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Edison Nickel Iron Battery

RETCPO

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From a quick GOOGLE search for "Edison Nickle Iron battery date code"

Date codes Thomas Edison Nickel Iron cells.


1922 – K_; 23 – L_; 24 – M_; 25 – N_; 26 – P_; 27 – R_; 28 – T_; 29 – W_; 30 – X_; 31 – Y_;
1932 – AA_; 33 – BB, 34 – CC_; 35 – DD_; 36 – EE_; 37 – FF; 38 – GG; 39 – HH; 40 – JJ;
41 – KK_; 1942 – LL; 43 – MM; 45 – RR; 46 – TT; 47 – WW- 48 – XX; 49 – YY; 50 – AB; 51 – AC; 52 – AD
1953 - AE; 54 – AF; 55 – AG; 56 – AH; 57 – AJ; 58 – AK; 59 – AL; 60 – AM; 61 – AN; 62 – AP;
1963 – AR; 64 – AT; 65 – AW; 66 – AX; 67 – AY; 68 – BA; 69 – BC; 70 - BF


http://www.fieldlines.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=144658.0;attach=1818

:salute:
 

Randy56

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Hello, Do you know how to date Edison Nickel - Iron Metal cased 1.2 volt cells. I think mm means 1943. There is a date code out there somewhere. I have 22 of these and would like to recondition them. Can you help?

Thanks Randy
 
I read the entire thread and I'm surprised no one has mentioned this......

Get several people together and do a "group buy" from a Chinese or Russian manufacturer. An import specialist would be needed, but the minor cost would be spread over several people and a large order would no doubt mean a discount. You might even consider a "group bank loan" and then each person pay his share of the payments. Yeah, it could get confusing so someone would have to be in charge of handling the finances.....but it could work.

Once they're delivered stateside (probably a Pacific port) it would be the responsibility of the buyers to pick them up. Okay, some would have to drive a long ways for their prize, but it would be a once in a lifetime purchase, right? It would be worth it.

Yes, you need more Edison cells than lead acid for a given voltage, but to me the positives far outweigh the negatives (no pun intended). I'd love to have a set......even small ones.........for my Delco Light plants.
 

DirkEU3000

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I just could not justify buying Edison Nickel Iron over Edison Lithium Iron. I've heard people say that the lifespan of LiFePO4s is often understated, that they are 15 year cells. Way lighter, no maintenance, and with 80% discharge and max efficiency you need less amp hours than Nickel Iron. Or maybe I was just brainwashed by these videos...

https://youtu.be/QrAwI7SxLh4

https://youtu.be/G-9ouRBXGqg

https://youtu.be/czLMHysEHPs

https://youtu.be/9zzEMZrMfKU

If there are flaws in the videos please point them out to me, I'm not looking to win an argument with anyone about battery types, I'm just trying to get beyond misinformation, I'm a novice myself who has eye'd up Edison's LiFePO4 as well as NiFe solar off grid packages. Then I saw these vids recently and don't know what to think.
 

I like oldstuff

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Last Subscription Date
11/09/2015
I'm no expert on stationary cells by any stretch of the imagination.
But I have a friend who owns (just retired) a fairly large company that does a lot of business in motive and backup battery systems, around $20 million per year.

Bottom line is this.
All the Chin manufacturers be it Lipo, Edison alkalines, and lead acid cells are providing crap quality. The cases leak and crack, the case to lid seal leaks and the posts leak. Their power ratings are over stated and often provide 1/3 of what is published. The life is also often 50% of what is stated. So be wary of you intend to buy one of these installations.

The best bang for the buck is still flooded lead acid which has a high power density and is still the cheapest. He says eventually the lithiums or NiMh with ultra capacitors will be improved and some day eclipse lead acid. Maybe in 10-15 years.

The chins have no interest in improving the quality as they know they're the cheapest game in town. So if you're looking for a battery bank, go for big lead acid cells with a lot of acid capacity. Big, bulky, stinky and heavy but still your best bet.
 

DirkEU3000

Registered
All the Chin manufacturers be it Lipo, Edison alkalines, and lead acid cells are providing crap quality. The cases leak and crack, the case to lid seal leaks and the posts leak. Their power ratings are over stated and often provide 1/3 of what is published. The life is also often 50% of what is stated. So be wary of you intend to buy one of these installations.

