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Exhaust Stack

bench

Registered
Fellas,
Need some ideas on an exhaust stack for my 12hp Pattin engine.
Building a new garage for my engines and I think I would like for my exhaust to go up thru the roof as I think the noise level would be a bit lower than going thru the side wall.
I am worried about the weight it would put on the exhaust port which comes out the side of the cylinder area.
What type of material would you use and what type of cap(rain protector) would you put outside on the end of the pipe.
Any pictures would help me a bunch once I have seen how its done.
Thanks
 

Mike Monnier

Hoarder
Age
43
Last Subscription Date
12/18/2019
Couple options you can consider. 1. Use a pot muffler so that it supports the weight of the exhaust pipe. 2. Make a horizontal pipe run out of the port; install a tee fitting and then run a pipe, with a cap, down to the floor to support the weight of the vertical exhaust pipe. You can slide a wood shim underneath if it doesn't quite reach the floor.
 

dkamp

eMail NOT Working
If you're talking about a permanent installation, dig a hole in the ground, put several inches of gravel in there, a 55-gallon drum in it, with some holes drilled in the bottom. Put a stout metal plate over the top, with a 2-3" pipe flange... put your stack on that, but put a tee in it a little below the engine's exh port elevation. Use a piece something formable or flexible. Put a rain cap or turned tip on the top, with a bird-screen.

Any rain or condensation, from either the vertical stack OR the exhaust port, will drain down into the barrel. Firing pulses will be absorbed into the barrel, reducing the bark of the engine firing.
 

Joel Sanderson

Registered
If you're talking about a permanent installation, dig a hole in the ground, put several inches of gravel in there, a 55-gallon drum in it, with some holes drilled in the bottom. Put a stout metal plate over the top, with a 2-3" pipe flange... put your stack on that, but put a tee in it a little below the engine's exh port elevation. Use a piece something formable or flexible. Put a rain cap or turned tip on the top, with a bird-screen.

Any rain or condensation, from either the vertical stack OR the exhaust port, will drain down into the barrel. Firing pulses will be absorbed into the barrel, reducing the bark of the engine firing.
No no no no no no! Don't do that. (Please don't be offended, Mr. DKamp.) I was told to put holes in my underground system, and it was a disaster! Both my underground systems filled with water, and it was a total waste of time and money--and I very nearly ruined my Reid because I didn't know it had filled with water and the exhaust heat wasn't getting away. I warped the cross-over valve! You don't need holes. It needs to be completely gas and water proof. The system gets hot enough there won't be enough condensation to matter--certainly not with a 12 horse engine. I ended up completely abandoning the underground system on both engines and ran the Reid's pipe out the side of the building. I would never do another underground system, with or without holes for water to come and go. Have everything where you can access it to change it.
 

dkamp

eMail NOT Working
No no no no no no! Don't do that. (Please don't be offended, Mr. DKamp.) I was told to put holes in my underground system, and it was a disaster! Both my underground systems filled with water, and it was a total waste of time and money--and I very nearly ruined my Reid because I didn't know it had filled with water and the exhaust heat wasn't getting away. I warped the cross-over valve! You don't need holes. It needs to be completely gas and water proof. The system gets hot enough there won't be enough condensation to matter--certainly not with a 12 horse engine. I ended up completely abandoning the underground system on both engines and ran the Reid's pipe out the side of the building. I would never do another underground system, with or without holes for water to come and go. Have everything where you can access it to change it.

Hi Joel!!! It's Dave, and next time I get sent over your way for a company assignment, I hope you're available for a visit... last time was a bust...

Hmmm... perhaps my description was unclear...

SOME underground systems have an exhaust tube that goes straight down, underground, and then the stack goes up. In the event of water accumulating, yeah, that'd be a problem, as it'd wanna do what water-lift mufflers in sailboats and houseboat generators use... that'd be exactly the situation you noted.

What I suggested, is that the stack, and the T are well above ground... the only part underground is the base of the stack and the barrel... exhaust comes out of the engine sideways, and a slight downhill slope, to the T... where it then must go straight up the stack. From the T down is a foot or two of vertical pipe, into the barrel... which is really nothing more than a dry-well for any moisture to depart.

