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Cooper paint colour

jayvee

Registered
Hi All,
I have been asked by a reader what the original paint colour (I guess name & paint number/code) is for a Cooper horizontal open crank engine. ??1915-1924.
Sorry, this is all the info I was able to get from the gentleman.
Can anybody help out?

Any info greatly appreciated.
Thank you for your time.
jayvee
 

Ray Freeman

Registered
When I did my KA I found some good original under a bracket. Took it to a paint shop and got it matched. And I can't find a pic.
 

Scotty 2

Registered
Isnt the cooper engines light brunswick green?
Some Coopers are green, some are black.
The green ones are definitely a lighter green then Lister Mid Brunswick Green. I actually ran ours at a little rally yesterday and it'll run again today. I'll take a colour chart. A good mate also has one that's never been painted. It may well have some original paint on it somewhere to see if it's the same as what others think.

A good question is were they all the same green? Other makes are supposed to be a certain colour but variations of factory colour do happen. The green Southern Cross engines are supposed to be Huntington green but we have a YB that was deep brunswick green from the factory (as found under the tag). Variations of green (or any colour) must have existed over the years so I personally don't get caught up in the 'it's the wrong colour' or 'what's the factory colour' mind set.
Another question is what may have happened to the original paint colour on the engine over the years. Some paints do colour their colour over the years due to leaching or solvents or chemicals that may have been used on them or been near the engine, especially darker shades.

Cheers Scott
 

Scotty 2

Registered
Hello John.
I got my British Standard, or BS, colour chart out and it looks as though Cobba is pretty bloody close at light brunswick green. (colour code BS381 225)
Cheers Scott
 

cobbadog

Registered
I've seen way too much light brunswick green over the years on all sorts of toys not to have it stuck in my little mind. After the current project the next one will be painted up and it was mid brunswick green on my oxford allen rotoscythe.
 

Inter Bloke

Registered
Some Coopers are green, some are black.

Another question is what may have happened to the original paint colour on the engine over the years. Some paints do colour their colour over the years due to leaching or solvents or chemicals that may have been used on them or been near the engine, especially darker shade

Cheers Scott
I concur !
I am currently restoring a 1917 Cooper Coffee pot (Chicago Flexible shaft company) shearing plant, and when I started I "thought" it was painted "black" ! (that was the most prominent colour visible on the entire engine) I have seen several restored versions of the same machine that have been painted black and thought this was "original", until I disassembled mine ! What I found under the bracket that holds the shearing arms that are mounted directly on the engine itself and are protected from both "light" and "grease and acids" was an area that had an original patch of protected paint that showed a colour very close to "Deep Brunswick green " ! I was very surprised to find this, but it shows that over the years on these old machines the effect of the elements over time will alter what we can now see, so it pays to look "very" closely before you draw any conclusions about what was "original" !
 
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cobbadog

Registered
WOW, Deep Brunswick Green is very dark to start with and just might be how the black became one of the colours. Is it possible that the Deep Brunswick could change over time to be black looking, black tint is used in it.
I do not know this for certain but is food for thought.
 

Inter Bloke

Registered
WOW, Deep Brunswick Green is very dark to start with and just might be how the black became one of the colours. Is it possible that the Deep Brunswick could change over time to be black looking, black tint is used in it.
I do not know this for certain but is food for thought.
I think that is exactly what has happened with mine !
It "looked" to be "black", but when I found the protected sample it was very dark green. I am wondering if the couple of preserved engines I have seen that have been painted "black" were also dark green but weathered over time, so when the owner spruced them up they chose the most clearly "visible" colour, which was not what they would have originally had.
 
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