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Electronic Buzz Coil by Nick Rowland Has a Super Strong Spark

K-Tron

Registered
Gil, That is quite an impressive setup, however you should not be testing a buzzcoil near your computer. You can tell how noisy that buzzcoil is from how it immediately turns off your computer monitor the second you put power to the coil. Either there is no capacitor being used for filtering, or it is grossly undersized. You will do permanent damage to your computer if you continue to operate that buzzcoil near it.

Chris
 

Gil Garceau

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/01/2019
Thanks, Chris. I noticed that sometimes when running a small engine even with a regular high tension coil,
or an igniter engine, the monitor will blink or briefly display a couple static lines or the speakers might
make a little noise.
Fortunately I have never had one not return to normal right away. Considering I have run small
engines on this desk for the last 12 years.... there must be a little luck involved.
Thanks for the good tip!
 

NAR

Subscriber
Age
40
Last Subscription Date
01/09/2019
I usually don’t show test videos because they’re not too exciting but below is a video put together from some random test clips comparing different ignition systems. I’ve compared a lot of ignitions but to keep the video shorter & simple, it only shows comparisons between 4 different ignitions; (see first picture below).

-an old wooden Ford Buzz (trembler) coil,

-a large automotive (single spark) coil,

-a Bosch relay buzz coil ignition (circuit like found on the internet),

-and one of my RMC Impulse-drive buzz coils (like Gil showed above).


I’m not sure how others test their ignition systems & if there are proper ways to do this but the video below shows a couple of my testers. I have shelves full of ignition testers for different things I’ve designed & built from random stuff/junk over the years.

The RPM tester used in the video below can do quite a bit of things like find the max RPM of an ignition system when using different spark gaps & lengths, & under different battery voltages if wanted. It can also be used to find the max RPM of the spark in a variable pressure chamber along with the variables listed. It can also measure ignition lag at different RPM with these variables (different voltages, spark gaps & pressures). This tester uses a Hall sensor for points but it also has a conventional set of automotive-type tungsten points that can be used to test RPM using the variables listed above. One of the bad things about this ignition RPM tester is that ignition dwell on the Hall sensor can’t be changed (the time the coil is on/charging); the Hall sensor dwell on this tester is set permanently at 55 degrees but I do have another tester where this can be varied.

In the video below, this RPM tester is only used to compare max RPM of the 4 different ignition systems listed above when on 12 volt with a 0.25” spark gap.



Temperature of the room the tests were done in was usually around 64 F at that time. Also the spark gap electrodes used had smooth rounded (spherical) ends. These take a little more voltage to break the spark gap down but the test results are more repeatable/accurate. At the end of the RPM tests in the video I put in a clip from a test showing a pointed electrode 0.25” spark gap just to show the increase in max RPM.

The ignition systems will run lower max rpm with larger gaps, & higher max rpm with smaller gaps. (With a 1/16” open air gap the max RPM of the RMC impulse-drive coil can be around 60,000 RPM.) The open air 0.25” spark gap used in the video compares to about a 1/16” wide spark plug gap in a 4 to 1 compression ratio engine (similar to the old hit & miss engines).


The Jacob’s ladder shown in the video had a set minimum breakdown gap of 0.390” & it used 0.1” diameter wire electrodes. The gap distance at its top measured at 2.062”.


The endurance tester shown near the end of the video can run an ignition system for days or weeks or however long & I’ve used it to do a lot of component heat tests. The rpm of its ignition contact points can be varied & the dwell of the points can be varied. The spark gaps & lengths can be varied & the spark can be grounded to the frame (like a conventional engine) or the spark can be grounded into the insulated contact (in case anyone would ever wire one like this I wanted to test solid-state ignition systems to see how they hold up long term like this). This tester also has negative or positive spark grounding options that can be tested. So far I’ve worn out 4 motors on it over the years.

I don’t recommend doing this to one but I once ran one of my impulse-drive buzz coils on this endurance tester for 2 days on 12 volt without any spark plug wire (no spark ground) & it was still fine after.



The 2nd pic below shows brief info comparing the 3 buzz coil ignition systems in the video.

The 3rd pic below shows the “crankshaft degrees per coil spark” of each buzz coil when it is on with its ignition contact points closed. This shows how much the engines crankshaft will have to rotate for each of its buzz sparks, (how much the crankshaft will have to rotate after the first spark before the 2nd spark from the "buzz" of the buzz coil occurs.)

The 4th pic shows an old Ford buzz coil in a pressurized spark gap compared to an RMC impulse-drive buzz coil in the same conditions.

-Nick
 

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NAR

Subscriber
Age
40
Last Subscription Date
01/09/2019
Here’s a couple other videos;


RMC impulse-drive buzz coil without the internal “safety” spark limiter;





Older video of some coil tests I took;





The pic below shows the wiring diagram of the RMC impulse-drive buzz coil.

-Nick
 

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