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F 10 atlas lathe find

ulgydog56

Registered
traded 90.00 labor and had to haul it out of a older fellows basement, it has a 42inch base, good 4 up to 10inch die and has a milling attachment, came with Jacobs chuck, centering tool, plates, doggs, inside outside dia tooling knurling tool, many gears for screw threading and a bunch of tooling, it has 32 speeds. I did have to clean it up and the old 1/4 hp motor was fried, put in a 1/2 motor, every thing works now if I only knew how to use it, not a machinist...:bonk: but love tinkering with it....:D
 

Attachments

b7100

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
If you love tinkering with it and you (keep) tinkering with it you (will) become a machinist. You never know what you are capable of doing till you try.
 

dkamp

eMail NOT Working
Congratulations on a first lathe!!! The limits of the lathe are almost entirely limited to your imagination... having owned one, and seen many, I'll offer you this advise:

NEVER, EVER allow the leadscrew direction lever (that's the little gearbox at the left end of the leadscrew) get bumped partially disengaged, or shifted while the machine is in motion.

Don't use a milling attachment on it... ever.

On the Atlas lathe, the most common items to break, are the small pot-metal castings, and the leadscrew shift-box is the most frequent.

My Atlas-Craftsman came to me with that gearbox, and it's lever broken. was not able, at that time, to find any serviceable replacement, so I wound up fitting the leadscrew with a small electric gearmotor instead. I was able to make parts, just not cut threads.

You won't be needing those big tool bits... and don't waste time trying to use carbide- not enough power to cut, you'll only wind up breaking things. Best for the little Atlas is 1/4" HSS... and find yourself an AXA - class quick-change toolpost and set of holders. If you can fit a 3/4hp motor and a small VFD to it, set it to the middle belt positions (maximum wrap on both sheaves) you'll find it most handy. Make a toolpost grinding fixture... even a crude one from a HF die grinder with a plug-in speed control).
 

Kirk Taylor

Registered
...The limits of the lathe are almost entirely limited to your imagination... having owned one, and seen many, I'll offer you this advise:

Don't use a milling attachment on it... ever.
Why do you recommend to never use a milling attachment? Are you referring to just this particular lathe, or are you saying that milling attachments should never be used on any lathe? I would think that banning milling attachments would tend to limit one's imagination.
 

Pete Spaco

Registered
A small point, but the lathe is "10F" not "F10".
It appears that the gear cover on the left side of the lathe is not stock. I suppose a new cover could have been made for it at some time, but it looks suspiciously like an aftermarket change gear mechanism that was made and sold by a fellow from Chicago, Ill, I think. He might have sold kits for it.
I either met him or at least talked to him in about 1968, when I lived in the area for a short period of time.
I'd like to see some pictures of the change gear mechanism.

Not to rain on anybody's parade, dkamp. but I switch directions all the time while the lathe is running with that particular clutch.
As a matter of fact, I bought all the parts to convert my 10F to quick change gearbox, but didn't do it because I'd have to go back to the leadscrew drive lever and gears that can't be changed when the lathe is running. I bought a 12" Atlas/Craftsman with QC gearbox instead. But the 10F is still the go-to machine for most work.

Regarding: "not a machinist"----- Sometimes votech schools have evening classes where folks can go to learn the basics.

Pete Stanaitis
----------------
 

b7100

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
There are a lot of YouTube videos that are very helpful. Google Kieth Fenner or Kieth Rucker. Tubal Cain is another one. They are very helpful and more than happy to answer questions.There is a wealth of information on these sites. Between watching these videos and turning dials you should to be able to self teach yourself. Trial and error will be standard practice. I have broke a lot of tooling and scrapped a lot of parts ( still do). The machinist forum on this site is very helpful. HMEM is another site. There are others. Don't be afraid to ask questions.
 

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Congrats on your first lathe! If you learn to use it, it will open a whole new world of how to fix things and make custom parts for projects. I too will recommend taking a course if your local community offers one. Books and vids are good, but having someone teach you, either in a class or 1 on 1 in your shop is invaluable.

