• If you like antique engines, vintage tractors or old iron, please register and join us. When registering, please provide your CITY and STATE as your location!

Forklift troubles. :(

Greg Shipley

Registered
Bought a used Clark forklift, gasoline powered, 4 cyl flathead continental engine.
crankcase was full of gas, bad fuel pump, fixed that, filter, oil, had the carb rebuilt, all back together, carb floods,
took it off, floats loose, all seems well, put it back on, no gas this time at all.
took it off again, floats loose, all seems well, put it back on, floods, plugs get soaked with minimal cranking.
does not matter really where the jets are positioned either, it is a little zenith upgraft carb. Any ideas?
 

Gene Williams

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/15/2019
Sounds like the float is hanging up in the bowl. Maybe incorrectly adjusted or the wrong float?
 

grub54891

Registered
Age
62
Last Subscription Date
06/08/2010
It's possible that the float is hanging up on the bowl gasket.I'd check that next.Usually kind of hard to flood an updraft carb,but I've done it myself!How is the compression??
 

Greg Shipley

Registered
have not checked the compression, but there is alot of suck at the air intake of the carb with the air cleaner off.
One thing I forgot to mention, it first started and ran backwards for a few seconds, I adjusted timing for late and then the carb started flooding.
should these carbs have a rubber donut in the seat or is is metal on metal?
My spark is sort of weak, orange not blue I am putting new plugs and a coil on tomorrow as well.
 

grub54891

Registered
Age
62
Last Subscription Date
06/08/2010
I'd check compression just so ya know where you are at with the motor,also I'd tweak the timing back a little.If it's firing to late it'll do that.Does it have point's?may have to clean em up and replace condensor also.Let us know.....
 

Elden DuRand

In Memory Of
Age
78
Last Subscription Date
12/22/2017
Could be that there is so much dirt in the fuel system that it's either plugged or, when the gob of crap breaks loose, it jams the float valve and makes the engine flood.:bonk:

I agree that the condenser is most likely bad. Clean the points while you're in there.

Take care - Elden:wave:
http://www.oldengine.org/members/durand
 

Greg Shipley

Registered
just an update,
last night I took the carb apart and cleaned and inspected all parts, adjusted and bent the floats a bit as they would drag on the bowl.
Put a new set of plugs in this morning, and it started like it had been running 5 minutes earlier, ran nice all day.
I will put a condenser in when we get another warm day just as a precaution,
thanks for all the help.
 

dwlee6vn

Registered
Took the plunge and bought an old Clark forklift. Need help with identification and a few questions. Photos attached. Looks like a “Carloader” from comparison to photos saw posted on web. Has 4 cylinder flathead? gas engine looks like original paint on engine is medium blue. Seems to run well. Seller said it was 3500 lb capacity, but don’t think they knew anything about forklifts beyond what who they bought it from told them. I worked as a ASE certified auto tech for a few years back in the 70’s and have pretty good mechanical knowledge overhauling engines, transmissions, machinery, electric motors etc., but this is my first forklift.

Questions:

SERIAL NUMBER LOCATION FOR ID
I read somewhere serial number was on frame, someone posted was :”under battery” which looks to be in original carrier on right side inside the access door. Took out battery and took a quick look, did not find anything under the accumulated crud in that area. Before I scrape too much, am I looking in the correct place?

BRAKES
When I got it home, the brake pedal did nothing – went to floorboard with no resistance or braking action. Looked in master cylinder and it was about ½ full of fluid. That was yesterday. Today I went out in garage and pumped the brake pedal a bunch of times, and now it has resistance, firm not spongy near the top of it’s travel. Did not have room or time to start it up and move it, but I could hear something moving inside the right front wheel when I pressed on the brake pedal and I put the machine in neutral and rocked it fore and aft a little with a 2x4 and pressing the brake pedal stopped me being able to rock it, so maybe the brakes do work? I’m not one for fixing it if it ain’t broke so will add some brake fluid and try things out when I get some time. Any ideas on why no pedal yesterday, OK today?

HYDRAULIC OIL MILKY COLOR
The oil in the hydraulic tank which is in front of the motor, sort of under the front of the seat looks milky. Photo attached shows a bit of it running down the outside of the tank that dripped off a dipstick I stuck in to check the level. Any idea why it is this color? How high in the tank is the level supposed to be, and what oil to use? Can I get the 5 gallon pail of tractor hydraulic fluid/trans fluid and use that? How about automotive automatic transmission fluid? The lift seems to work OK and it has no major leaks, the lift cylinder area especially is dry. The little bit it does leak somewhere leaves a few drips on the floor at right front of the machine, maybe a few inches overnight. The radiator coolant looks clear light green like someone did use an antifreeze mix in it, so there does not appear to be comingling of coolant, though I don’t even think these systems are interconnected anywhere.

ENGINE OIL DIPSTICK
Where is the engine oil dipstick and any idea how much oil goes in the motor and oil filter part numbers?

