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Duplex Vacuum hot air engine in popcorn wagons?

Brent Rowell

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08/14/2016
The attached image is a scanned page from Andy Ross' 1977 book entitled Stirling Cycle Engines. These engines were made in Chicago under several different names including the Duplex Vacuum Motor Co., Kessler & Heap, Ideal Vacuum Motor Co. and the Kessler Motor & Engineering Co. Very little is known about founder Louis Kessler or his companies, although Kessler was a German immigrant and the engines are nearly identical to German Heinrici engines (but with air cooling rather than water jackets).

I've asked Andy R. and he doesn't know where he found the image with the popcorn wagon and was wondering if anyone else had ever run across it? It's the only reference I've seen showing a stirling engine being used to make popcorn. Any other references or advertisements for these engines and/or any of the above companies would be greatly appreciated. Hopefully we will see an example at the upcoming hot air engine show in Greenville, OH this summer--don't miss it.
 

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Brent Rowell

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08/14/2016
Thought you might like to see one of these engines in the flesh (from 1921). These were supplied with kerosene burners and tanks which were pressurized with air from inside the engine. Still hoping someone might have other old advertisements or further information about the popcorn wagon ad in the previous post. Thanks.
 

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Brent Rowell

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Last Subscription Date
08/14/2016
I just found the answer to my own question. The image of the popcorn wagon below came from a 1914 catalog of the C.E. Dellenbarger Co. of Chicago. The company sold popcorn machines and wagons. The second image is from their 1912 catalog. The company offered all their machines with the option of hot air engine or electric motor power.

Dellenbarger was apparently a competitor to Cretors, Dunbar, and others companies making popcorn machines.
 

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