Sold my little Atlas last year to a friend, she has done a few things in past 6 months on her own yet is still very green. Yesterday she was working on adapting some Subaru shocks to a Miata and needed to make some custom parts and was unsure how to proceed, so I walked her thru first one, she cranked out the other 3 this morning on her own.

Don't get discouraged, it takes at least a 1000 projects to learn all the work arounds and tricks:D
 

ulgydog56

Registered
just so I know what would be the approx. value of this lathe...incase I die...well when I die...lol..:D and ya 10f thanks...
 

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
If you spiff it up, and have full set of change gears, somewhere between $250 and $1000 depending on area of country you sell it in. If it had a quick change gearbox the number might be higher, if you don't have full set of change gears number might be lower. Hate to say it, might be worth more sold piece by piece:uhoh:

The Atlas machines are popular with hobbyists, parts are plentiful, easy to work on, easy to move. Good little machine to have to make parts that don't fit together, fit:brows:.
 

dkamp

eMail NOT Working
Why do you recommend to never use a milling attachment? Are you referring to just this particular lathe, or are you saying that milling attachments should never be used on any lathe? I would think that banning milling attachments would tend to limit one's imagination.
Just on this one. The carriage flat ways and cross slide are small, hence, any slop results in enough deflection to put the dovetails under some impressive stress. Hang up a milling bit, it pops the compound in half.

Not to rain on anybody's parade, dkamp. but I switch directions all the time while the lathe is running with that particular clutch.
The most frequently broken component on the Atlas 9 lathes, are the shift dog, shift arm jaw, and front face of the gearbox. The gears, lever, and box are all Zamak... When shifted while turning, the dog breaks off, going into the leadscrew gear, and pushes through the front of the gearbox, breaking it in half. After an exhaustive search to find the replacement parts for mine, it was clear that there's three different kinds of gearboxes on the Atlas 9: those that have been shifted only in a stopped position, those that have been broken, and those that will be broken soon.

And for those that weren't escorted to doom by shifting, the next most immediate failure occured when the leadscrew was left engaged to the end of the carriage, or crashed into the workpiece or chuck.

These were not circumstances that happened to me... they were revelations brought to me through circumstances of advice- lessons hard-learned by all others from whom I sought replacements... it was a very futile search, which is why i went to electric leadscrew drive instead.

When assessing value, it depends on the buyer's intention. If they're a collector, and it's a complete, original, pristine machine to be used as decoration, it might draw a princely value. If they're interested in hard work, they'll pass on looking for an SB desktop 9, or graduate to a Heavy 10. I spun my SB9 up fast to wield carbide, and it was a ferocious metal-eating beastie that the Atlas could never be. I spent an hour on a Heavy 10 with a long bed, and decided that desktop lathes have their place, but in someone else's shop, simply because dedicating floor space for a serious toolmaker's machine was economically more sensible. I bought my Monarch 10EE for $750. My SB9 brought $1200.

But don't take this wrong- ANY Lathe, is better than NO lathe, and if you compare the Atlas 9 against a Chinese lathe, there's no contest... the Atlas will be less troublesome, and last longer if treated with care... and it's a perfect platform for learning.
 

Thaumaturge

In Memory Of
Age
68
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
Depends on where you live. In North East "rust belt" can maybe find them for a few hundred dollars, say $375 average. Out West here they go for about $600-$800. (The $600 ones sell fast)
Doc
 

Peter Holmander

Subscriber
Age
71
Last Subscription Date
12/23/2019
If you have zero experience at all, youtube is the way to go like another member suggested. I like tubalcain myself. His videos are clear, concise, and easy to understand. Community training is great if you can find it, but allot of that stuff where I live is not offered anymore.