STEERING
The unit has about 1/3 of a turn free play in the steering. Have not looked underneath to see where the play is – probably stack up of all linkages and box. Is this “normal” for a machine this age? Any suggestions where to look first?
 

Attachments

dwlee6vn

Registered
My first thought too, but how would water get in there? Any idea how much fluid in the system and best way to drain it all out and put in new fluid, and what kind?

My idea would be drain tank, put in new fluid, capture return fluid somehow until and run machine and cycle lift/tilt until runs clear on return, adding new fluid as required.

Also, is hydraulic system for lift separate from all other systems? That is, the trans is manual, and the differential and drive wheels are on a separate lube system, probably just splash like a car differential and manual trans (most older trans anyway.)
 

JIMnWV

eMail NOT Working
Last Subscription Date
08/25/2011
I have a little Clark forklift myself that I can't find time to go get, I use to run it quite often and it ran good, the serial # is on a plate on the right side of dash,..at least on mine, should have 4cyl continental ( red seal ), look on battery side of motor in front of starter and see if the dipstick isn't right there, should be filler tube there...and dipstick may be attached to cap, been a long time since I fooled with it. Milky hyd fluid: obviously has a little water in it,...Mine seemed to have the loose motion in steering too, but then again it is far from new. Hope theres a little something in my babbling that will help you.

Jim
 

Attachments

JIMnWV

eMail NOT Working
Last Subscription Date
08/25/2011
I said to look in front of starter for dipstick.....all depends on how you look at it :crazy: it should be between the starter and radiator under the back of generator. I had to buy a new starter for mine some yrs back and boy was they proud of it, 170.00 at napa :eek:

Jim
 

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Dwlee6vn
That looks like a Clark Utili-truck, I have its big brother which has a straight 6 engine and 8000lb capacity. Should be a dipstick on one side of engine, engine oil fill port is above hydraulic pump on mine. Brake pedal is a combination brake/clutch pedal, pressing brake pedal disengages the clutch too. Is your machine a true standard? Or a shuttle shift ie. forward/reverse only? If you can put it in gear without depressing brake/clutch its a shuttle shift. There should be a hydraulic line to the top of the cylinder to keep it lubed too, that is how mine is setup.

Milky hydraulic fluid is from water, even parked indoors this happens to mine, hydraulic fluid is hydroscopic and pulls moisture from the air. I use plain "hydraulic fluid" from autoparts store, comes in 5 gallon buckets.

Is steering manual or power? Mine is manual, yes there is slack in the system, you might be able to tighten it up a tad by adjusting the ball sockets in the linkage rod which runs from steering box to rear control arm.

---------- Post added at 01:13 PM ---------- Previous post was at 12:55 PM ----------

Here is a thread on my Clark troubles, you can see the similarity in the machines. http://www.smokstak.com/forum/showthread.php?t=99973

I think my machine had S# stamped somewhere on the right side of mast, restamped # on the right side plate 20 something years ago.
 

dwlee6vn

Registered
Thanks for all the replies.

I only drove it backwards 10 feet and 20 feet forward into my garage, did not have time to try it out any more than that. It has a clutch on left that engages very near the top of travel. Two gear shift levers, the inboard one is forward, backwards. There is another lever to the right of it that is marked H and L - I think high and low speed ranges?

Several posts say milky hydraulic is due to "a little water" maybe condensation. I have no idea where the unit was parked stored by previous owner. So do folks keep running it with the "little water" in the hydraulics? If I change it out will it happen again - I will store inside. And - how many gallons to change out?
 

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Considering how milky it looks in that pic, I'd say change it. Parked indoors and used regularly it should stay clear, use it once a year for 5 minutes and it will be milky again in a year or 2:(

Sounds like yours is a true standard transmission, wish mine had that.
 

dwlee6vn

Registered
Thanks to all who responded with info on my forklift. I found the serial number which was stamped on the outside of the right side “frame”” the big ½” plate slab side of the machine near the floorboard intersection. I contacted Clark equipment and they sent me a brochure on the machine a 1955 model year Carloader 4024 it turns out to be. 4000 lift capacity with curb weight 6800 pounds. It is a 1 mb file so don’t think can attach but if anyone wants it PM me. They also sent the original build card with all the part numbers in the machine and the name of the original dealer and purchaser which was pretty neat. When I get time I am going to flush/change the brake fluid and the hydraulic oil. The Clark literature says there is an electric parking brake actuator/lock for the hydraulic brakes as one poster mentioned but that button if there was one is gone from my “instrument panel”. Will check that out someday when I get time.
 

Andrew Mackey

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
05/14/2017
SAE 30 if used at above 40F. If used/stored at lower temperature, SAE 20. I an not sure if you could get away with a 10 W-30 multigrade, if you try it, I would keep a close eye on oil pressure, especially when the engine gets hot. If pressure remains above 20 PSI, good for you, If it falls below, then revert to a straight weight oil.
Andrew
 
Top