• If you like antique engines, vintage tractors or old iron, please register and join us. When registering, please provide your CITY and STATE as your location!

Edison DC dynamo “wiring help”

Jonesey

Registered
G’day from down under. I’ve just acquired what looks like an old Edison DC dynamo (Refer photos) but the wiring is either missing or destroyed. Looking at the net it appears to be either an Edison or Ediswan dynamo, the ID plaque is missing so would anyone know the brand and vintage ? The other problem is the wiring, I assume that the thick field wires (terminal B,C,D in drawing) are connected in series to the brushes and load (.2 ohms). The thin wires (green and terminal A & E in drawing) read 32 ohms on each field and I think need to be connected together and wired to the second brush gear in parallel. Could anyone confirm if this is correct ? Any help would be much appreciated. Many Thks Jonesey1C2CF5CC-860D-4F68-A456-01C49628FB45.jpeg92215686-8E42-44FC-914D-85B0E35D19FD.jpegD4FC3083-3860-4774-A6C5-9CB6E09255D9.jpeg87825034-3293-4280-BEAE-E58B433602F8.jpeg1C2CF5CC-860D-4F68-A456-01C49628FB45.jpeg1C2CF5CC-860D-4F68-A456-01C49628FB45.jpeg92215686-8E42-44FC-914D-85B0E35D19FD.jpegD4FC3083-3860-4774-A6C5-9CB6E09255D9.jpeg87825034-3293-4280-BEAE-E58B433602F8.jpeg
 

Ronald E. McClellan

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
The wire from the brush that goes to B I would move it to D. The wire from the brush to C I would move it to B. That will give a parallel ( shunt) hook up. The wires form A and E I believe are to control coils through a variable resistor to change the output of the dynamo. Check continuity to make sure there are no bad connections. Turn it about 1800 RPM and see if it will light bulbs. If that doesn't work try reversing the wires that go to B and D. If it blows out 110V bulbs put two in series for 220V. Looking at the condition , the brushes may not be making good contact. Ron
 

Jonesey

Registered
Hi Ron. The heavy wires have not been disturbed and are connected to their original posts, so assumed it was wired in series. After giving it a good clean up especially on the commutator I will renew the old wiring and give it a try in parallel on the field. I do have a nice heavy duty resistor (Refer photo), just to clarify the thin wires from A and E, will I still need to connect them to the second brush gear (green ?) and then install a line from A to E through a variable resistor ?
Many Thks Les
 

Attachments

Radiomike

Registered
If there are two windings on each field pole then it may be a compound wound set. The 36Ω windings would be the shunt field. The heavy series windings would form the series field. Control would be usually done by varying the series field current. It all needs a good clean and insulation resistance tests to ground. Mike
 

Jonesey

Registered
If there are two windings on each field pole then it may be a compound wound set. The 36Ω windings would be the shunt field. The heavy series windings would form the series field. Control would be usually done by varying the series field current. It all needs a good clean and insulation resistance tests to ground. Mike
I was thinking the same since the way it was originally wired up, so would a heavy duty variable resistor (Refer photo) installed in the load line (C to D on drawing) be the way to control the series field coil current. I intend to run the dynamo from a Sunshine stationary engine and yes I will pull apart all the connectors and brush gear for cleaning and install some globes to see if it will start charging. I don’t know who was the manufacture or vintage but suspect Edison and around the 1890, any help in that area would be appreciated. Many Thks Jonesey
 

Attachments

Radiomike

Registered
When I said series field for control, I should have said shunt field. The speed or voltage control would be by varying the shunt field using a resistor like the one you have which is 46Ω. Normally one would expect a starting or regulating panel to be included somewhere. For starting as a motor series resistors would be added in the circuit which would be progressively removed as the speed increased. https://www.electricaleasy.com/2014/01/starting-methods-of-dc-motor.html To run as a dynamo would be easier as you can control the voltage using the shunt field. The polarity of the series field is important so be sure it is a dynamo or motor. Mike
 

Jonesey

Registered
Doesn't look like an Edison dynamo. Seems to have a Gramme type armature instead.
Would you have an idea who would have made it ? The square type field windings also look different to the Edison, have seen a similar style at the Queensland Power Museum and that was made by Ediswan which was a merged arrangement in the UK of Edison and Swan. If you go onto the net and search under Ediswan it should come up. Thks Jonesey
 
Top