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Crocker and Wheeler Radio Motor Generator

newtoniii

Registered
Hi, I have discovered in my barn a crate with a generator/motor made for the Bureau of Steam Engineering in 1917, by the Crocker and Wheeler company. Can anyone let me know what this might have been used for and how it might have been powered ie by hand crank or steam engine? I know little of these kinds of devices and I am not really sure what I want to do with this but any help would be appreciated.
 

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armandh

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
09/02/2010
in the days B4 pulse width switching or inverter power supplies
motor generators were used to change one voltage/type to another
or control heavy loads with some gain [amplidyne]
better photos or the data from the name plates would help
 

Joe Romas

Subscriber
Age
76
Last Subscription Date
10/03/2019
I can't read the "motor" voltage but just a few weeks ago there was a thread about radios in rural outlying areas that did not have AC power but did have DC 32 volt maybe setups on site. The radios had one of these in the bottom to convert the say 32 volts DC to the required AC for the radio.

Joe
 

grif

Registered
Dynamotor, motor/generator, lots of names. Common in the marine trade to get 110 ac from 12/24 volts DC. Basicly a 12 volt motor, brushes and so on,,, with the field and armature windings only taking up 1/2 of the available room. Then on the other end,,, more brushes, with 110 windings and excitation interleaved with the "motor" parts. Just the same as two devices connected end to end,,, a generator and a motor, but sharing a common armature and housing. The old command radios from WWII used them to generate plate voltage,,, 24 VDC to 250VDC on some of the receivers,,, 24/600 for some of the transmitters.

I think we've still got one on a shelf where I work, 12dc 240ac, came from a dam for control systems before we got grid to the area. Way cool gizmo effect,,, efficency??? not so much, and not what you'd call clean power. really noisy on receivers. Everything you've come to love about brushes,,, but with twice as many.
 

Ronald E. McClellan

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
Bureau of Steam Engineering refers to ocean going steam ships. Is the date a patent date? If it is Patent dates were used for 20 years or more after it was issued. 1916 to 1917 was just the beginning of voice transmittion and not in common use until 1920. Before that radio transmittion was code with a spark transmitter. Spark transmittion lasted into the mid 1920's when it was outlawed due to interference with voice transmittion. I have two units similar to yours the motor is 110 V 60 Cyc to 110 V D.C. They were most likely used for power for voice transmitters. One of mine is marked Lentz. Ron
 

pegasuspinto

Registered
Bureau of Steam Engineering is Navy, more specifically, and is not so much about steam as it is about the whole ship. The name was changed to Bureau of Ships. The input and output ratings would help.

This is NOT hand crank or steam powered. It's an electric motor turning an electric generator.

Robert
 

newtoniii

Registered
Hi, Thank you for all of your input. There is another plate on it that says Generator: 250v, 5amps, .5kw, Field amps .51, cycles 500 and Syn Imp 27.7. It says on the motor side of the plate 120volts, 6.6amps, 2500 RPM. I think it does date to 1917 since the the name of the Bureau was changed to Bureau of Engineering in 1920 and in 1940 to the Bureau of Ships. It is an interesting item but I am not sure what I can do with it. Any suggestions? Thanks again!
 

pegasuspinto

Registered
My relevant background is I collect and repair antique radios and electronic equipment. Just a FYI ;)

I highly doubt this was used for a radio. My reasoning is that in 1917, radio technology was very primitive, and rectifying AC into clean DC was nearly impossible. It would of been far, far more in tune with the technology of the time for it to have DC output, as well. Even then it would of charged a battery bank, and then switched off when the radio was used. It's definitely not enough power for ANY transmitter of the era. I'd say it was used for running some kind of auxiliary equipment. I imagine it was produced by the same company that made them for the radios, which explains the 'radio' on the label.

As for what to do with it...the input and output ratings put it square into useless. !20v DC in and 250AC 500hz out is just awfully oddball.

If I had it, I'd look for a naval museum, or even the Smithsonian(if they are interested), and donate it. It had a use, it might of even been a really interesting use! Lots of secret research going on at that time-maybe a completely failed experiment. If the right museum has it, maybe one day it will be reunited with its story. How did it get there? You have a grandfather in naval research?

Robert
 

Chris Props

Registered
Age
32
I'd say it was used for radio. Spark transmitters of the era commonly used 500 cycle current into the spark transformer which produced a nice 500 cycle tone over the air.

I would definitely be interested, but shipping I would hate to imagine what shipping would be.
 

newtoniii

Registered
Hi, My brother is trying to get some information from the Navy. A donation may be a good choice but it weighs 250 lbs+. This was not something in my family. I purchased the house in 04 and it had been in the owners family since 1860. At one point there was someone living in the house doing all kids of interesting stuff. There was an old lathe, used for machining, from around 1895 (that I sold) so who knows what the guy was working on. There is other stuff and as I go through things if I find something electrical that is interesting, I will post it so you can take a look.
 
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