https://www.youtube.com/user/mrpete222

Have fun, be safe, and please don't make the rookie mistake "Leaving the chuck key in the chuck: lol
 

bartlett0815

Registered
If you're going to learn operate the lathe by taking courses at your local community college then you may be waiting a while. I work at Cape Fear Community College (in purchasing) where we have a very good machining technology program. Before they ever let you lay hands on a lathe or mill, you are required to take classes in math, etc. and since some classes are only offered in spring or only in the fall, it may be a year or more before before you actually get hands on experience with a lathe. I would recommend buying the book "How to run a lathe." I have a reprint of one of the early editions and it is still a very good teaching tool. That book, plus some Youtube videos will teach you anything you need to know to be a hobby machinist.
Good luck,
Kevin in NC
https://www.grizzly.com/products/So...MI2-bVtK-i4QIVCGSGCh0pNAuXEAQYAyABEgJohfD_BwE
 

ronm

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
I don't think a school will teach you much about a manual lathe. My younger cousin took machining in high school, graduated just in time to get a job at the new Sundstrand plant that was opening up. When I got my Bridgeport, he said "I'll probably never lay hands on another one of those..." Point? schools are not teaching manual machining any more, jobs require CNC knowledge...
Sundstrand was a good employer for years, then they closed the plant here & moved it to Singapore...my cousin was in engineering by then, & moved to Singapore for several years. Came back home & now owns his own machine shop...CNC of course...
 

bartlett0815

Registered
I've never taken the course here but I was told that after all the classes on math, measuring tools, blueprint reading, etc. they give you a little time on the manual machines to get some basics but the bulk of the program focuses on CNC. Working in purchasing, the requisitions I see for that program appear to be mostly CNC related. It's rare to see them order simple stuff like HSS tool bits. There is a large General Electric facility here that builds jet engines on one side and nuclear fuel bundles on the other and most of our machining technology students are trying to get in the pipeline for that facility. It's the highest paying blue collar employer in this area and all their production is CNC. I showed .58 caliber bullet mold I had made to a graduate of that program and he almost couldn't believe I had made it on a manual lathe and mill.
Kevin in NC
 

Pete Spaco

Registered
Re: Evening basic machining classes for adults:
I attended such a one-night-a-week class like that for about 10 semesters over a period of years. It was a way for the schools to get MORE use from the manual machines that they used to give younger students a history lesson and, maybe a bit of the basics. True, the main goals of the vo-tech schools these days are to get people trained to be cnc button pushers.
The instructor at the first school that I went to made this abundantly clear. But when I asked if we'd get to use the machining centers, etc., he said "No. You don't learn the basics that way. And that's what I teach you guys here."

We didn't have to go through all the math, etc. classes mentioned earlier, but we did have to go through several "desk" sessions so the instructor was pretty sure that we wouldn't kill ourselves or break his stuff. After that, we did have to do a few simple required projects, and then we were pretty much left on our own to make anything we wanted to make, with the instructor there as coach. It was really cook because, when a "student" had a particularly complex or difficult operation to perform, the instructor would call us all together as he tutored the student through the process.

Anyway, whether a particular school still holds this kind of class depends upon that individual school's view of the value of public outreach.
So, I'd check around to see what might be available.

I agree that "How to run a Lathe" is a good start, but one should also check around the community to see if there's a machining interest group in the area, and join it.
Might even be worth it to run one small ad in a local shopper.

There's nothing like having a friendly knowledgeable person to help you get started.

Pete Stanaitis
---------------
 

ulgydog56

Registered
thanks fella's, I have a manual and a very basic understanding I just need to put some time in and I do know a machinist, there are a lot of small tool companys around here, Michigan- with older equipment, the big three still need one offs and prototypes, I will never master the machine but maybe tame it. thanks again....:bonk:
 

cobbadog

Registered
I bought a small lathe about a year ago with the only experience being olmost 50 years ago at school. As mentioned I watched many YouTube clips on doing basic machining and went from there and even got to making my own thread chasing dial which so far has been a great success. Also did the same with the purchase of a MIG welder. Started out as being gasless then over time went ot using gas and now I am confident enough with bot to at least have a go at most things. If it does work out have another go and leaqrn from your mistakes. So far no mistakes, even machining off a little bit too much worked out fine for the next project waiting in line so there was no waste.
Always step yourself through the proceedure and always keep safety in mind. Hands on for me is the best way to learn. You can read about brain surgery but don't let me near you with a scapel.
 
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