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Finding coal for steam engine shows.

Maier

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/05/2016
At the Great Oregon Steam-up, where I volunteer during the summer, we all burn wood in our traction engines. Some of my friends and I have talked about possibly making coal available at the show as well for owner-operators who wish to use it. Where do larger shows like Rollag and Rough and Tumble get their coal from? I'm hoping to come up with a list of suppliers, contacts, prices per ton etc.
 

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
What kind of coal do you want? Anthracite or Bituminous? I know there are bit coal mines south of SLC, Sufco is only name I remember, and not sure if they are still in operation.
 

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
If you want some free coal, there is plenty still in basements in Ely and McGill, bring 5 gallon buckets, a shovel, and some utes with supple spines to lug it out;)
 

Pete Deets

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/01/2020
Dal, my experience with "basement coal" is that has been worth only what you've paid for it unless you want to go into the industrial clinker making business.

Maier, please forgive my ignorance but what town & state (although I'm guessing Oregon) is this show in? Thanks..............PD
 

Maier

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/05/2016
Dal, my experience with "basement coal" is that has been worth only what you've paid for it unless you want to go into the industrial clinker making business.

Maier, please forgive my ignorance but what town & state (although I'm guessing Oregon) is this show in? Thanks..............PD
The Great Oregon Steam-up is in Brooks, Oregon. Just north of Salem.

What kind of coal do you want? Anthracite or Bituminous? I know there are bit coal mines south of SLC, Sufco is only name I remember, and not sure if they are still in operation.
Bituminous. Less expensive than anthracite and also, to my knowledge, more suitable for traction engines.
 

Odin

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/13/2019
Most boilers are looking for hot gases, which means Bituminous coal or Lignite coal. Anthracite requires special consideration for proper firing, as it produces very little in the way of hot gas and most of its heat is released as radiant heat. Not only that, but Anthracite doesn't grab the oxygen as willingly as bituminous coal or firewood does. Drafting too aggressively with it runs a risk of fireside erosion from hot unclaimed oxygen getting through and eating the firebox or flues.

There used to be mines in Wyoming apparently that served up Rosebud coal- a form of lignite, which was the fuel that the Union Pacific Big Boy locomotives were intended to use. Getting proper Bituminous coal might require a fair amount of shipping charges, expect to have to buy a dumptruck or railcar's worth to make it worthwhile.
 

LCJudge

Subscriber
Age
60
Last Subscription Date
12/14/2019
Wished you were near KY. Coal used to be king here providing a lot of jobs and putting $$$$ into the economy. Cheap natural gas has been the method of firing generating plants for the last decade and has killed the coal industry. The coal is still here. Just no demand for it.
 
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