. I believe his home page on www.qrz.com has over 40 photos of his collection. His XYL is a saint.

Bob
WB8NQW
(Have to feed in his call sign to find his home page.)
Looked through entire collection. Only recognized about 5 items, 3 being Collins "S" line (which my high school had a set of), the Gates broadcast console (because I replaced one at a radio station I worked at) and a black faced no name AM sig gen (because my first mentor owned one). Thought the big Collins transmitter was a Gates because the same color scheme as an OLD Gates AM the station I worked at dumped for a new Continental (0-10KW in ten seconds flat! vs old Gates popping breaker 2 of three times after 10 min warmup.)
Doc
 

Pete Deets

Active member
Hi Doc,
Thanks for posting, but next time please add a "dribble bib" warning. Where'd you see the Gates console? I did see a Collins console right beside the 20V3 transmitter but didn't spot anything from the "Quincy Tin Works"............PD

Oops - I typed the wrong number. The Collins Broadcast transmitter is a 20V2. The V3 was the next newer and had a different meter panel at the top.....PD
 
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dkamp

eMail NOT Working
+1. Unless there is a walkway that allows access to the cabling for all that stuff, it is a headache to work on in the making. But there is some nice stuff there, and likely cubic yards of money spent.
When I built my hamshack, that's exactly how I did it... there's a false wall with walkway behind... and a big ground busbar along the floor underneath, DC buss under the desk, and wire troughs along the ceiling for coax.

Mine, however, is restricted to one small part of the house. His, is the entire house... and the 'shack' is just the operating station, the rest is a museum... a shrine of modulation history... a church of hollow-state audiography... a wax museum made of steel, glass, cloth, and paper... swinging chokes and vacuum caps, grid bias and cathode lift, breadslicers and multipliers riding megacycles on hetrodynes, chasing DX in the search of the one true magic crystal, in the double-balanced mixer, slope-detecting the eternal continous wave...

:rotfl::rotfl:
 

Thaumaturge

In Memory Of
You're correct, it's a Collins. Once again fooled by color scheme. Looking closer I see clear differences.... as best I can recall. Was back in 1978... so like wow, 41 years ago.

One event I remember quite clearly from that time was replacing the old Gates 10kw with the new Continental The Gates had this massive 400 lb plate modulation transformer (the Continental used a modified Dority {sp?} modulator). Anyway the chief engineer and I managed to muscle, drag, lever and winch this big hunk of iron reasonably close to the front door. We were sitting back afterward just recovering and the station manager walked by and pointed at the transformer and said:"move that into the corner." "No!" both the chief and I replied without hesitation. "No?" he asked in surprise. "Well, if you can tip one corner up we'll move it." one of us told him (don't recall who). He like poked at it and said: "Oh... I get it."

I remember we replaced like three old Gates consoles with Cetec-Spartas In AM control, FM control and production. Then put two small Mcmartin consoles in the newsroom. The chief had switching set up to put AM, FM or Production on air through ether AM or FM transmitter chains. I spent most my time running Belden 8251 cable and phasing 103 sets of tape heads a week.... Sorry, went off on memory tangent. Will only further say training myself to make a top 40 AM-FM station sound as good as possible absolutely ruined me for enjoying mp3 files.
Doc
 

dkamp

eMail NOT Working
All those radios and he probably talks on a 2 meter handheld! :brows:
Considering that he was one of the pivotal figures in the creation of 2m repeaters in the first place, it would be unlikely that he doesn't. He's the de-facto communications center for Washington Island...

Drive up Door County, take the W.I. ferry to the island, and explore... it's a neat place.
 

Harry

Administrator
Staff member
I would lay in a good reminder here to have a good ground bus to bond all those chassis onto.

You don't want this going up one arm and down the other when doing casual operating.
 

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Pete Deets

Active member
Hi Doc,
Yup, appearances can be deceiving. What tipped me was the badge on the panel. Of the time, Gates, Collins and RCA logos were quite similar and in the photos it is difficult to tell.

While I was in college in the late 70's I had a part time job at my hometown 500w AM Blowtorch. It may have been a small station but everybody listened to it. I was lucky enough to be there as they went through a major rebuild including expansion of the studios and newsroom and a new console for the main studio. I can't remember what went in but we pulled a tube-type Gates that was about the vintage of the Collins in the article. The Collins 830D transmitter with tube finals was also replaced with a Harris MW-1A solid state. That one was also an instant-on but hated lightning.

When you mention head alignment I thank God I only had a very few stereo cart machines I dealt with. Most were mono and a challenge in their own right. The stereo challenge for me was saved for the reel-to-reel machines. I can still hear in my sleep, "This is Magnetic Reference Laboratories reproducer test tape 21T-204 recorded full track at a reference level of 240 nanowebers per meter with no compensation for multi-track reproduction." What makes me despise mp3 "reproduction" is a four year stint as chief engineer of a beautiful music station. You think Top 40 was rough, the technical folks at Bonneville were always on us for what we were doing to their "BM". If you watched the mod monitor you had to be able to see the 25 cycle trip tones off air or they would be screaming. Fun times & I wouldn't trade it.

One thing you triggered in my head with the modulation transformer is the fact we are still discussing old iron here on Stak one way or another......PD
 
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