In the circumstance of a high water table (I'm certain your topography applies, as mine sometimes does) the water level never gets above ground level... and the T is well above that point. I set up my ZC-208 this way, and it's been fine... even with the barrel full, it hasn't been a problem...
 

Joel Sanderson

Registered
Hi Joel!!! It's Dave, and next time I get sent over your way for a company assignment, I hope you're available for a visit... last time was a bust...

Hmmm... perhaps my description was unclear...

SOME underground systems have an exhaust tube that goes straight down, underground, and then the stack goes up. In the event of water accumulating, yeah, that'd be a problem, as it'd wanna do what water-lift mufflers in sailboats and houseboat generators use... that'd be exactly the situation you noted.

What I suggested, is that the stack, and the T are well above ground... the only part underground is the base of the stack and the barrel... exhaust comes out of the engine sideways, and a slight downhill slope, to the T... where it then must go straight up the stack. From the T down is a foot or two of vertical pipe, into the barrel... which is really nothing more than a dry-well for any moisture to depart.

In the circumstance of a high water table (I'm certain your topography applies, as mine sometimes does) the water level never gets above ground level... and the T is well above that point. I set up my ZC-208 this way, and it's been fine... even with the barrel full, it hasn't been a problem...
I didn't recognize your pen name, Dave. I'm glad you weren't offended. Thank you. What you're saying makes sense now that I've read it again. But what I did doesn't make sense at all, no matter how you look at it.

Here's what I did very wrong: I plumbed the Reid's exhaust into an 8" pipe buried under the engine room floor which came back up between the engine house and the shop to a stand pipe. I was told it was important to drill holes in it to let it drain, so I did. The problem wasn't just the holes, though; it was where I put it--exhausting between two buildings with their eves come together! How smart was that? It couldn't have been worse for water or for access. It filled it up with water that first fall. It took me awhile to figure out what the trouble was. If I hadn't had the holes in it, I'da gotten away with it, but it was still stupid to put it right under two eves.

The Fairbanks engine's exhaust flooded just as bad though. I put a 100 gallon propane tank directly under its exhaust. From there I ran a pipe under the foundation and up to a stand pipe. I drilled holes in the tank, just like I did the Reid's exhaust, and it filled with water too, even though it's not between the buildings. My engine house floor is a couple of feet below ground level, which probably puts the Fairbank's tank about five feet under ground. Bad idea.

This is Michigan, and it's wet here eleven months out of the year. We're the land of swamps and mosquitos, which I managed to forget when I did all this.

You'll be welcome back any time, Dave. Hopefully by then I'll have the 10 horse Fairbanks belted and running the shop. I've had it for eight years and haven't gotten around to it, since the Reid works so well.
 

con-rad

Registered
In my limited experience, a horizontal exhaust is quieter than a vertical one. My theory is that with the sound waves going up, there is nothing to buffer the noise and it can be heard in all directions. A horizontal pipe can direct the noise toward a hill, trees, etc and seems to dampen the sound.
Connor
 

Sonny Reese

Registered
Why can't the muffler barrel sit on top of the ground? It would still be big enough to deaden the sound I would think. Oil field and generator units have oversized mufflers set up like this!
 

bench

Registered
Why can't the muffler barrel sit on top of the ground? It would still be big enough to deaden the sound I would think. Oil field and generator units have oversized mufflers set up like this!
I would much rather have a horizontal exhaust if nothing more than not have to punch a hole in a steel roof which always seem to find a way to leak..
I can point the stack towards the woods and there are no houses for many miles.
 

bench

Registered
I would much rather have a horizontal exhaust if nothing more than not have to punch a hole in a steel roof which always seem to find a way to leak..
I can point the stack towards the woods and there are no houses for many miles.
That response was to reply to con-rad-sorry
 

Joel Sanderson

Registered
I would much rather have a horizontal exhaust if nothing more than not have to punch a hole in a steel roof which always seem to find a way to leak..
I can point the stack towards the woods and there are no houses for many miles.
Horizontal pipes draw starlings. Don't forget about them. Might need a screen or something.
 
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