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Drillgine

Wynneman

Registered
Yeah I got that much figured out just trying to get an exact date and what it’s worth I’m not selling it I’m just curious
 

K-Tron

Registered
I am going to disagree with Brian's response. There is an Ohlsson & Rice section on the 'my old machine' forum. There are two guys on there who can date your O&R. My Drillgine is a 1976 and mine has a much lower serial number than yours. I would not doubt if yours was built in 1980+- a couple of years. They are fun to use. I upgraded the carburetor in mine to the later style with the stainless steel inlet needle. The original inlet needle was rubber and it did not hold up well. A long time back there was a dedicated Ohlsson & Rice forum and I bought genuine parts from a guy on there who owned the rights to the company and a lot of the old stock parts after the company closed its doors.

Chris
 

Wynneman

Registered
I know for sure it’s from 1960-1967 I found that much out about the serial number I’m pretty sure it’s from 1965 but not positive
 

K-Tron

Registered
Im sorry, you and Brian are correct, mine has one more digit in the serial number than yours does. I thought something was odd there as mine has the later style recoil and yours has the 60s style recoil.

Chris
 

Wynneman

Registered
Yeah I’m pretty sure mine is from 1965 I just got it given to me. It runs too but still needs work could run better. I think they are pretty neat. They were Originally made to drill for syrup in maple trees. Any idea what they are worth?
 

K-Tron

Registered
I do not think they were purpose built for maple syrup work. From what I have seen they were advertised as one of the first portable go anywhere utility drills geared toward homeowners and contractors. I have a G.H. Grimm sugar drill from just after WWII and it is quite different from the drillgine. It is on a backpack which allowed the operator to walk with it right through the woods. King also made a maple sugar drill, although there product had a flexible shaft to transmit power from the engine. The drillgine is just like your modern battery drill, just engine driven instead of electric, and LOUD. I tend to over-value whatever I work on, but I wouldnt sell mine for 350. I have a mint condition tool box with mine. I would think a good running clean drillgine with good paint has to be worth at least 200. There was another Ohlsson & Rice drill called the mini-mota. It has three different output shaft speeds. They are really quite hard to find. I have only ever seen one.

Chris
 

Wynneman

Registered
I do not think they were purpose built for maple syrup work. From what I have seen they were advertised as one of the first portable go anywhere utility drills geared toward homeowners and contractors. I have a G.H. Grimm sugar drill from just after WWII and it is quite different from the drillgine. It is on a backpack which allowed the operator to walk with it right through the woods. King also made a maple sugar drill, although there product had a flexible shaft to transmit power from the engine. The drillgine is just like your modern battery drill, just engine driven instead of electric, and LOUD. I tend to over-value whatever I work on, but I wouldnt sell mine for 350. I have a mint condition tool box with mine. I would think a good running clean drillgine with good paint has to be worth at least 200. There was another Ohlsson & Rice drill called the mini-mota. It has three different output shaft speeds. They are really quite hard to find. I have only ever seen one.

Chris
It’s just what I read from an online antique tool read that the original purpose was for drilling into maple trees idk
 

Wynneman

Registered
I do not think they were purpose built for maple syrup work. From what I have seen they were advertised as one of the first portable go anywhere utility drills geared toward homeowners and contractors. I have a G.H. Grimm sugar drill from just after WWII and it is quite different from the drillgine. It is on a backpack which allowed the operator to walk with it right through the woods. King also made a maple sugar drill, although there product had a flexible shaft to transmit power from the engine. The drillgine is just like your modern battery drill, just engine driven instead of electric, and LOUD. I tend to over-value whatever I work on, but I wouldnt sell mine for 350. I have a mint condition tool box with mine. I would think a good running clean drillgine with good paint has to be worth at least 200. There was another Ohlsson & Rice drill called the mini-mota. It has three different output shaft speeds. They are really quite hard to find. I have only ever seen one.

Chris
Where could I get a carb kit for it?
 

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