The best bang for the buck is still flooded lead acid which has a high power density and is still the cheapest.
Do you, or anyone know where the best bang for your buck is for high quality LiFePO4s? For starters I just want a nice LiFePO4 to simply keep charged from my wall outlet in order to have some small basic stuff if I lose power. Maybe I'll add on to it later but that's all I want right now.
 

Thaumaturge

In Memory Of
Age
68
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
I don't know if they are the best bang for buck, but I have gotten nothing but quality cells from all-battery.com. Ni-cad cells I bought from them about four years ago are still going strong.
Doc
 

I like oldstuff

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Last Subscription Date
11/09/2015
Do you, or anyone know where the best bang for your buck is for high quality LiFePO4s? For starters I just want a nice LiFePO4 to simply keep charged from my wall outlet in order to have some small basic stuff if I lose power. Maybe I'll add on to it later but that's all I want right now.
Ten years ago I bought decent cells in 100 lots from an operation in Korea. I don't recall the vendor now. These were 4" wide, 1.5" thick and about 7" tall.
*Note that these are individual cells and you MUST install monitoring circuitry to each cell to prevent runaway that will be like a mini Fukushima.

Just start googling for the capacity you need.
 

Deveak

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I did a ton of research into this a while back. Even order a small changhong cell, the type resold in the US for ridiculous sums.
The mark up on them is massive and honestly the cell quality is extremely poor. The chinese love to cut corners. Basically the chemistry and nickel plated steel are what give it life. No room for the chemicals to move or fall out of the plate. The chinese cells used razor thin metal, poor nickel plating and they skimp on the lithium hydroxide, a dopant for the electrolyte that makes it last longer and charge more efficiently.
I would watch this thread, anytime nickel iron batteries are discussed various industry players seems to magically join a forum under whatever name and begin arguing and mud slinging. I cam across it a lot when I looked into the batteries. Reminds me a lot of the small wind mill market, very sad.
They are pretty simple but the biggest issue is nickel itself. You can make your own nickel hydroxide (nickel hydroxide III, black nickel oxide) but its expensive, typically 11 dollars a lb bought from a US supplier in bulk or 20 dollars a lb from pottery suppliers. 11 grams per AH. So basically 9 grams per watt is the typical amount in a pocket cell, thats how much i counted on my scale when i tore the cell down. Negative is iron oxide, aka red rust in powder form. Older nickel iron cells used nickel flake for conductivity since nickel hydroxide is a poor conductor. The chinese cells did not appear to use anything but the nickel hydroxide in the positive unless maybe they used carbon black. It was a black powder with nothing else in it.
Negative was iron oxide and nothing else. Electrolyte was potassium hydroxide and lithium hydroxide as an additive that keeps it from being contaminated by carbon dioxide and raised cell performance. 40 grams per liter I think was the typical dose but higher doses help, even as high as 80.
They do suffer from electrolyte contamination. I've read forum posts by owners finding out that as low as 8 years you need a refresh. Most of these cells do not have mineral oil as per the manufacturer which is a mistake. The older edison cells had mineral oil for a reason.
Thats about it. Each chemical is held in place by a rigid metal frame thats nickel plated with very fine mesh screens that act as a pocket. I do mean VERY Fine. I could only guess the mesh size. Pin hole. You might be able to use a thin steel foil and pierce it with a sewing machine to make the mesh.
Of course all this steel is nickel plated. The main cost is always nickel though. Prices have fallen a lot, at one point it was 15 dollars a lb on the market when india closed its nickel exports. Now its 6 dollars but its still expensive. Most nickel is alloyed so finding large chunks of it for electroplating or most importantly nickel hydroxide synthesis is impossible and expensive. In reality you pay near 20 dollars a lb for nickel online.
Scrap is almost always alloyed. I have no idea how to separate the nickel without contaminating it with other metals.
Look up ED WARD on youtube, he has an entire series on them. Not sure if he is even still alive, sounded like an older man and his videos are 8 years old or more with no updates.
 
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