• If you like antique engines, vintage tractors or old iron, please register and join us. When you register on Smokstak, give complete answers and fill in all blanks. Be Considerate, this is an application to JOIN Smokstak, therefore it becomes part of a decision to open the door to you or send you off to the dropout file. Place your City, State, Country in the location box and it will be compared to where the internet lookup utilities say that you are. Don't give me a zip code to look up, the Eject button is much easier. We get hundreds of applications, so there is not time for monkey business.

Coil Question

neverfear

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
05/10/2019
I have this coil I want to use to fire an igniter engine. What would be an appropriate voltage to use? I have 6 or 12 volt batteries.
Also, If anyone knows,what are the 2 studs on the rim?
Thanks
 

Attachments

Nick

Registered
Last Subscription Date
04/18/2014
Re: Coil question

I have one of these and it works perfectly fine on 6V. Always thought the two studs were to keep it from rolling around?
 

cobbadog

Registered
Re: Coil question

I've never seen one of these before but does 'gas light' have anything to do with the 2 studs? Spark jump between them or they make contact when mounted in a gas heater and send the spark to ignite gas?

I am just guessing though.
 

Kirk Taylor

Registered
Re: Coil question

I've never seen one of these before but does 'gas light' have anything to do with the 2 studs? Spark jump between them or they make contact when mounted in a gas heater and send the spark to ignite gas?

I am just guessing though.
Those coils were used to remotely ignite gas lamps. The lamps were mounted high enough on a wall or post to be out of reach. Inside of the globe was a device that worked similarly to a low tension ignitor on a gas engine. The lamp ignitor mechanism was connected to the gas valve through a rod and handle that extended down to within reach of the person tending the lamps. To light the lamp, the coil and battery were connected to the remote lamp terminals. When the handle was pulled to open the gas valve, the ignitor was simultaneously struck thus lighting the lamp.
I've seen only one coil. It made a nice fat spark but drew considerably more current than a typical gas engine coil.
 

Nick

Registered
Last Subscription Date
04/18/2014
Wow that's neat thank you for the explanation!
 
Top