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Cool Old Twin 6-71 DC Generator

Motorhead

Subscriber
Age
67
Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
When I first started at UPS in 1976, They had some these old Grumman built, Chevy powered package cars. They were 1953 vintage and I am 1952 vintage. http://www.curbsideclassic.com/curb...-classic-olson-kurb-side-the-official-cc-van/

By 1976, the bodies and frames were getting real loose! Fast, straight-away driving was a butt puckering experience to keep it on the road. They were the stovebolt 235 with updraft carbs and a vane governor. You would be hammer down trying to pass someone in high gear and then all the sudden the vane closed down and it fell on it's face, and you had to retreat back to your lane.
 

AngrySailor

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/31/2020
So what year was She built?
She was built in ‘52. Last ship I sailed on was built in ‘43.

Power, I think there is limited movement. You still have to clean the last bit by hand.

I bet a strategic piece of twisted up coat hanger would have fixed that vane governor:O
 

The Diesel Doctor

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/28/2019
Angry Sailor, Your power transfer gear is in the D.D.series 71 engine and gears manual. Both engines turn the same direction. ALIMG_2637.jpg

IMG_2634.jpg

IMG_2631 (1).jpg

IMG_2635.jpg
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
06/10/2020
That is unbelievably cool! :D

I wonder if horizontal engines could be used, and the whole assembly could go under the floor of my bus, in place of the single engine that's there now?

Redundancy, run one engine most of the time, alternate between the two every so often, double power on grades, man, that would be sweet!
 

AngrySailor

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/31/2020
That would be cool! I wonder if they would sound different every time they’re clutched in together or if it would be even noticeable that the phasing between them would be different every time. It may not sound as even as say a 12v71:shrug:
 

miltruck

Registered
Because all cylinders fire every stroke, I believe that the phasing is less critical than with a 4 cycle engine. I'm guessing about 300-325 hp at 1700-1800 rpm. If the exhausts are water cooled, I will bet that the noise is really not that bad, just a lot of gear noise. The complete unit w/ gear case must weight close to 2 tons if everything has an iron case/block/head.

A variation of this setup was used in WWII for one of the diesel versions of the M4 Sherman tank, about 375-400 hp or so. Problem was fuel supply for the military at the time was mostly gas so not a lot of them were deployed. Plus the Ford V-8 gas version of the M4 had 500 hp, weighed a lot less than the dual diesels and had more ground speed. Both engines must have sounded great (loud) cooped up in the steel hull of the tank. Would hate to try and start one of these in a hurry during the Battle of the Bulge with the thermometer hovering just above zero. Would need a blow torch stuck in the blower to heat the intake air up so it would maybe even fire with the old style injectors and the low compression pistons of the day. Those tanker crews were real men.
 

AngrySailor

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/31/2020
Dry exhaust but it’s piped up the funnel outside the engine room and insulated. I ran them a couple days ago, didn’t clutch them in but ran them up to operation rpm. They weren’t loaded so noise wasn’t too bad but then again I LIKE Detroit music! The blowers were probably the loudest noise. She’s got 4 oil bath air filters so that probably quiets her down some too.
 

Power

Registered
That is unbelievably cool! :D

I wonder if horizontal engines could be used, and the whole assembly could go under the floor of my bus, in place of the single engine that's there now?

Redundancy, run one engine most of the time, alternate between the two every so often, double power on grades, man, that would be sweet!
With all the accessories, maybe 9-10,000 pounds. Wonder how the bus would handle it. Vanman, did you say steering feels a bit light:O
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
06/10/2020
Haha, these are mid-engine buses, so I'd need to get the power steering in top shape!

My three axle bus weighs around 20k, give or take, and GVW is 45k, so would technically be doable. :cool: But that's a LOT of extra weight to be carrying around lol.
 
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