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Finding the lumber before you can use it-----

Pete Spaco

Registered
The powerline company cleared the easement on the west side of our property and I went looking for downed trees that might make lumber for woodshop projects:

Pete Stanaitis
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uglyblue66

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
11/07/2018
Most trees that grow along a right of way or clearing,have a bad habit of growing towards the open area. When you saw the log,the lumber will just curve that way after you stack it.
 

LCJudge

Subscriber
Age
60
Last Subscription Date
12/14/2019
Most trees in KY that are along easements or property lines are prone to have fencing, nails, staples and the like in them due to fences and wire being tacked to them through the years. I've seen some pretty nice trees that the lumber guys would leave a pretty good chunk of the butt end to burn on site or push in a pile rather than try to harvest. A $100 log with some heavy spike nails in it can ruin a $2000 saw blade.
 

Pete Spaco

Registered
Well, guys, we don't have any metal in the trees. There are actually two power lines running side by side here. The fencing has always (since about 1950 anyways) been in between the two lines so the outer edges of the easements are not even close to the fence line.
They did an easement clearing about 5 years ago or so and I got about a dozen logs at that time and, sure enough, NO metal. All that wood was band mill sawn, stickered immediately and air dried. No twisting problems that I can see.
But, of course I don't get #1 clear lumber from this stuff. When I was a kid I collected popsicle sticks and now I am big, so I collect bigger pieces of wood as long as it has tight knots.
I admit that I have paid extra once or twice over the past 30 years or so for a nail or a maple sap spile, but, with a bandsaw mill they only charged $12 and no parts went flying.
But I do agree that I did see some leaners, but most too small to bother with anyway.
Now you have got me wondering why the larger trees didn't lean. Maybe because they are on the west side of the woods, so they don't get the sun until late afternoon? Hmmm. Of course, they were deeper into the woods anyway until that 5 years ago cleanout.
 
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