Fender Work?

Thinking about tackling making new fenders for the 28-44 Cockshutt. Could take them out, and there are a couple of guys within an hour's drive who do the work, but what fun is that?
What does a person need? There are a couple of beads in the fender tops, plus the rolled edge. In the fender sides, there are a couple of cross-type beads.
I see some of the local cheapo stores have the latest Chinese-made, bench mounted English Wheels for not much money. Is there another way of doing it?
What gauge of steel are you guys using?
All new to me.
Thanx.
 

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Russ Hamm

Subscriber
One thing about it, those replacement fenders seem expensive but those guys have to earn their money making them near to original as possible and pleasing the customers, its a lot of work especially the first pair of a certain model.
I have thought about making fenders myself, just for my own use. The bead roller would be the biggest expense, then if a guy wanted to roll a rod stiffener in the edge like some models im not even sure how to do that. The double folded edge would be something to conquer. I know a guy that has all that equipment in antique form that I would sure like to bother some day, seems like he is busy all the time.
 

Big Bird

Subscriber
A tilting die on a bead roller will make a bend on a radius. Like a wheel arch for instance
Cheap bead roller from harbor freight will do the trick as long as the metal is not to thick.
 

b7100

Subscriber
I have a bead roller I would sell with some dies and stand. Only problem is it is heavy and shipping is kind of pricey.
 
Use the same gauge of steel that is on the tractor now
Hard to get a good measure of the gauge in some areas, because there is no metal left. The rest has 82 years of exposure to the elements.

I will try to be a little more precise in my question - which gauge would persons, with experience in this area, recommend for ease of manipulation with simple forming tools, while providing a solid and durable structure? Would 16 gauge be easy to work, or would 18 or a thinner gauge be easier and still provide a reasonable finished product? Thanx.
 
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I don't know much about "rolling" new guards, but one thing I have heard is that all steel isn't the same ! If you are going to tackle a big job like this, have a talk to a steel expert to make sure you get a grade of steel that lends itself to the type of forming you want to do, and not just the correct gauge which may prove to be too hard to form for your application.
 

LukeSte

Subscriber
I made these fenders with nothing more than a shrinker and stretcher. Used 16ga. get a sweat going but was way faster than i would have guessed.. i had never used these tools before this but was easy to learn. Amazing how fast the metal comes together
 

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Phil Johnson

Sponsor
Most of the ones I've made have been 20 ga. cold rolled sheet steel, Some tractors used a heavier gauge, and those fenders are usually in much better shape. By the looks of the damage on yours, I would say they were originally 20 gauge steel.
 

uglyblue66

Subscriber
All I can add is,those tools like bead rollers take practice to use.I made a mess of the 2 beads I tried to roll back last spring.
They will work for the project but have defects.Practice!.
 

casertractor

Subscriber
Bump:D

Anymore progress with the fenders for this tractor? has steel been sourced or have new fenders been aquired for this tractor yet?
 
Not yet. I have had no time to think about them. There have been too many other fish in the pan.
Also, I am very lazy and highly disorganized. There probably won't be much done until spring now anyway. I have started hunkering down for winter - warmth and plenty of food. Games are over.
 

Bob in Mi.

Subscriber
One thing about it, those replacement fenders seem expensive but those guys have to earn their money making them near to original as possible and pleasing the customers, its a lot of work especially the first pair of a certain model.
I have thought about making fenders myself, just for my own use. The bead roller would be the biggest expense, then if a guy wanted to roll a rod stiffener in the edge like some models im not even sure how to do that. The double folded edge would be something to conquer. I know a guy that has all that equipment in antique form that I would sure like to bother some day, seems like he is busy all the time.
Russ,

You seem to have an idea as to how to make a fender, basically you have it right, don't bother with a english wheel.
The double outside edge is refer to as a downward hem, the inner is a downward flange The man that speaks of a "schrinker" for the rounding of the fender is correct. Reaction of the metal is key there, one being single and the other double. Bead roller to set the beads. Sounds good, right?

Well lets take a better look:

2 sheets 18 gauge cold rolled steel 150.00
Motorized Bead roller, hand crank not going to get it. 1000.00
Tooling for the rib 65.00
Harbor Freight Shrinker/stretcher 185.00

Sound about right, not even close!

Power hand held shear (cheap) 65.00 (good) 450.00
8' Brake (have to brake the edges) 2500.00 used

Your fenders are the same as 28-44 Hart Parr/ 99 Oliver I make them like the originals for 550.00 per pair.

The wire edge you spoke of, not that hard. time consuming and adds 100.00 to the price of a pair of fenders.

Bob the Fender Guy
Some of my fenders are in the classified ads.
 

Bob in Mi.

Subscriber
This is a Titan 10-20, just to give you an idea of what we do. It is not hard work. It does take 2 people. Machine expense, well, whole different matter.SANY0005.JPG
 
I just did a farmer fix on mine, not a new tractor so why new fenders, put a patch a little larger than tear or rust out,drill holes and put small bolts lock washers and nuts, I think that's the way Grandad would have fixed it. no new paint on a 92 year old tractor it was only new once.
 
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